Posted in music on April 21, 2006

FIRST: I never posted a review, but the David Gilmour show at Radio City Music Hall was one of the best shows I ever saw/heard. I didn't realize how good Radio City's sound can really get, and the light show was unreal...

DAVID GILMOUR @ RADIO CITY | APRIL 4, 2006 (from my camera phone)
David Gilmour @ Radio City

NEXT....

Roger Waters"The tour promises a complete run-through of the 1973 Pink Floyd classic, Dark Side Of The Moon, which for the Magny-Cours concert, boasts Nick Mason on drums! The album will be performed alongside a selection of other Floyd classics, together with a number of Roger's solo material.

Roger was due to be performing at the Velodromo, in Palermo, Sicily on June 6th, but sadly, due to technical difficulties, this has had to be cancelled. A full refund can be obtained from the ticket agents.

Turning to the additional shows, these are being held in Moscow's legendary Red Square on June 24th, and at the Viking Stadium, in Stavanger, Norway, on June 26th. We understand that tickets for the latter show go on sale on April 25th, but are still waiting on confirmation of this. Our Roger Waters 2006 Tour Room will be updated with full details of these two new dates imminently.

We're also hoping to bring you full details of his proposed North American tour very shortly. Our thanks (as ever) to Roger's manager for his help..." [Brain Damage]

AND THE DATES
6 Sept PNC, Holmdel, NJ, USA On sale: May 19th
8 Sept Tweeter Center, Boston, Mass, USA On sale: April 29th
12 Sept Madison Square Garden, New York City, NY, USA On sale: May 15th
13 Sept Madison Square Garden, New York City, NY, USA On sale: May 15th
15 Sept Jones Beach, Wantagh, NY, USA On sale: May 19th

All dates below....

ROGER WATERS TOUR DATES
6 Sept PNC, Holmdel, NJ, USA On sale: May 19th
8 Sept Tweeter Center, Boston, Mass, USA On sale: April 29th
12 Sept Madison Square Garden, New York City, NY, USA On sale: May 15th
13 Sept Madison Square Garden, New York City, NY, USA On sale: May 15th
15 Sept Jones Beach, Wantagh, NY, USA On sale: May 19th
16 Sept Tweeter Center, Camden, NJ, USA On sale: May 13th
18 Sept The Palace, Detroit, MI, USA On sale: May 6th
20 Sept Air Canada Centre, Toronto, Canada On sale: May 1st
21 Sept Bell Centre, Montreal, Canada On sale: May 1st
23 Sept Nissan Center, Bristow, VA, USA On sale: May 20th
24 Sept Post Gazette Pavilion, Pittsburgh, PA, USA On sale: May 1st
27 Sept Gund Center, Cleveland, OH, USA On sale: April 29th
29 Sept First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre, Chicago, IL, USA On sale: May 1st
30 Sept Verizon Wireless, Indianapolis, IN, USA On sale: May 1st
3 Oct Cricket Pavilion, Phoenix, AZ, USA On sale: April 29th
5 Oct Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, CA, USA On sale: April 30th
8 Oct Theater Under The Stars, Las Vegas, NV, USA On sale: TBA
10 Oct Shoreline Amphitheatre, San Francisco, CA, USA On sale: May 7th
12 Oct Key Arena, Seattle, WA, USA On sale: May 6th

(thx thighmaster!)

Previously
Roger Waters to Perform Dark Side of the Moon (in France)
Pink Floyd say they're not reuniting (again)
David Gilmour Tour Dates | Tickets

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Comments (134)

he's very handsome

Posted by sam | April 21, 2006 12:33 PM

the Gilmour show was one of the best i've seen. the second night he played Wots... Uh, The Deal. Unreal.

Posted by conrad | April 21, 2006 12:37 PM

Gilmour was a great show. However, the new songs didn't really thrill me; at least they were mostly salvaged by one of his guitar solos.

But the Floyd set was incredible, and in particular, the transcendent version of "Echoes", accompanied by an epilepsy-inducing lighting display, was jaw-dropping.

Posted by drewo | April 21, 2006 12:45 PM

why dont waters and gilly juss grow some balls and reunite for forks sake... or at least team up with danger mouse to form dikembe mutrombone

Posted by thigh master | April 21, 2006 12:51 PM

gilmour said to the toronto star in an interview that he just didnt want to at this point. so dont expect anything, he said "im too old"

Posted by Anonymous | April 21, 2006 2:20 PM

Kind of bummed that Gillmore won't be there. But frigin psyched that Mason will be on drums! Hell yeah.

Posted by This is so Punk | April 21, 2006 3:07 PM

Presale tickets went on sale today. You need to use an American Express card to buy them. Use the 800# on the back of your card for the best seats, but also more pricey seats. Tickets are available through ticketmaster.com

Posted by Shades | April 22, 2006 5:46 PM

Presale tickets went on sale today. You need to use an American Express card to buy them. Use the 800# on the back of your card for the best seats, but also more pricey seats. Tickets are available through ticketmaster.com

Posted by Shades | April 22, 2006 5:47 PM

Presale tickets went on sale today. You need to use an American Express card to buy them. Use the 800# on the back of your card for the best seats, but also more pricey seats. Tickets are available through ticketmaster.com

Posted by Shades | April 22, 2006 5:49 PM

Hi, Where in the USA,is Nick Mason performing with Roger Waters, in the upcoming USA tour?
Thanks,Mina

Posted by Mina | July 10, 2006 9:55 AM

Roger Waters went on and on for years about how he hated playing big open air venues, yet there he was playing Hyde park in London in July. I am a life long Floyd/Waters fan but did not go becuase I cant think of a worse enviroment to see him perform. People I know went and said it was ok, but only ok. That gig at Hyde park was also the only UK show he is doing on this tour but, he is going all over the U.S. playing up to about 20 shows. So much for the fans at home ay Rog. He knows what side his bread is buttered. The sell out.

Posted by Reen | August 7, 2006 10:23 AM

Roger Waters went on and on for years about how he hated playing big open air venues, yet there he was playing Hyde park in London in July. I am a life long Floyd/Waters fan but did not go becuase I cant think of a worse enviroment to see him perform. People I know went and said it was ok, but only ok. That gig at Hyde park was also the only UK show he is doing on this tour but, he is going all over the U.S. playing up to about 20 shows. So much for the fans at home ay Rog. He knows what side his bread is buttered. The sell out.

Posted by Reen | August 7, 2006 10:33 AM

Well, I actually went to the hyde park gig, have seen Waters and Floyd play before the reunion and I must say I have never seen anything quite so astonishing in my life. Most of the people I knew who also went to the gig came away saying it was the greatest gig they had ever seen. I saw grown men crying at the end of Dark Side of the Moon

If any of our US cousins aren't sure about whether to go and see Rog on this tour, all I can say is throw caution to the wind and go, you will not be dissappointed...

Posted by Jansen | September 6, 2006 5:09 PM

Saw the show at PNC 9/6/06
he ruin his show with a Bush and Christian bashing song that everyone boo'd
Other then that the Floyd songs where great

Posted by Pinkman | September 7, 2006 10:58 AM

I saw the show last nigth at PNC (9/6/06), too. Fantastic show until he played his anti-American song. He certainly made sure we heard each and every lyric since he posted them on the screen as he sang. He comes to our country to play for his fans & this is what we get treated to? My husband and I were so turned off by that song that it partially ruined the 2nd half of the incredible show. I now have to say that I love the music but don't care much for the man. We're seeing him again in 2 weeks at the Tweeter Center with my son & at least I'm prepared for that song. Maybe he'll have the good sense to remove it from his otherwise excellent set list.

Posted by Paula | September 7, 2006 6:54 PM

I saw the show last nigth at PNC (9/6/06), too. Fantastic show until he played his anti-American song. He certainly made sure we heard each and every lyric since he posted them on the screen as he sang. He comes to our country to play for his fans & this is what we get treated to? My husband and I were so turned off by that song that it partially ruined the 2nd half of the incredible show. I now have to say that I love the music but don't care much for the man. We're seeing him again in 2 weeks at the Tweeter Center with my son & at least I'm prepared for that song. Maybe he'll have the good sense to remove it from his otherwise excellent set list.

Posted by Paula | September 7, 2006 6:55 PM

I, too, was at the concert last night (9/6/06) at PNC. It was fantastic until Waters ruined it by playing his anti-American song. He certainly wanted us to know every last word of that song since he posted the lyrics on the screen as he sang. My husband & I were really angry to hear it. He comes to our country to play for his fans & this is what we're treated to? As amazing as the concert was, it was hard to enjoy the 2nd half. We're going to see him again in 2 weeks at the Tweeter Center in Philly with my son & I hope he removes that song from his set list. I now have to say that I love the music but don't care for the man.

Posted by Paula | September 7, 2006 7:10 PM

Comes to our country?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but hasn't Roger lived in NYC for many, many years?

Posted by Anonymous | September 7, 2006 7:26 PM

Sorry for the 3 posts! The first 2 didn't go thru, or so I thought, & then they all showed up.

Posted by Paula | September 7, 2006 7:27 PM

wow, was the song really that offensive? i am curious what the lyrics are now

Posted by Anonymous | September 7, 2006 10:24 PM

I was absolutely flabbergasted at the crowd’s reaction to Beirut. I enjoyed the song very much. That being said, I find it highly amusing that the most “patriotic” (read “jingoistic”) right-wingers in the audience, always first to defend “American rights and freedoms”, were the most offended by Roger’s display of free speech (remember the 1st amendment to the constitution?). Pure hypocrisy which aptly characterizes the present administration. I’d like to publicly apologize To Roger and the band for this boorish display. Get a life people.

The booing that occurred during Leaving Beirut is reflective of ill-informed, ignorant fans who were clearly there to enjoy the retro trip of Dark Side. Thank you fellow fans who clearly understand that the meaning of life is to be; which has always been the message of Roger Waters.

Let's face it, its what has driven the man to create the very same albums that they were all there to hear. The level of ignorance in the crowd last night was astounding in my opinion. I thought following up with the song "Sheep" was exactly appropriate, and I'm sure its placement after "Leaving Beirut" in the setlist was not an accident.

Let the people jeer, then bring out the inflatable pig and watch them cheer again.

I love ya Rog, and Happy Birthday my friend!

Posted by Stuart | September 8, 2006 12:58 PM

Stuart, freedom of speech is the ability to say whatever one wants to. It is not also protection from the consequences of speech. Those in the audience who booed were not offended by his exercise of his right to free speech but by the content of his speech. And they merely exercised their own right to free speech by booing. Regardless of whether or not the booing was rude or what have you, it's not hypocritical as you claim.

Posted by Boo Radley | September 8, 2006 1:39 PM

Yes you make a good point; however we digress - The essence of my post is to point out that paying a fair whack of cash for a ticket to a ROGER WATERS(!) gig and completely mis-interpreting the message and therfore failing to grasp the entire Pink Floyd legacy, is merely indicative of the a certain level of idiocy.

I am certainly happy that the majority of American people at the gig who can actually think for themself, made themselves known. I guess some just can't comprehend the bigger picture.

Posted by Stuart | September 9, 2006 11:28 AM

i only saw half the show my brother passed out drunk and i had to go with him to the hospital but it was still the best show i have ever seen

Posted by john parent | September 10, 2006 8:47 PM

latest dates

Wednesday, September 06, 2006
Holmdel, NJ: PNC
Friday, May 19th - On Sale Date

Friday, September 08-09, 2006
Boston / Tweeter
Saturday, April 29th

Tuesday, September 12, 2006
New York City: MSG
Monday, May 15th

Wednesday, September 13, 2006
New York City: MSG
Monday, May 15th

Friday, September 15, 2006
Wantagh, NY Jones Beach
Friday, May 19th

Saturday, September 16, 2006
South Jersey/Philadelphia: Camden
Saturday, May 13th

Monday, September 18, 2006
Detroit / The Palace
Saturday, May 6th

Wednesday, September 20, 2006
Toronto / Air Canada
Monday, May 1st

Thursday, September 21, 2006
Montreal Bell Centre
Monday, May 1st

Saturday, September 23, 2006
Bristow, VA Nissan
Saturday, May 20th

Sunday, September 24, 2006
Pittsburgh: Post Gazette Pavilion
Monday, May 1st

Wednesday, September 27, 2006
Cleveland/Gund
Saturday, April 29th

Friday, September 29, 2006
Chicago: First Midwest Bank Amp.
Monday, May 1st

Saturday, September 30, 2006
Indianapolis-Verizon Wireless
Monday, May 1st

Tuesday, October 03, 2006
Phoenix-Cricket Pavilion
Saturday, April 29th

Thursday, October 05,06,08, 2006
Los Angeles: Hollywood Bowl
Sunday, April 30th

Sunday, October 08, 2006
Las Vegas: Theater Under the Stars - CANCELLED
TBA

Tuesday, October 10, 2006
San Francisco: Shoreline
Sunday, May 7th

Thursday, October 12, 2006
Seattle, WA: Key Arena
Saturday, May 6th

Posted by Anonymous | September 12, 2006 11:05 AM

On the day after we memorialize my cousin, my FDNY Brothers, NYPD, and thousands of innocent Americans who were muredered that black day, this guy has the temerity to come to America, bash her, her president and his prime minister, while waxing poetic and all nostalgic for the good old days in Beirut with a loving Moslem family???? And then he bashes "Right Wing Christians"? Try singing about "Right Wing Moslems" with the same contempt in lovely Beirut and see what THEY do to your dhimmi, infidel neck as they saw through. "Right Wing Christians" will fight to defend his right to sing whatever he wants in our great America, and they will pray for his soul in the bargain. Not drive a plane into his arena.
Hey Rog, don't mind putting those American Benjamins in your pocket do ya?
I proudly booed, walked out went with my date and listened to the DVD of Paul McCartney's OCT 20, 01 concert at the Garden and relived the gratitude and love as he sang "Fight for Your Right For Freedom" for my city, my Firefighter brothers, NYPD and the heroes wives, and children.
Hearing David Bowie sing "Heroes", and James Brown sing "Fire and Rain" will always ring in my heart.

Grateful to be an American, always

Posted by Jim Kearney | September 13, 2006 5:35 PM

I, too, was at the concert the day after the 5 year anniv. and thought it hard to embrace that song. There was a gentleman and a woman sitting next to us who left during the song and yelled out something less than kind. I saw this song hit a cord and got a very strong feeling that this man had been directly affected by the sept. 11th events. The whole "he has a right to freedom of speech thing" is bull_ _ _ _ . He has a right to speak his mind and portray that through his music. However, the day after the 5th anniv. of the most horrific day in America he has a concert and goes on about this family who gave him a car ride and the correlation of that family to how good these people are and how bad we are. Wake up, this man hates our Goverment, he hates our President and he hates Americans. It doesn't take a genius to figure it out. I don't give a hoot that he lived in this country for a period of time. So, too, did the hijackers on 9/11. Different time, different place, the song might not have met with such disgust(it's called discretion). This man has not one ounce of apathy towards Americans. I love the music but dislike the man, not because of his views but because of his lack of humanity.

Posted by gail | September 13, 2006 7:46 PM

to jimkearney,
you may have been the one sitting next to us at the concert!

Posted by gail | September 13, 2006 7:53 PM

to jimkearney,
you may have been the one sitting next to us at the concert!

Posted by gail | September 13, 2006 7:54 PM

Well, those that booed and walked out during his set and what he said obviouly don't get it, and may never will. The Bush admin is so outof control and wrong in so many ways. That does not mean that the 'Al Qaeda' Terrorists are right, because they are so wrong in so many ways as well.

Roger's opinions with our Gov't in the USA are with the majority of the american people now, so he is with the concensus of americans.

His story about this family was a true story, adn the point was TO MAKE YOU THINK!!!

THINK!!!

THINK!!!

The show was awesome, and I applaud Roger, because he's right.

Posted by tom | September 13, 2006 9:14 PM

I don't get some of you neo-cons... you obviously aren't Roger waters fans if that song offended you. This is not exactly the first time (by far) he has written a song like this. God, you sound like Rush Lintball.

Posted by michael | September 14, 2006 8:03 PM

He does not hate America. Like most of the world, he can't stand our corrupt government. Why do I bother- I'm sure you sat down and fell asleep after you heard "Money" and the Wall segment. Apathy towards Americans?! Do you know how much money he has donated and fundraisers he was apart of? Let me ask you, chief: What have YOU done for your country? Go back to your desperate housewives and leave music to the artists. As far as 911, what facts do you think you know? You'll believe anything they tell ya.

Posted by zaxa4 | September 14, 2006 8:20 PM

I hear ya, Zax. It's pretty sad that even now, there are still people who live in such fear and refuse to see how things are. Some folks don't want to think, because it may threaten there convictions. Why do they insist on equating loving the administration with loving America. As if it's the same thing. Um, Mr. Kearney: since when did Jesus teach your right wing Christians to kill innocent people in the wrong country? Think about it- what was the point of Jesus dying to begin with? I suggest you check your bible and political facts before posing an argument.

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 10:05 AM

LOL- I was just thinking the same thing! I thought Jesus taught stuff like "Turn the other cheek" and "If man be your enemy, show him love." It's funny, but if you really read the new testament, you'll see that Jesus was a pretty big liberal. Anyway, ALL OF US were effected by 911 (I know some of us here have been closely effected). I'll stand and clap for Roger tonight. Why? Because I do love America.

Posted by zaxa4 | September 15, 2006 10:29 AM

Gail, when you say:

"This man has not one ounce of apathy towards Americans. I love the music but dislike the man, not because of his views but because of his lack of humanity."

Wow...... lack of humanity? He's all about humanity. Who's next on the list, Peter Gabriel?

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 10:46 AM

Yeah, unless you own the karaoke versions of Roger's albums, it's difficult to love his music, but say he's inhumane.
One thing I'll admit, is that we can all debate something here- but I know we're all good people. If we weren't, would we spend time on message boards?

Posted by zaxa4 | September 15, 2006 11:28 AM

Couldn't have said it better, brother. I'll drink to that!

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 11:29 AM

Couldn't have said it better, brother. I'll drink to that!

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 11:31 AM

LOL!!!!!!!!! Can you imagine singing karaoke at a bar, with the little ball bouncing over the lyrics of "Too Much Rope?" That would be something. Sorry, just thought I'd lighten the mood.

Posted by Jay | September 15, 2006 11:41 AM

Im just glad i dont have to watch it in america and get to watch it in montreal... where i might add everyone one of those people in that stadium will no doubt be giving him a standing ovation to that song. screw you Jim Kearney, if you dont get Pink Floyd wtf bother going? Mindlessly sitting there listening to his music because you want a break from your 9-5 job and want to veg out is exactly what is wrong with your country. Taking in each lyric and digesting the meaning of their music is why its held the test of time. Catchy music doesn't hold the test of time except for the sheep. it the message musicians bring to their music that keep us comming. I find it hilarious you found solace in listening to paul mccartney after the concert seeing as how he was part of the beatles and the most anti-war rock and roll peace loving group in all of history. Get a life buddy. Go listen to christian rock, or country western music about drinking your face off and being ignorant to the atrocities of the world if you cant understand the message of rock and roll. Didn't 'the fletcher memorial home' make any sense to you of where pink floyd's ideologies lie when you were younger or are you mentally insane?

Posted by Jack | September 15, 2006 1:19 PM

Jack, you're right. The sad part is, most people here don't even know the Final Cut album (my personal favorite). We can blame the media here, or the government or whomever else, but honestly, some people just don't care to understand what's going on in the world and the music that reflects it... perhaps this was why Roger took exception with part of his audience in the past. It's not enough to get drunk and smoke up at a concert til you pass out- and then wake up and scream "America: love it or leave it!"

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 1:40 PM

"This man has not one ounce of apathy towards Americans. "

anyone get this yet???
apathy = lack of concern

"This man has not one ounce of 'lack of concern' for Americans."

So, he does care about us Yanks!
So, whatcha complaining about?
You GO, Rog!

Posted by fozra | September 15, 2006 4:18 PM

"This man has not one ounce of apathy towards Americans. "

anyone get this yet???
apathy = lack of concern

"This man has not one ounce of 'lack of concern' for Americans."

So, he does care about us Yanks!
So, whatcha complaining about?
You GO, Rog!

Posted by fozra | September 15, 2006 4:20 PM

sorry about the double post...it was an internal server error made me do it...

Posted by fozra | September 15, 2006 4:21 PM

HAHA!!!! That's great. Well Rog-haters, I hate to piss on your picnic, but this may be up your alley: Britney Spears just gave birth to a second child. Her site must have a message board... go check it out!

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 4:36 PM

I gotta point something out here:

Jack wrote, "screw you Jim Kearney, if you dont get Pink Floyd wtf bother going? Mindlessly sitting there listening to his music because you want a break from your 9-5 job and want to veg out is exactly what is wrong with your country."

But Jim Kearney began his post with "On the day after we memorialize my cousin, my FDNY Brothers, NYPD..." To me, that indicates he's part of a fire department, if not the FDNY.

Posted by Anonymous | September 15, 2006 4:47 PM

Though that's not a strong argument, is it?

Posted by luv | September 15, 2006 4:58 PM

I hope tonight's show at Jones Beach doesn't cancel. It's pouring here.

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 5:21 PM

Re: Jack's Comments
I for one will proudly go the concert in Detroit even though I live in Canada. And I will proudly and loudly boo this anti-American and anti-Christian song if it's played. You say you're going to Montreal to watch it. No doubt with Quebecs' mentally defective left wing skewed politics people there will like it. You would rather be part of Europe instead of North America anyway. Just remember the atrocities are being commited by al qaeda and the Taliban, but I guess that's just hunky dory according to your myopic view of things. They should send windbags like you to Iraq and Afghanistan and see how quick you change your pathetic little tune.
Waters has a right to play this tune and I have a
right to boo.( Ijust think he's an asshole for playing it here with soldiers fighting for freedom at this time)
That being said, hope you enjoy the concert and HAVE A NICE DAY!

Posted by Don | September 15, 2006 5:56 PM

"I just think he's an asshole for playing it here with soldiers fighting for freedom at this time."

Guess that means you're against any anti-Vietnam war songs written in the '60's as well.

Posted by Anonymous | September 15, 2006 7:38 PM

Vietnam was a whole different ballgame.
We didn't have have nutjobs crashing planes into buildings, beheading innocent hostages, holding public hangings at soccer stadiums and keeping women as slaves with no education or human rights.
How come nobody writes a song about that. Why do these people always blame the USA for what's going on and nobody else. Blaming the US for the world's problems is the latest cause for the left wing Hollywood,rock star,ultra rich and famous braindead morons that are only in touch with the uneducated and uninformed and not the regular folks that pay blood,taxes and tears to keep our way of life alive. Once again, I love the old Floyd stuff, I just think he's being an insensitive idiot by playing it at this time.

Posted by Don | September 15, 2006 8:59 PM

What, Don?

"he's being an insensitive idiot by playing it at this time."

Did you even see his show? My wife and I just got back from his Jones Beach concert. We, along with 15,000 other New Yorkers applauded "Leaving Beruit." If there were any boo's at all, they were completely drowned out by cheer. I am sick to my stomach at the ignorance of such comments. If you knew anything about his music, you'd know of plenty written in regards to your above examples. In fact, nothing you said is accurate.
"left wing Hollywood,rock star,ultra rich and famous braindead morons that are only in touch with the uneducated and uninformed and not the regular folks that pay blood,taxes and tears to keep our way of life alive."
Uh my God, good luck with this idiot, guys.

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 11:45 PM

SERIOUSLY. Don, I don't think you know what an "insenitive idiot" YOU are..... and how many hard working New Yorkers you may have offended. I didn't go to the Jones Beach show tonight, but I was at MSG in Manhattan a couple of days ago. Michael, you're dead on. I heard one guy booing behind us. Sure he had the right to, but his booing was based on CLEAR misinterpretations. Roger really does care about us here... that was his whole point! Forget it, bro. You'll never get through to this dude. Don, if you feel so strong about the war in Iraq, what the heck are you doing on this message board?! Go sign up for the Army and quit being an arm-chair republican. HAVE A NICE NIGHT, DONNY-BOY!!!

Posted by zaxa4 | September 15, 2006 11:56 PM

Let's not waste any more time on this one. He's so proud to come and boo Roger in Detroit (based on a show he hasn't seen), but he's currently living in Canada? Yeah, a real proud American indeed.

Posted by michael | September 15, 2006 11:59 PM

Not to mention New York is a blue state (by a large majority), so he just called millions of us New York left-wingers morons. All because there are people with a different set of beliefs than his.

Posted by zaxa4 | September 16, 2006 12:23 AM

i just got in from the show. it was amazing.
i lost 2 close friends on 911. don, you should be ashamed of yourself. maybe if we place a windbag like you overseas, perhaps you'll sing a different tune.

Posted by Sandy | September 16, 2006 12:53 AM

When people like Don start whingeing about "left wing Hollywood,rock star,ultra rich and famous braindead morons", they forget that most of these people they call elite started out like us. Most of them came from working class families - blue and white collar. Most of them - especially the ones who have staying power - worked to get where they are - like the rest of us. Some are brilliant, most are average, and some are morons - like the rest of us.

Contrast with our current administration: born into wealth and privilege, gaining their public status and power through cronyism and nepotism - not hard work. These people are far less like us average Americans (and average people as a whole), and they know it best. They are the true elite and they speak down to us like we're children. Stop accepting that insult! Pay Attention! Think!

Or just start by growing the hell up enough to realize that when someone expresses a disagreeing or critical point of view it doesn't mean they hate you.

Personally, I'd lend an ear to someone who puts thought to produce their own expression (whether I agree with it or not) well before I put unquestioning faith in someone who constantly attempts to sway me with speech based upon "talking points" written by hired hands based upon the work of their public relations teams.

Posted by fozra | September 16, 2006 12:56 AM

BTW, great show tonite.
There were a coupla booers (boors-ha!) in my nosebleed section, but us folks in the row V applauded and cheered.
And the pig was hysterical - fly away! Look out for that heavy NY air traffic!

Posted by fozra | September 16, 2006 1:02 AM

I wonder where that pig landed? It's probably on the roof of Don's house. We'll see it on eBay for 8,000 clams. What a great show, rain and all.

Posted by michael | September 16, 2006 10:44 AM

I wonder where that pig landed. Probably on Don's roof. we'll find it on eBay for 8,000 clams. Great show, rain and all.

Posted by michael | September 16, 2006 10:52 AM

Michael said :"My wife and I just got back from his Jones Beach concert. We, along with 15,000 other New Yorkers applauded "Leaving Beruit." If there were any boo's at all, they were completely drowned out by cheer." I was there too and I heard plenty of booing. I was just in shock at the set this guy has...I paid big bucks for only "decent" seats to hear what I thought was going to be a relaxing night listening to Dark Side of the Moon (I did not check any reviews first, so I did not expect this song), not to listen to his political jabbering in the form of a "new" song that he hopes I like.

I paid too much money to leave...but I wanted to. Luckily my hubby calmed me down and reminded me that I never liked Roger Waters, I like Pink Floyd and sadly, this is closest we'll get to the band.

If I had it to do over again, I would not have gone...plain and simple. Don't take my money and then politicize the show...play what we came to hear!

Posted by Robin Flannery | September 16, 2006 10:17 PM

Shine on Don!
These are the same dummies that believe "if we stop, they'll stop!"

By the way...anyone seen the new commericals for "the other Iraq"? Tell me we are not doing good over there!

This is way off course, though. The concert was less than it should have been because of the political musings of the songster. Definitely my mistake, not his - I should have expected it!

Posted by Robin Flannery | September 16, 2006 10:59 PM

"Luckily my hubby calmed me down and reminded me that I never liked Roger Waters, I like Pink Floyd and sadly, this is closest we'll get to the band."

If you never liked Roger, then you never liked Pink Floyd. And yeah, you should've expected it, Robin.
"These are the same dummies that believe 'if we stop, they'll stop!'" I've met some pretty ignorant people, but I'm glad I'll never have to meet you.
If you despise politics in music, go listen to Michael Bolton.

Posted by zaxa4 | September 16, 2006 11:10 PM

Like him or hate 'em, he's got you on message boards on a Saturday night. Get a life, guys. Robin, you sound like my high school students. Bye, now.

Posted by Kris | September 16, 2006 11:14 PM

Kris, what are you doing here then?

Posted by Robin Flannery | September 16, 2006 11:16 PM

Robin: you never liked Waters, but you liked Floyd? What albums did you actually enjoy? What you saw on stage was something Floyd did for nearly 40 years. I'm sorry, who's the dummy?

Posted by zaxa4 | September 16, 2006 11:21 PM

Oh, that's right. You were there for Dark Side. I guess you also had the karaoke version without the lyrics.

Posted by zaxa4 | September 16, 2006 11:26 PM

What's Kris, the high school teacher, doing here on a Saturday night? Taking a break from doing some of the after-hours work her (or his) job requires is a good bet.

Posted by Screech | September 17, 2006 12:27 AM

Does anyone know what was written on the pig at the Tweeter Center last night, all I could see was "Free at Last"????? Thanks

Posted by Atomheartretta | September 17, 2006 4:05 PM

Yeah, it said "Hilary for President"...

Posted by Anonymous | September 17, 2006 6:46 PM

Hillary Clinton is NOT looked upon fondly by Americans who protest the war in Iraq and thus is probably not looked upon fondly by Roger Waters, either.

Posted by get a clue | September 17, 2006 9:14 PM

I think that the Pig said "Out of Iraq"?

Posted by venus9 | September 18, 2006 1:29 AM

waters was the best show i have ever seen

Posted by Anonymous | September 18, 2006 9:56 PM

simply "Amazing"
Sold out show at the air canada centre in Toronto. "keep hope alive Roger Waters!"

Posted by Lisa | September 21, 2006 6:29 PM

Jesse Jackson is posting here now?

Posted by Anonymous | September 21, 2006 8:55 PM

ROGER WATERS MONTREAL(09/21/06) You all Seem to complain about the concert, Most dont, Don't blame it all on the singer or band you all paid BIG money to go see! Blame it on your self.. The concert was AWESOME!(MONTREAL CANADA 09/21/06 Bell Center) My Complaint, Too many POT smoking concert goers...I always Try to get the (young) involved in Pink Floyd!~! Roger Waters (Dont have to explain) TAKE it to the (OUT SIDE) or (BATH ROOM) people....Was disappointed with the so called Pink Floyd ADULTS (loads of middle aged Roger Water fans) concert goers who smoked there drugs 1 row above a 1 row below and 2 seats to my left and 2 seats to my right as my 14 year old daughter GAGGED!!!, The smell of drugs was so overwelming WOW!! SOO.. We finally left our (Very Expensive seats) to stand in the entrance way!! Other then that, The concert and Roger Waters will always RULE!! Sweet Concert Thanks Roger !!! And so Will The Gossip, Love Your Children and the rest will follow. Wanna complain about Roger Waters (LYRICS) GET REHAB !! Like always for 30 years, We Enjoy your music, SIR Waters and Peace All !!

Posted by at | September 22, 2006 5:34 AM

ha,ha,ha,ha...OH YOU SILLY MAN with your 14yr. old at a PF Concert!! And how old are you? Judging by your stupidity, you would seem to be much more clueless than might be expected of your 14 yr.old! Ha...leaving good seats just to escape the, as you implied, 'brain damaging potential effect' of the wicked weed on your daughter! The only danger you face is looking like a complete A-hole by leaving your seats
and a major Hypocrite...Ha,ha,ha...thanks for the laugh...you fool!

Posted by venus | September 22, 2006 1:02 PM

LIBERALISM is an insidious, awful disease. Not unlike a cancer. We can only sympathize with these poor souls. Hopefully one day someone will find a cure.

I have no problem with Roger expressing his LIBERAL (diseased) views at his performance. I actually find it comical and pathetic at the same time.

Posted by Gary | September 22, 2006 1:44 PM

"Harmlessly passing your time in the grassland away;
Only dimly aware of a certain unease in the air.
You better watch out,
There may be dogs about
Ive looked over jordan, and I have seen
Things are not what they seem.

What do you get for pretending the dangers not real.
Meek and obedient you follow the leader
Down well trodden corridors into the valley of steel.
What a surprise!
A look of terminal shock in your eyes.
Now things are really what they seem.
No, this is no bad dream.

The lord is my shepherd, I shall not want
He makes me down to lie
Through pastures green he leadeth me the silent waters by.
With bright knives he releaseth my soul.
He maketh me to hang on hooks in high places.
He converteth me to lamb cutlets"

You say liberalism is a disease? I say you read the lyrics above you idiot - doubtful that this time round you'll understand! Maybe you might just stare at them blankly and then rabble on about Rog "dissing" the USA and her army.

but let's not get involved in politics, I'm from Scotland, praise be, hallelujah to the liberals, haha. Oh, it should be at this point in time which will draw the obligatory xenophobic comment from some brainless neanderthal redneck.

Anyway, cousins, brothers and friends - we will always have the satisfaction that there is no hope for the peasants; purely because we use the one thing we have more of - and that is our MINDS

Posted by Stuart Milligan | September 23, 2006 10:03 AM

Stuart- you don't know your coley from your mackeral my Scottish friend. I am a Canadian, and support my American brothers in their righteous fight against evil. Have a nice day.

Posted by Gary | September 23, 2006 11:53 PM

Stuart- another thing your band Suspire is REALLY BAD.

Posted by Gary | September 24, 2006 12:00 AM

Stuart- another thing your band Suspire is REALLY BAD.

Posted by Gary | September 24, 2006 12:01 AM

i get to go see the show on saturday in indianapolis. hopefully most will be too high to spoil a good time by booing a song. it's a song. many americans need to realize that we know 1/100th of what really goes on in this world. the media is given information by people that decide what we get to know, then further filter and twist it before it reaches our pretty little heads.
if the song isn't your cup of tea, shut up and wait for the next one. i hate how people in a crowd expect to be number 1. my friends, this is why The Wall was written in the first place. if anyone is that offended, i welcome s/he to leave. it'll be that easier getting out of the hell that is the parking lot.

Posted by Dan | September 25, 2006 7:19 AM

Oh man...this is such a Intellectually HIP forum, awsome! and entertaining too, the majority of it anyway...the Scottish writer (Stuart) should be given the Nobel Prize, he is sooo Right On and did not offend me, a WELL informed American woman, but I would reccomend some maybe SHOCK therapy for GAry though...that might be what it takes for him to wake up to the situation in the Mideast and other places in the world that my government is involved in dominating at the moment in order to expand its Empire...Thanks buddy...Neandrathal Rednecks!hahaha! Great description of that bobble-headed Idiot-excuse-for-a-Prez, doesn't it? I Love YOU Stuart! And, I bet your band is sounds phenominal! Venus, Laguna Beach, California, USA

Posted by venus | September 25, 2006 1:50 PM

haha! thanks, click on my name below and you can decide for yourself. It's always encouraging, Venus, to hear from folk who are capable of using the organ in their heads. Well in my friend.

Gary from Canada, I'm afraid I don't know my coley from my mackerel (thats mackerel with an E Gary)- I leave the fishing to fat businessmen tourists, and old men with wellington boots; so you can take the medias - oh, sorry - the governments war on evil, all the coley and mackerel in the world, roll it up and smoke it.

Another thing, when we do tour America, I hope peasants like you pay upwards of $50 for a ticket and boo, so I can laugh at another little piece of history repeating.

Posted by Stuart Milligan | September 25, 2006 6:29 PM

I saw Roger last night in Pittsburgh, everything was excellent until he started flashing Bush photos along with Bin Laden and Hussein and mocked him by referring to him as Georgie. It ruined my whole experience. How repulsive that I paid such a price to see this uninformed musician make a horrible political statement. I don't recall Pink Floyd doing this, ever, in all of the past concerts that I attended.

He's not even a citizen of our country, what right does he have to push his pitiful agenda when I'm paying for it? Since thats how he really feels, I wish he'd just kept it to himself or at least not performed the song on American soil.

I was so angry, I'll never listen to his material again, I was really was shocked. How would Roger like it if Godsmack when to London, and burned an effigy of the Queen on-stage and then burnt their flag. I'm sure he'd be really put off also.

Wether you agree with our leadership or not, a concert is not a forum to push a political agenda and bash our president, particularly when we are at war and he's not a citizen of this Great Nation.

Mark


Posted by mark | September 25, 2006 11:04 PM

Michael Smerconish | ROGER WATERS: THE PINKO IN FLOYDFOR THE second time in my life, I'm writing a column about Pink Floyd. Specifically, about the man I've always considered to be the brains of the band: Roger Waters. The first time I wrote about him was 26 years ago when I was a high school senior at Central Bucks West in Doylestown and editor of the school paper, the Chatterbux.

Back then, I was one of the lucky few to see Pink Floyd perform "The Wall," live at the Nassau County Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y. My review earned me an invitation to the principal's office. I was encouraged to write a retraction on the grounds that I'd promoted a band whose lyrics the principal associated with drug use.

It was a moment straight out of "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2," "We don't need no education" indeed. I told the principal to pound sand. Maybe even called it a matter of "free speech."

For three decades, the Floyd has never left my playlist.

In fact, I have done what I call "the cycle" for every Floyd and Roger Waters recording, meaning I bought it in all forms in which it was released: album, 8-track, cassette and CD. I once made a London taxi driver take me to the Battersea Power Station just so I could photograph the image that appears on the cover of my favorite album, "Animals." No one was more pleased when the band reunited to headline at Live 8. And in the never-ending debate among Floyd fans on David Gilmore vs. Rogers Waters, I've always sided with Waters.

My affinity for Waters has always been in spite of his politics. Chalk that up to spending too much time studying song lyrics back in the day when they printed such things. I thought rock stars had all the answers.

Fast-forward 25 years.

Last Wednesday, I sat in the front row for a Roger Waters performance at Madison Square Garden. (The same show came to the Tweeter Center in Camden Saturday night.) The crowd was diverse, but mostly like me: white middle-aged guys with receding hair and expanding waists.

It should have been a night to have a few beers and enjoy the soundtrack of my life. Instead, I sat there in my expensive seat, and heckled the guy whose music I know by heart.

Waters' politics are no longer just liberal, they're over the top.

I was expecting the line about "incurable tyrants and kings" when he sang "Fletcher Memorial Home," and I knew there'd be references to Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan.

What I wasn't prepared for was a photo montage featuring Osama, Saddam and George W. Bush. Especially not two days removed from the anniversary of Sept. 11 in the city where the most death and destruction occurred.

I'm sick and tired of entertainment types arguing a moral equivalency between our president and the Butcher of Baghdad and the architect of 9/11.

It's not that I object to the criticism of the president or his policy. But Waters and others lose all credibility when they treat Bush and bin Laden the same way. And that was before Waters announced he was beginning the "controversial" part of the show.

I held my breath as he introduced "Leaving Beirut" with a long-winded story about his teens. Then came:

Are these the people we should bomb

Are we so sure they mean us harm

Is this our pleasure, punishment or crime

Is this a mountain that we really want to climb

The road is hard, hard and long

Put down that two by four

This man would never turn you from his door

Oh, George! Oh, George!

That Texas education must have f------ you up when you were very small.

This is Waters' ridiculous ode to some guy who gave him a lift and a meal when he was hitching in Beirut at 17. According to the logic of his lyrics, because he received this courtesy, we're supposed to overlook the murder of innocents at the hands of radical Islam, including the close to 3,000 who died almost five years to the day, and just blocks from where I was hearing him sing.

I couldn't take it any more. "Go visit Ground Zero!" I shouted from the front row. He heard me, and proceeded to avoid our corner of the stage except to oblige a hottie who wanted to take his picture with her cell phone.

Then the pig came out.

I refer to a giant inflatable pig, a hallmark of many Floyd shows, and the symbol of my aforementioned favorite album. Only this time, the pig was a billboard for Waters' twisted priorities. "Habeas Corpus Matters," it said, among other things. How appalling. I wondered how many in the New York audience had lost relatives or friends in the 9/11 attack and now were witness to his call for more rights for the murderers?

"Go visit Ground Zero," I yelled again.

Roger Waters still has free-speech rights. Bald, bespectacled and willing to shell out for a front-row seat, so do I

Posted by Kathy | September 26, 2006 5:07 PM

Michael Smerconish | ROGER WATERS: THE PINKO IN FLOYDFOR THE second time in my life, I'm writing a column about Pink Floyd. Specifically, about the man I've always considered to be the brains of the band: Roger Waters. The first time I wrote about him was 26 years ago when I was a high school senior at Central Bucks West in Doylestown and editor of the school paper, the Chatterbux.

Back then, I was one of the lucky few to see Pink Floyd perform "The Wall," live at the Nassau County Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y. My review earned me an invitation to the principal's office. I was encouraged to write a retraction on the grounds that I'd promoted a band whose lyrics the principal associated with drug use.

It was a moment straight out of "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2," "We don't need no education" indeed. I told the principal to pound sand. Maybe even called it a matter of "free speech."

For three decades, the Floyd has never left my playlist.

In fact, I have done what I call "the cycle" for every Floyd and Roger Waters recording, meaning I bought it in all forms in which it was released: album, 8-track, cassette and CD. I once made a London taxi driver take me to the Battersea Power Station just so I could photograph the image that appears on the cover of my favorite album, "Animals." No one was more pleased when the band reunited to headline at Live 8. And in the never-ending debate among Floyd fans on David Gilmore vs. Rogers Waters, I've always sided with Waters.

My affinity for Waters has always been in spite of his politics. Chalk that up to spending too much time studying song lyrics back in the day when they printed such things. I thought rock stars had all the answers.

Fast-forward 25 years.

Last Wednesday, I sat in the front row for a Roger Waters performance at Madison Square Garden. (The same show came to the Tweeter Center in Camden Saturday night.) The crowd was diverse, but mostly like me: white middle-aged guys with receding hair and expanding waists.

It should have been a night to have a few beers and enjoy the soundtrack of my life. Instead, I sat there in my expensive seat, and heckled the guy whose music I know by heart.

Waters' politics are no longer just liberal, they're over the top.

I was expecting the line about "incurable tyrants and kings" when he sang "Fletcher Memorial Home," and I knew there'd be references to Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan.

What I wasn't prepared for was a photo montage featuring Osama, Saddam and George W. Bush. Especially not two days removed from the anniversary of Sept. 11 in the city where the most death and destruction occurred.

I'm sick and tired of entertainment types arguing a moral equivalency between our president and the Butcher of Baghdad and the architect of 9/11.

It's not that I object to the criticism of the president or his policy. But Waters and others lose all credibility when they treat Bush and bin Laden the same way. And that was before Waters announced he was beginning the "controversial" part of the show.

I held my breath as he introduced "Leaving Beirut" with a long-winded story about his teens. Then came:

Are these the people we should bomb

Are we so sure they mean us harm

Is this our pleasure, punishment or crime

Is this a mountain that we really want to climb

The road is hard, hard and long

Put down that two by four

This man would never turn you from his door

Oh, George! Oh, George!

That Texas education must have f------ you up when you were very small.

This is Waters' ridiculous ode to some guy who gave him a lift and a meal when he was hitching in Beirut at 17. According to the logic of his lyrics, because he received this courtesy, we're supposed to overlook the murder of innocents at the hands of radical Islam, including the close to 3,000 who died almost five years to the day, and just blocks from where I was hearing him sing.

I couldn't take it any more. "Go visit Ground Zero!" I shouted from the front row. He heard me, and proceeded to avoid our corner of the stage except to oblige a hottie who wanted to take his picture with her cell phone.

Then the pig came out.

I refer to a giant inflatable pig, a hallmark of many Floyd shows, and the symbol of my aforementioned favorite album. Only this time, the pig was a billboard for Waters' twisted priorities. "Habeas Corpus Matters," it said, among other things. How appalling. I wondered how many in the New York audience had lost relatives or friends in the 9/11 attack and now were witness to his call for more rights for the murderers?

"Go visit Ground Zero," I yelled again.

Roger Waters still has free-speech rights. Bald, bespectacled and willing to shell out for a front-row seat, so do I

Posted by Kathy | September 26, 2006 5:09 PM

Michael Smerconish | ROGER WATERS: THE PINKO IN FLOYDFOR THE second time in my life, I'm writing a column about Pink Floyd. Specifically, about the man I've always considered to be the brains of the band: Roger Waters. The first time I wrote about him was 26 years ago when I was a high school senior at Central Bucks West in Doylestown and editor of the school paper, the Chatterbux.

Back then, I was one of the lucky few to see Pink Floyd perform "The Wall," live at the Nassau County Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y. My review earned me an invitation to the principal's office. I was encouraged to write a retraction on the grounds that I'd promoted a band whose lyrics the principal associated with drug use.

It was a moment straight out of "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2," "We don't need no education" indeed. I told the principal to pound sand. Maybe even called it a matter of "free speech."

For three decades, the Floyd has never left my playlist.

In fact, I have done what I call "the cycle" for every Floyd and Roger Waters recording, meaning I bought it in all forms in which it was released: album, 8-track, cassette and CD. I once made a London taxi driver take me to the Battersea Power Station just so I could photograph the image that appears on the cover of my favorite album, "Animals." No one was more pleased when the band reunited to headline at Live 8. And in the never-ending debate among Floyd fans on David Gilmore vs. Rogers Waters, I've always sided with Waters.

My affinity for Waters has always been in spite of his politics. Chalk that up to spending too much time studying song lyrics back in the day when they printed such things. I thought rock stars had all the answers.

Fast-forward 25 years.

Last Wednesday, I sat in the front row for a Roger Waters performance at Madison Square Garden. (The same show came to the Tweeter Center in Camden Saturday night.) The crowd was diverse, but mostly like me: white middle-aged guys with receding hair and expanding waists.

It should have been a night to have a few beers and enjoy the soundtrack of my life. Instead, I sat there in my expensive seat, and heckled the guy whose music I know by heart.

Waters' politics are no longer just liberal, they're over the top.

I was expecting the line about "incurable tyrants and kings" when he sang "Fletcher Memorial Home," and I knew there'd be references to Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan.

What I wasn't prepared for was a photo montage featuring Osama, Saddam and George W. Bush. Especially not two days removed from the anniversary of Sept. 11 in the city where the most death and destruction occurred.

I'm sick and tired of entertainment types arguing a moral equivalency between our president and the Butcher of Baghdad and the architect of 9/11.

It's not that I object to the criticism of the president or his policy. But Waters and others lose all credibility when they treat Bush and bin Laden the same way. And that was before Waters announced he was beginning the "controversial" part of the show.

I held my breath as he introduced "Leaving Beirut" with a long-winded story about his teens. Then came:

Are these the people we should bomb

Are we so sure they mean us harm

Is this our pleasure, punishment or crime

Is this a mountain that we really want to climb

The road is hard, hard and long

Put down that two by four

This man would never turn you from his door

Oh, George! Oh, George!

That Texas education must have f------ you up when you were very small.

This is Waters' ridiculous ode to some guy who gave him a lift and a meal when he was hitching in Beirut at 17. According to the logic of his lyrics, because he received this courtesy, we're supposed to overlook the murder of innocents at the hands of radical Islam, including the close to 3,000 who died almost five years to the day, and just blocks from where I was hearing him sing.

I couldn't take it any more. "Go visit Ground Zero!" I shouted from the front row. He heard me, and proceeded to avoid our corner of the stage except to oblige a hottie who wanted to take his picture with her cell phone.

Then the pig came out.

I refer to a giant inflatable pig, a hallmark of many Floyd shows, and the symbol of my aforementioned favorite album. Only this time, the pig was a billboard for Waters' twisted priorities. "Habeas Corpus Matters," it said, among other things. How appalling. I wondered how many in the New York audience had lost relatives or friends in the 9/11 attack and now were witness to his call for more rights for the murderers?

"Go visit Ground Zero," I yelled again.

Roger Waters still has free-speech rights. Bald, bespectacled and willing to shell out for a front-row seat, so do I

Posted by Kathy | September 26, 2006 5:11 PM

Hey, Kathy, don't you read the newspapers...? or, do you just get Murdock's corporate media's spin about these rather important issues? Maybe if you could trouble yourself to pick up the NY Times and read Seymore Hirsch's columns...hmmm, oh well. What about Michael Moore's outstanding efforts to reveal the truth surrounding the Terrorist's attacks? Or is he just another "entertainment type"? What is an entertainmet type anyway? How does one still equate the Terrorist hit, as shocking as it is/was with the overthrowing and occupation of Iraq? What is taking up so much of your time that you cannot be more informed before you open your mouth? Why are you and the people like you in this forum so surprised even offended that someone has the guts to speak the Truth...Who else did the same thing and received the same reaction by people like you...huh? Well, since you don't have a clue, does "Living is easy with Eyes Closed, Misunderstanding all you see." Look what happened to him...Thanks Stuart, you were the only one who had anything to say. Good luck. I'm outta here...
Venus#9

Posted by venus9 | September 27, 2006 3:59 AM

Michael Smerconish | ROGER WATERS: THE PINKO IN FLOYDFOR THE second time in my life, I'm writing a column about Pink Floyd. Specifically, about the man I've always considered to be the brains of the band: Roger Waters. The first time I wrote about him was 26 years ago when I was a high school senior at Central Bucks West in Doylestown and editor of the school paper, the Chatterbux.

Back then, I was one of the lucky few to see Pink Floyd perform "The Wall," live at the Nassau County Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y. My review earned me an invitation to the principal's office. I was encouraged to write a retraction on the grounds that I'd promoted a band whose lyrics the principal associated with drug use.

It was a moment straight out of "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2," "We don't need no education" indeed. I told the principal to pound sand. Maybe even called it a matter of "free speech."

For three decades, the Floyd has never left my playlist.

In fact, I have done what I call "the cycle" for every Floyd and Roger Waters recording, meaning I bought it in all forms in which it was released: album, 8-track, cassette and CD. I once made a London taxi driver take me to the Battersea Power Station just so I could photograph the image that appears on the cover of my favorite album, "Animals." No one was more pleased when the band reunited to headline at Live 8. And in the never-ending debate among Floyd fans on David Gilmore vs. Rogers Waters, I've always sided with Waters.

My affinity for Waters has always been in spite of his politics. Chalk that up to spending too much time studying song lyrics back in the day when they printed such things. I thought rock stars had all the answers.

Fast-forward 25 years.

Last Wednesday, I sat in the front row for a Roger Waters performance at Madison Square Garden. (The same show came to the Tweeter Center in Camden Saturday night.) The crowd was diverse, but mostly like me: white middle-aged guys with receding hair and expanding waists.

It should have been a night to have a few beers and enjoy the soundtrack of my life. Instead, I sat there in my expensive seat, and heckled the guy whose music I know by heart.

Waters' politics are no longer just liberal, they're over the top.

I was expecting the line about "incurable tyrants and kings" when he sang "Fletcher Memorial Home," and I knew there'd be references to Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan.

What I wasn't prepared for was a photo montage featuring Osama, Saddam and George W. Bush. Especially not two days removed from the anniversary of Sept. 11 in the city where the most death and destruction occurred.

I'm sick and tired of entertainment types arguing a moral equivalency between our president and the Butcher of Baghdad and the architect of 9/11.

It's not that I object to the criticism of the president or his policy. But Waters and others lose all credibility when they treat Bush and bin Laden the same way. And that was before Waters announced he was beginning the "controversial" part of the show.

I held my breath as he introduced "Leaving Beirut" with a long-winded story about his teens. Then came:

Are these the people we should bomb

Are we so sure they mean us harm

Is this our pleasure, punishment or crime

Is this a mountain that we really want to climb

The road is hard, hard and long

Put down that two by four

This man would never turn you from his door

Oh, George! Oh, George!

That Texas education must have f------ you up when you were very small.

This is Waters' ridiculous ode to some guy who gave him a lift and a meal when he was hitching in Beirut at 17. According to the logic of his lyrics, because he received this courtesy, we're supposed to overlook the murder of innocents at the hands of radical Islam, including the close to 3,000 who died almost five years to the day, and just blocks from where I was hearing him sing.

I couldn't take it any more. "Go visit Ground Zero!" I shouted from the front row. He heard me, and proceeded to avoid our corner of the stage except to oblige a hottie who wanted to take his picture with her cell phone.

Then the pig came out.

I refer to a giant inflatable pig, a hallmark of many Floyd shows, and the symbol of my aforementioned favorite album. Only this time, the pig was a billboard for Waters' twisted priorities. "Habeas Corpus Matters," it said, among other things. How appalling. I wondered how many in the New York audience had lost relatives or friends in the 9/11 attack and now were witness to his call for more rights for the murderers?

"Go visit Ground Zero," I yelled again.

Roger Waters still has free-speech rights. Bald, bespectacled and willing to shell out for a front-row seat, so do I

Posted by Venus9 | September 27, 2006 1:02 PM

Michael Smerconish | ROGER WATERS: THE PINKO IN FLOYDFOR THE second time in my life, I'm writing a column about Pink Floyd. Specifically, about the man I've always considered to be the brains of the band: Roger Waters. The first time I wrote about him was 26 years ago when I was a high school senior at Central Bucks West in Doylestown and editor of the school paper, the Chatterbux.

Back then, I was one of the lucky few to see Pink Floyd perform "The Wall," live at the Nassau County Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y. My review earned me an invitation to the principal's office. I was encouraged to write a retraction on the grounds that I'd promoted a band whose lyrics the principal associated with drug use.

It was a moment straight out of "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2," "We don't need no education" indeed. I told the principal to pound sand. Maybe even called it a matter of "free speech."

For three decades, the Floyd has never left my playlist.

In fact, I have done what I call "the cycle" for every Floyd and Roger Waters recording, meaning I bought it in all forms in which it was released: album, 8-track, cassette and CD. I once made a London taxi driver take me to the Battersea Power Station just so I could photograph the image that appears on the cover of my favorite album, "Animals." No one was more pleased when the band reunited to headline at Live 8. And in the never-ending debate among Floyd fans on David Gilmore vs. Rogers Waters, I've always sided with Waters.

My affinity for Waters has always been in spite of his politics. Chalk that up to spending too much time studying song lyrics back in the day when they printed such things. I thought rock stars had all the answers.

Fast-forward 25 years.

Last Wednesday, I sat in the front row for a Roger Waters performance at Madison Square Garden. (The same show came to the Tweeter Center in Camden Saturday night.) The crowd was diverse, but mostly like me: white middle-aged guys with receding hair and expanding waists.

It should have been a night to have a few beers and enjoy the soundtrack of my life. Instead, I sat there in my expensive seat, and heckled the guy whose music I know by heart.

Waters' politics are no longer just liberal, they're over the top.

I was expecting the line about "incurable tyrants and kings" when he sang "Fletcher Memorial Home," and I knew there'd be references to Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan.

What I wasn't prepared for was a photo montage featuring Osama, Saddam and George W. Bush. Especially not two days removed from the anniversary of Sept. 11 in the city where the most death and destruction occurred.

I'm sick and tired of entertainment types arguing a moral equivalency between our president and the Butcher of Baghdad and the architect of 9/11.

It's not that I object to the criticism of the president or his policy. But Waters and others lose all credibility when they treat Bush and bin Laden the same way. And that was before Waters announced he was beginning the "controversial" part of the show.

I held my breath as he introduced "Leaving Beirut" with a long-winded story about his teens. Then came:

Are these the people we should bomb

Are we so sure they mean us harm

Is this our pleasure, punishment or crime

Is this a mountain that we really want to climb

The road is hard, hard and long

Put down that two by four

This man would never turn you from his door

Oh, George! Oh, George!

That Texas education must have f------ you up when you were very small.

This is Waters' ridiculous ode to some guy who gave him a lift and a meal when he was hitching in Beirut at 17. According to the logic of his lyrics, because he received this courtesy, we're supposed to overlook the murder of innocents at the hands of radical Islam, including the close to 3,000 who died almost five years to the day, and just blocks from where I was hearing him sing.

I couldn't take it any more. "Go visit Ground Zero!" I shouted from the front row. He heard me, and proceeded to avoid our corner of the stage except to oblige a hottie who wanted to take his picture with her cell phone.

Then the pig came out.

I refer to a giant inflatable pig, a hallmark of many Floyd shows, and the symbol of my aforementioned favorite album. Only this time, the pig was a billboard for Waters' twisted priorities. "Habeas Corpus Matters," it said, among other things. How appalling. I wondered how many in the New York audience had lost relatives or friends in the 9/11 attack and now were witness to his call for more rights for the murderers?

"Go visit Ground Zero," I yelled again.

Roger Waters still has free-speech rights. Bald, bespectacled and willing to shell out for a front-row seat, so do I

Posted by Venus9 | September 27, 2006 1:03 PM

What the Left Never Will Understand About the War on Terror by JB Williams
Posted by The Bear under Global War on Terrorism

The first thing liberals fail to understand is that war is a serious business. If you are not prepared to take a side, you had better not stand in the middle of the battle field. Sit it out and remain silent, because the minute you speak, you have taken a side, whether you meant to or not, and if you speak against your own, you have chosen the wrong side. This error in judgment among liberals has earned them the current title of un-American or even Al Qaeda sympathizer.

Wrong from the start, the left actually thinks that the war on international terrorism is all about one man, one terror network, one event, one country and one day. How many liberals have you heard ask the question, “What about Bin Laden?” or, “What did Iraq do to us?” or, refer to Iraq as the “wrong war” in the “wrong place”, a “departure from the war on terror” - a war which in their feeble minds, exists only in Afghanistan.

This notion is akin to suggesting that WWII was only about Pearl Harbor. Like Pearl Harbor, 9/11 was just a calling card, an invitation to engage in a much bigger (world) problem. Like Pearl Harbor, 9/11 was not our first invitation to engage in what was fast becoming a world-wide threat. Like Pearl Harbor, it was an invitation we couldn’t afford to leave unanswered.

We received an invitation to the war on terror as far back as 1979 in Tehran. We received several more invitations throughout the 80’s and 90’s. We were invited in no uncertain terms in 1993, when Bin Laden first attempted to level the World Trade Towers. We were invited again in 1995 by Hezbollah in Saudi Arabia and yet again by Bin Laden in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998. We received yet another open invitation to join the war against international terrorism in October of 2000 with the bombing of the USS Cole, again, courtesy of Al Qaeda. Meanwhile, much of the free world was already engaged. We declined to answer any of these invitations_

We were not just patient in ignoring these invitations - we were cowardly and short sighted. Only when the invitation reached the massive intensity of 9/11, with nearly 3000 innocent American men, women and children dead, our financial center, defense center and government center under attack all at once, were we ready to accept these invitations.

A year before 9/11, the FBI had identified the New York Al Qaeda cell that would one year later, fly planes into the WTC, the Pentagon and even the White House, if not for the brave souls on Flight 93. But the Clinton administration looked at the threat as a “criminal” matter. That meant that the FBI and CIA could not share information concerning the New York cell
and without proper warrants based on indisputable evidence, they did nothing.

One year later, that cell killed almost 3000 American citizens with apparent ease and liberals still contend today, that the war on terror is a “criminal” matter. They insist that the terrorists have civil rights and that our courts, filled with frivolous law suits, is the place to deal with this threat.

Despite numerous attacks and arrests all over the world, liberals still think that the war on international terrorism is limited to one man, Bin Laden, one network, Al Qaeda and one event, 9/11. Had we thought the same after Pearl Harbor, we would have leveled Japan and come home. Most of
Europe would be speaking German and every Jew on earth would be baked to extinction. Most of the world would be living under communist rule and America would not be America today.

Yet the leftists in control of the once great Democratic Party fail to see reality. When they search for the enemy, they only see Bush. When they plot their military strategy, they only see defeat. When you ask them about terrorists, they think you are talking about American soldiers and when you ask for their victory plans, retreat is their answer. The retreat plan was tried in Vietnam and we are still trying to justify that decision today.

Prior to the Clinton administration, dangerous regimes like that in North Korea, Syria, China and Iran, had the desire but not the means to strike terror world-wide. By the time the Clinton’s left office, both China and North Korea had long range nuclear warheads, Iran and Syria were working on it. But liberals will tell you that Bush made America less safe, answering
the invitation and taking the fight to the enemy on their soil. Has there been another successful attack in the US that I am unaware of? Not that it can’t still happen. That’s really the point. It can still happen and if we don’t get more serious about winning this war, it will.

The Hussein regime in Iraq had terrorized its citizens and neighbors throughout the 90’s, broken every UN resolution ever written and played cat and mouse with UN inspectors until Hussein finally got bold enough to just toss them from Iraq, telling both Clinton and the UN to shove it. But according to leftists, they had Hussein “contained”. Doing UN paper work I guess?

Today, as we head into the 2006 mid-term elections, liberals remind us that they have changed their collective minds about none of this. They still think the world wide war against international terrorism is about one man, one terror network, one country, one event and one day. They still believe
it is a criminal matter for our police and our courts and they still insist that America, more specifically Bush and our military, are the real terrorists. They still believe that Bush lied, that Iranian, Syrian and Arabian terrorists killing innocent Iraqi citizens are just “civil insurgents” and that the central front in the war on terror, is a departure from the war on terror.

Now if you can sleep well at night with your families’ lives in the hands of people like this, God Bless! Knock yourself out at election time. Vote yourself more money from the federal trough of socialist handouts and let the chips fall where they may on national security.

But if on the other hand, like me, you have something to lose, something worth fighting for, someone to pass this country on to in one piece, then pay attention.

Clearly, liberals don’t get it. They don’t like Bush’s war because they can’t begin to comprehend the very real world wide threat that Bush decided to confront on September 12, 2001. They don’t get it because unlike the rest of us, they see more wrong than right with America and therefore, nothing worthy of defense. They won’t fight because they don’t know how and that limits their thinking to faux diplomacy via the most corrupt institution on earth, the United Nations.

They fear Bush more than Bin Laden. They trust those European nations that profited by keeping the most brutal regime on earth in business while holding the UN and US hostage as the international terror threat gathered global strength and reach. They trust the UN more than the US and firmly believe that we can negotiate peace with Muslim extremists willing to strap bombs on the chests of their grade school children and send them into a pizza parlor.

In short, liberals don’t know anything at all about real American values or principles today and they know even less about what it takes to protect and preserve those principles and values for future generations. Therefore, the idea that they can be entrusted with upholding, protecting, defending and preserving the very principles that they spend every day attacking, is insane. But if insanity is your thing_go for it!

NO! They just don’t get it_ any of it - and apparently, no matter the mountain of evidence before them, they never will.

Those they have trained to be federal dependents will vote for them no matter what. Those who can’t tell the difference between an American soldier and a real terrorist will vote for them too. Those who can’t read a butterfly ballot will vote for them. So will those just released from prison and even those without a pulse.

People who believe that Americas “bubble of supremacy” needs to be “burst”, like billionaire socialist and currency wrecker George Soros will fund them, as will Hollywood limousine liberals, New England ketchup queens and tree dwelling former draft-dodgers in the North West.

And that’s why the rest of us better show up on Election Day.

Posted by venus9 | September 27, 2006 1:24 PM

Isn't there another forum for this whole left vs. right bullshit? Stop cutting and pasting your rhetoric (left OR right) here! You've got the entire internet to argue in!

Posted by klaus_kinski | September 27, 2006 1:42 PM

Went to the Camden NJ concert the other week - Roger is an ASSHOLE! I hope the Beirut family that helped him was killed by American gunfire!

Fuck off and DIE Roger!

Posted by Pink Flower | September 28, 2006 1:27 PM

I agree... a major asshole.

Posted by Kelly | September 28, 2006 4:50 PM

I live in Indianapolis and he is scheduled to be here on 9-30-06 Sat night. I have been looking at tickets on these scalper sites and have not decided whether or not to spend $250-400 to go see the show or just get lawn tickets for $50. I am a HUGE PINK FLOYD fan and am looking forward to seeing some floyd music live. I am not sure how I would react to his USA bashing because I hate muslims but I also know that Bush is no church boy. I voted for Bush but he has pissed me off a lot in his terms. The whole censorship thanks to janet Jackson is a bunch of bs. Therefore, I think that roger has the right to express his views as it just makes you think one way or the other BUT whoever doesn't realize that the Muslim world is full of a bunch of NUTS is obviously crazy themselves. How many religions out there where if you do not want to belong to their belief system then they want to cut your head off. The answer is only 1-----Islam!!! I grew up Pentecostal and have many Catholic friends and if I didn't want to be catholic......guess what......THEY DIDN'T CALL ME AN INFIDEL and try and cut my head off. Islam is a violent religion.........or whatever you want to call it. Long Live The Pope and PINK FLOYD. Just Remember that FLOYD IS GOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by steve | September 28, 2006 8:18 PM

"Just Remember that FLOYD IS GOD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

Steve, the next time you're in confession you'd better 'fess up to writing that, then perform some penance. I'm pretty sure that the Pope would say you'll go to hell if you don't.

Posted by NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition! | September 28, 2006 9:08 PM

I saw the show September 30, 2006 at Verizon Wireless Center in Noblesville, Indianapolis; whichever you prefer! I vowed I would never return to Verizon after my last experience in which I only saw four songs performed by Fleetwood Mac because it took security so long to take care of assigning my parking and ensuring that I was not a security risk! I could not pass on Roger Waters though, and I am thrilled that I went. Getting into the facility was seamless and quick and the show was the most fantastic I have seen. The performances were near euphoric and the special effects and sound system were phenominal. If there were ever one show to pick to see in a lifetime this one would be the one. I stand in awe!

Posted by Cindy | October 1, 2006 2:26 AM

i went to the indy show last night as well. after all the crap i read on here i was prepared for a boo vs. standing ovation battle. fortunately i never heard one boo. the show was outstanding, never once offensive, and "leaving beirut" was at worst a song i could've used as a good excuse to go to the restroom. i didn't see any pictures of george bush next to saddam or bin laden and since when does any human being not reserve the right to criticize the president of the united states? have you stayed up past your bedtime to see leno or letterman? perhaps the daily show or the colbert report? it's a god-given right to criticize. all of you right winger freakouts need to take a deep breath and get a drink of water.
mark said, "i'm never going to listen to his material again".... because he said something you didn't agree with? WTF? do all of your family and friends think like you? did you and your family sit around and watch the "what to think" network? are you kidding me? grow up! it was an pound of music and maybe a pinch of a message. if you don't agree with the message, get a beer or take a piss, but please, shut the fuck up with your "i'll never listen to his material again" shit. you sound like you need a diaper change.
on a lighter note it was one of the best shows i'd ever seen. worst-case senario, it'll be the only time i ever see a member of pink floyd playing pink floyd material. contrary to mark, i may never take animals, wish you were here, or meddle out of my player again!
to mr. waters, thanks for the great time. i appreciate you.

Posted by Dan | October 1, 2006 2:50 PM

Pretty funny how Dan says "it's a god-given right to criticize". He then proceeds to bash a person who criticizes Roger Waters and prefers not to listen to his (Waters) music anymore. Typical left-wing thinking.

Posted by marilyn | October 2, 2006 12:39 PM

Thanks Roger for an unforgettable experience!!! The show was euphoric and give it up to the ladies! I sat front and center and what a great energy coming from the stage.

IMPEACH BUSH!!!!

Posted by Mirnanda | October 2, 2006 4:37 PM

Thanks Roger for an unforgettable experience!!! The show was euphoric and give it up to the ladies! I sat front and center and what a great energy coming from the stage.

IMPEACH BUSH!!!!

Posted by Miranda | October 2, 2006 4:38 PM

DONT LET THE MIGHT OF THE CHRISTIAN REICH FUCK IT UP FOR YOU AND THE REST OF THE WORLD !!!

Posted by Chris Perkins | October 2, 2006 5:09 PM

marilyn, i don't see one stating that s/he'd never listen to roger waters' material again as criticizing. i welcome mark to state he didn't like the part that was anti-bush or anti-war. but saying he'd never listen to his material is more of a pious threat, like roger waters would really notice a difference in his pride (or paycheck). i most certainly bashed mark, but not for criticizing roger waters. pretty funny how you make up your own bullshit then proceed to post it for everyone to see. typical right wing thinking.

Posted by Dan | October 2, 2006 7:53 PM

Just saw the Roger Waters show last night here in Phoenix. WOW!!!! Roger is quite obviously THE most highly evolved musical artist there is. No one today is even half-capable of succeeding him - Probably not ever! Everyone else I've seen (save for David Gilmour in LA) PALES.
As for his new "Leaving Beirut" song.
The folks calling him "anti-American" or "unsympathetic" to what's happening in the middle east now have COMPLETELY missed the point of this song. His experience of an incredibly caring man and woman taking him in and giving him their food and their bed to sleep in was touching and hopefully made us all realize that no matter what our governments try to sell us - there is still good and bad in every corner of the world. We're all the same! For it is our governments and our beliefs that fuck it all up for the rest of us.
They have too much rope! Anyone one who could not get that meaning from that song is myopic and probably from Texas.

Posted by Harry | October 4, 2006 3:23 PM

Where did the Pig from the Phoenix Concert on Oct. 3, 2006 land?

Posted by Bill Lee D Nye | October 5, 2006 2:14 PM

Where did the Pig from the Phoenix Concert on Oct. 3, 2006 land?

Posted by Bill Lee D Nye | October 5, 2006 2:14 PM

In Hillary's huge vagina.

Posted by sara | October 5, 2006 2:56 PM

What do Harvard president Larry Summers, Taliban John Walker, Delta Airlines officials and the editors of the New York Times have in common with Yanomamo tribeswomen in the Amazon jungle?
To answer this question is to understand the root cause of liberal "white guilt." Lakes of ink have been splashed on newspaper, magazine and journal pages ruminating and anguishing over the bottomless guilt that pervades the liberal soul.

Paul Craig Roberts, economist and columnist, writes eloquently about the anti-white racism endemic in American universities that demonizes white males as the font of all evil. Shelby Steele of the Hoover Institute explained in the Wall Street Journal recently how white guilt empowers racist frauds such as Cornel West.

The self-loathing of the white American liberal is as well-established and documented as Einstein's Special Relativity theorems. A typical example is writer Susan Sontag's denouncement of the white race as "the cancer of human history."

A racist hatred of one's own race – auto-racism – has become a defining characteristic of the liberal mind. Yet the source of such suicidal guilt remains a mystery.

Clearly understanding what disables liberals from wanting to defend their culture is today a mortal necessity – an absolute requirement if America is to be preserved and protected from Moslem terrorists and other folk desirous of her demise.

Exploitation and Black Magic

For such understanding, we need to travel to the Amazon. Among the Yanomamo and other tribes deep in the Amazon rain forests still adhering to the ancient hunting-gathering lifestyle practiced by our Paleolithic ancestors, it is an accepted practice that when a woman gives birth, she tearfully proclaims her child to be ugly.

In a loud, mortified lament that the entire tribe can hear, she asks why the gods have cursed her with such a pathetically repulsive infant. She does this in order to ward off the envious black magic of the Evil Eye, the Mal Ojo, that would be directed at her by her fellow tribespeople if they knew how happy she was with her beautiful baby.

Anthropologists observe that for most primitive and traditional cultures, "every individual lives in constant fear of the magical aggression of others ... there is only one explanation for unforeseen events: the envious black magic of another villager."

Reflect for a moment on the extent to which tribespeople in a tribal, "primitive" culture suffuse their lives with superstition, witchcraft, sorcery, voodoo, "black magic," the "evil eye." The world for them is teeming with demons, spirits, ghosts and gods, all of whom are malicious and dangerous -- in a word, envious.

A great many, if not the majority, of tribal or traditional cultures, whether in the Amazon, Africa or the Pacific, have no concept of natural death. Death is always murder.

For the Shuara Jivaro of the eastern Amazon, the first tribe I ever stayed with, there are three ways to die: actual murder (such as a spear through your stomach); demon-murder (accidental death, such as being killed by a falling tree in a storm or by snakebite, which the Jivaros see as perpetrated by a demon); or witchcraft murder (death by illness or unexplained causes, perpetrated by an envious sorcerer).

The Jivaro, just like the Tiv in Nigeria, the Aritama in Colombia, the Dobua in Micronesia, the Navaho in the Southwest U.S. and the tribal mind in general, attribute any illness or misfortune to the envious black magic of a personal enemy.

Envy is the source of tribal and traditional cultures' belief in Black Magic, the fear of the envious Evil Eye.

The fundamental reason why certain cultures remain static and never evolve (e.g., present-day villages in Egypt and India that have stayed pretty much the same for millennia) is the overwhelming extent to which the lives of the people within them are dominated by envy and envy avoidance: as anthropologists call it, the envy barrier.

For the Mambwe in Zambia, for example, "successful men are regarded as sinister, supernatural and dangerous." In Mexican villages, "fear of other people's envy determines every detail of life, every proposed action."

Members of a Hispanic "ghetto" in a community in Colorado "equate success with betrayal of the group; whoever works his way up socially and economically is regarded as a 'man who has sold himself to the Anglos,' someone 'who climbs on the backs of his own people.' "

It is an ultimate irony of modern times that left-wing Marxist-type intellectuals consider themselves to be in the progressive vanguard of sophisticated contemporary thought -- when in reality their thinking is nothing but an atavism, a regression to a primitive tribal mentality. What the Left calls "exploitation" is what anthropologists call "black magic."

As sociologist Helmut Schoeck summarizes in his seminal work, "Envy: A Theory of Human Behavior" (and who collected the above anthropologists' observations):

A self-pitying inclination to contemplate another's superiority or advantages, combined with a vague belief in his being the cause of one's own deprivation, is also to be found among educated members of our modern societies who really ought to know better. The primitive people's belief in black magic differs little from modern ideas. Whereas the socialist believes himself robbed by the employer, just as the politician in a developing country believes himself robbed by the industrial countries, so primitive man believes himself robbed by his neighbor, the latter having succeeded by black magic in spiriting away to his own fields part of the former's harvest.
The primitive atavism of left-wing bromides like "the rich get richer and the poor get poorer" is best illustrated by arguing that one can be healthy only at the expense of others. That in order to be in superior health, bursting with energy and vitality, one has to make someone else sick or in poor health -- just as in order to be rich you have to make others poor.

The healthy are healthy because they unjustly exploited and ripped off the sick, spiriting away the sick's fair share of health with black magic. In fact, the sick are sick because the healthy are healthy. If this is absurd, then claiming the poor are poor because they have been exploited by the rich is equally absurd.

Fear of Being Envied

Pandering to the envious, and intimidating those who are afraid of them, has been the path to power of all modern demagogues, from Lenin and Hitler to Yassir Arafat and Osama bin Laden.

The three great political pathologies of the 20th century are all religions of envy: Nazism, preaching race envy toward "rich, exploitative Jews"; Communism, preaching class envy toward the "rich, exploitative bourgeoisie"; and Moslem terrorism, preaching culture envy toward the "rich, exploitative West."

Envy-mongering has always been and continues to be the underlying strategy of all variants of the political Left, such as the Democratic Party. What a Yanomamo woman calls "black magic" and a Marxist professor at Harvard calls "exploitation," Tom Daschle calls "tax break for the rich."

So here we discover the secret fear at the source of the suicidal liberal mind. It is envy that makes a Nazi, a Communist or a terrorist. It is the fear of being envied that makes a liberal and is the source of "liberal guilt."

This is most easily seen in the children of wealthy parents. Successful businessmen, for example, who have made it on their own normally have a respect for the effort and the economic system that makes success possible.

Their children, who have not had to work for it, are easier targets for guilt-mongering by the envious. So they assume a posture of liberal compassion as an envy-deflection device: "Please don't envy me for my father's money -- look at all the liberal causes and government social programs I advocate!"

Teddy Kennedy is the archetype of this phenomenon.

This is also why Hollywood is so liberal. The vast amounts of money movie stars make is so grossly disproportionate to the effort it took them to make it that they feel it is unearned. So they apologize for it. The liberal's strategy is to apologize for his success in order to appease the envious.

Liberalism is thus not a political ideology or set of beliefs. It is an envy-deflection device, a psychological strategy to avoid being envied.

Then there are those who are terrified of envy even though they have earned success themselves. Many Jews are liberals because such lethal envy has been directed at Jews for so many centuries that it is little wonder they consider avoiding envy to be a necessity of life.

One definitive characteristic of both envy and the fear of it is masochism. Envy is not simply hatred of someone for having something you don't -- it is the willingness to masochistically give up any chance of ever having that something yourself as long as the person you are envious of doesn't get to have it either.

Similarly, the more one fears being envied, the more one is driven to masochistic self-humiliation in attempts at envy appeasement.

The Masochism of Liberals

It is possible to perceive the passions of the Left as frenzies of masochism. What could be more idiotic and masochistic than to oppose missile defense? This opposition cannot be understood unless one dispenses with its rhetoric and rationales and realizes that these folks at their emotional core do not want their country defended.

The lunacy of the "global warming" hoax cannot be comprehended other than that its masochistic advocates do not want their civilization to prosper. The culture-destroying immigration policies that Pat Buchanan warns are causing "The Death of the West" were put in place by those who do not want their culture to survive.

The lethality of liberal envy appeasement is that personally felt guilt is projected onto the various social or tribal collectives to which the liberal belongs and are a part of his self-identity. Self-loathing is transformed into a loathing of one's society or race.

White male liberals become auto-racist and auto-sexist: racist toward their own race, sexist toward their own sex. Dime-store demagogues like eco-fascist environmentalists, feminazis, animal and homosexual rights types, race hustlers like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton all get their strength from the liberals' fear of their Evil Eyes.

As the Amazon tribeswoman who says her baby is ugly, so the white male liberal says his gender, his race, his country, his civilization and even his entire species is ugly.

I began to realize how liberal envy appeasement is the root of the problem when I was speaking at colleges back in the 1980s about anti-Soviet resistance movements in Soviet colonies such as Nicaragua, Angola, Mozambique and Afghanistan.

Students would invariably turn a discussion of Soviet imperialism into an assertion of moral equivalence between the USA and the USSR: "How can you criticize the Soviets when we're just as bad? What about what we did to the Indians?" I would be asked.

"I haven't done anything to the Indians," I replied. "What have you done to them?"

"But we stole their land!"

"OK -- let's give it back. And let's start with your property. To what tribe do you want your family's home to go? What tribe gets your stereo?"

Once I couldn't stand being heckled by a particularly loud and petulant student leftist any longer. I lost my temper and said to him: "Look, man, if you're into masochism, find some chick with long black hair who's into whips and chains and have her beat the hell out of you. Just don't take it out on your country."

Rejecting Envy

The future of our economy, our culture and our civilization depends on an antidote to the corrosive social poisons of envy and envy appeasement. That antidote was first provided by Aristotle in the 4th century bc.

The antidote to envy is emulation.

In the "Rhetoric" (ca. 350 bc), Aristotle distinguishes the two: "Zelos, emulation, is a good thing and characteristic of good people, while phthonos, envy, is bad and characteristic of the bad; for the former, through emulation, are making an effort to attain good things for themselves, while the latter, through envy, try to prevent their neighbors from having them." ("Rhetoric," 2.10.1)

Aristotle invokes the ancient wisdom of his 8th century (bc) predecessor Hesiod:

There is not one kind of Eris (Strife), but all over the earth there are two. One fosters evil war and battle, being cruel. The other is the elder daughter of dark Night, and she is far kinder to men. She stirs up even the shiftless to toil. For a man grows eager to work when he considers his neighbor, a rich man who hastens to plough and plant and put his house in good order. Thus neighbor vies with neighbor to hurry after wealth. This Strife is wholesome for men. ("Works and Days," 11-24)
Aristotle concludes that "Whereas phthonos, envy, is censured because it seeks to harm another, zelos, emulation, is praised because it encourages a person to attain excellence on his own merits." ("Rhetoric," 2.11.1)

Fear of envy is very deep-seated in the human psyche. It can prevent a culture from progressing for thousands of years. Only a youthful culture full of vigor and confidence can shrug it off, enabling that culture to flourish. The road to cultural ruin lies in the fear of envy reasserting itself from the primordial depths.

America once had that youth, vigor and confidence, culminating in history's single greatest achievement, putting a man on the moon.

After the triply debilitating debacles of Vietnam, Watergate and Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan resurrected America's self-confidence, with America's resultant victory in the Cold War.

Yet America lost her way once more, indulging in a cultural debauch epitomized by the Clintons. America's response to the atrocity of Sept. 11 provided overwhelming evidence that her reserves of vitality and self-assurance remain abundant.

Those reserves are nonetheless depleted. America's most elite universities have degenerated into fascist cesspools of envy appeasement. They survive only on the inertia of their prestige. Delta and other airlines compromise passenger security by harassing people at random rather than racially profiling Arab and other Moslem men.

Indeed, the entire phenomenon of political correctness -- perhaps best exemplified by the New York Times editorial page -- is nothing but a massive exercise in envy appeasement.

One of the most positive results of Sept. 11 is that it has made the American people mad enough to reject envy. They now could care less if Moslems or the French or whomever are envious of them. That rejection must now be applied to the envy panderers and envy appeasers within America herself.

Rejecting envy is the key to preventing "The Death of the West," the key for America to continue to prosper. I suggest that this rejection begin with you.

Fear of the Evil Eye is the only thing that gives the Evil Eye any power. Without fear of it, the Evil Eye is impotent. So, the next time Evil Eyes are directed at you and demand you apologize for your existence, you might suggest that they indulge in S&M by themselves and leave you out of it.

Posted by CaRoL | October 6, 2006 11:35 PM

what the hell did any of that have to do with a roger waters show?

Posted by Dan | October 7, 2006 1:00 PM

typical right-wing thinking.

At the end of the day, any person with intelligence can make their own minds up for themselves - regardless of what's being sold to them by the media etc.

There is a fundamental difference between right and wrong. I am a Roman Catholic, and my God would never have asked George Bush to invade or kill, even if it wasn't for oil (which, by the way if you still in denial then you are out of your mind, and a product of a shit-brain society, merely regurgitating the bullshit you have been spoonfed for your entire existence.)

No, my God would never ask anyone to do so. I'm entirely familiar with the American Christian right, their spin-off religions and their wield on government power.

The difference between these folk and I, is that I would believe what I believe in, and I don't try to impose my beliefs and way of life to others, state isn't religion, it's that simple.

Anyway, yes, there is a clear difference between right and wrong.

Well, do ya radiate cold shards of broker glass?

You houseproud town-mouse, of course you do!

haha, Charade you are!

Posted by Stuart Milligan | October 8, 2006 1:19 PM

Stuart, what is "broker" glass? I love this chat about what ones God would do... let's think about all the nut-bars over there that are killing people FOR their God. Get a clue. Went to the show on 10/06... very nice show short of the misguided political rhetoric. Long live pink Floyd!

Posted by Fran | October 9, 2006 12:02 PM

I saw the Roger Waters show at the Shoreline Amphitheatre last night, and it was outstanding. The sound quality was as it should be - a swirl of speakers immersing us all in the middle of the music. "Leaving Beruit" was interesting, and we only heard cheers. Never saw Pink Floyd before, but this was the next best thing!

Posted by FreeThinker | October 11, 2006 2:08 PM

Roger Waters, of Pink Floyd fame, played today in the San Francisco Bay area leaving two firm impressions, one sadder than the other. First, he showed us a man of rapidly declining skills who apparently owes much more to his Pink Floyd former friends than we ever realized. A poster boy for a mandatory retirement age for 60's rockers he is. Second, he feels very comfortable and righteous in subjecting his audiences to his enlightened political views.

Flanked by a band devoid of greatness but plentiful in mediocrity--probably by design so as not to upstage its fragile leader--Waters trod mostly through Pink Floyd classic tracks alongside a few of his solo works. Straining to sing with a voice that is long gone, choosing arrangements worthy of the easy-listening channel, and performing with the soul of a Kinkade still life came all together as a relentless slaughter of the mythical Floyd songs. One cannot but wonder if Waters, after being on the losing end of a much public and bitter breakup dispute with Pink Floyd, has now embarked on a carefully planned crusade to destroy the legacy of the band.

Had we only had to lament but music here, we could all have gone back home mourning about what once was. But no. Mr. Waters has decided to join the cast of artists who feel entitled by their fame, certainly not by their knowledge or education, to convert the stage into a pulpit and their audiences into captive subjects of their regal thoughts. We wonder how many people would have showed up at the concert venue had it been advertised as Roger Water's Anti-War, Anti-Bush show, as it would have been the honest thing to do. Honesty, or lack of it, is however of no concern to Mr. Waters unless of course it pertains to George Bush.

In "Makes Perfect Sense (when you express it in dollars and cents)", Waters patiently explains to us how the Iraq war is all about oil and money, just in case we have never heard that argument. To make sure that we all poor uninformed souls realize whose fault the whole mess is, the accompanying video projection shows a series of portraits of the great criminals in history, Stalin, Mussolini, Genghis Khan, Kim Jong Il, and of course George Bush.

That song is only a prelude to his central piece, "Leaving Beirut", which supposedly has to do with how well an Arab couple once treated him when he was a teenager traveling in Lebanon. Lest nobody in the audience had bought his solo albums or could understand the lyrics from his rasping voice, the video projection screen played the subtitles. Perhaps in his dreams, Waters imagined the audience singing along like in a Daily Kos reunion.

The lyrics were, well, a compendium in 'I hate Bush'. First, he tells Bush that "Oh George! Oh George! That Texas education must have f****d you up when you were very small". Mr. Waters apparently has ample contempt for the people of Texas and their educational system, which in his appraisal, produces nothing more than inbred criminals. Waters proceeds by equating Bush with "Son of Sam" and tells us that "America" has many great things but "Don't let the might, the Christian right, f**ck it all up For you and the rest of the world". Waters, a British subject, seems to suffer from a severe case of King George syndrome that leads him to rule from his English throne on how people should behave in the colonies.

Not content with indoctrinating via his solo works, Waters pollutes the Floyd classics by injecting political images that are completely out of place in the originals. Thus, we see in "Sheeps" the famous flying-pig prop adorned with messages such as "Impeach Bush Now" and "Vote on Nov. 7" while flying over the audience. In "The Wall" tracks, the video projection shows us walls full of "shame on Bush" and other colorful, anti-Bush slogans.

The use of the Pink Floyd name and its music for political purposes by Waters is dishonest and unethical, particularly since he has lost in court all rights to the band name and image. His thoughts, well, we will just have to consider how much clarity is left in a mind after a life of LSD, booze, and late night work, parties and women. His subjecting an unsuspecting paying audience to his banter surely tells a lot about the morals of a man who complains about the morals of others.

Roger Waters owes everything he has in life to the system, values, and culture in which he has lived. A system, values and culture for which many men and women have given their lives now and in the past. None of the work he has created would have been possible had he lived in a different culture. It is ironic to think what would happen if Mr. Waters went to Pakistan and told his audience "Pakistan is great but don't let the might, the Islamic right, f**k it all up for you and the rest of the world".

To the classic question of "By the way, which one is Pink?", we now know it is not Roger Waters

Posted by Love | October 11, 2006 7:39 PM

FUCK YOU ROGER WATERS... YOUR SHOW SUCKED AND SO DID YOUR STUPID POLITICS. DICK.

Posted by chipples | October 14, 2006 3:18 AM

hahahahahahahahahahaha.
how does it feel to pay all that money to come out of it saying his show sucked?

you're an oxygen thief. Dick.

Posted by Dan | October 20, 2006 8:20 PM

I don't know about the others but my ticket was free, and I feel the same way... screw you Roger.

Posted by Theresa | October 27, 2006 12:52 AM

It's teh Dark Side of the moon tour coming to Colombia?? that's a great notice! i hope everything keeps stand and the show goes on!

Posted by Juan Caballero | November 15, 2006 2:56 PM

I find it funny that someone on here said that Pink Floyd has never done anything political before.. people who just listen to dark side i guess.. animals, the final cut, heck even the wall have references to polotical failures and america ('Hey you white house, haha charade you are'?)

And to the dude saying no-one said theyd 'never listen to his material again,' read through the comments properly before bagging him:
"I was so angry, I'll never listen to his material again, I was really was shocked. How would Roger like it if Godsmack when to London, and burned an effigy of the Queen on-stage and then burnt their flag. I'm sure he'd be really put off also."

happy?

I am somewhat dissappointed, cause im seeing him soon.. and dont want a concert filled with messages about bush etc (even though i'll more than likely agree with them) but putting bush/etc behind classic songs from final cut etc would just suck..

Posted by Sam | January 26, 2007 1:03 AM

Those of you who were so terrible offended by Roger's lyrics on his new stuff...well, I'm sorry but you're a bunch of idiots. Pink Floyd was always anti-establishment so the joke's on you if you never knew what the music was about until Roger had to spell it out for you on a gigantic screen. This is the same man who wrote virtually all of the lyrics for Pink Floyd's stuff and his message has changed very little.

So, I guess I'll apologize for Roger. I'm really sorry if you wanted to go to a concert and shout and scream and listen to music that doesn't mean anything. Ya know...Pink Floyd's music always meant something bust some of you just never got it. Is that Roger's fault?

Posted by Anonymous | February 26, 2007 12:31 AM

Roger is a man who can't even relate to his own mates he's known his entire life. You want to talk about a man who can't concede or forgive? This is Roger Waters. I still love the music, but I'll just view Roger as my music monkey going forward. I give a dollar, he plays me a song. Fair trade, then get lost.

Posted by Poor Roger | March 6, 2007 10:10 PM

I saw the dark side of the moon last year and it was the best show ever. I agree with rogers politics fully and think he has the right to say what ever he wants on stage.
ps poor roger u suck

Posted by pinky | March 18, 2007 10:07 PM

this is mike voheden i just want to say i saw the show too, "pinky" when roger waters showed the picture of osama binlaydon and sadum husin and that great texan, George W. Bush by god i was
pi$% offperiod

Posted by the vohedster | March 29, 2007 11:52 PM

"Vohedster" If you knew anything about little bush u would know that he is a warmonger just like "sadum" and "binlayden"(as you put it). He was also the only president to be almost assassinated by a pretzel, i mean come on man he obviously not a very intelligent person and niether is anyone who calls him "Great."

Posted by Pinky | March 30, 2007 12:04 AM

i went to the september 23rd show and i was tired when i left the concert and thats when you know it was good omp it was the most orgazmic thing put on stage

Posted by LaRue | April 2, 2007 11:56 AM

ANYONE ON THIS POST THAT DISRESPECTS ROGER WATERS IS A COMPLETE IDIOT. HAVE YOU EVER LISTENED TO ANY PINK FLOYD EVER? HE'S ALWAYS BEEN POLITICAL. HIS FATHER DIED IN WWII YOU IDIOTS. HE'S ALWAYS DESPISED WAR AND CLOSED-MINDEDNESS. AND YOU CAN'T GET ANY MORE CLOSE-MINDED THEN THE CHRISTIAN RIGHT. JESUS WOULD LOVE ROGER WATERS.

HOW YOU CAN BE SURPRISED BY HIS ANTI-BUSH SENTIMENTS? THIS IS NO BRITTANY SPEARS POP SHOW. IF YOU CAN'T HACK THE POLITICS, STAY HOME!!!! REAL FANS DON'T WANT YOU THERE ANYWAY.

FUCK GEORGE W. BUSH AND EVERY IDIOT WHO EVER VOTED FOR HIM!! BUSH=FASCISM!

"BRING THE BOYS BACK HOME" - THAT'S HOW YOU SUPPORT THE TROOPS. THAT'S PATRIOTISM!

Posted by Steve Dionne | April 6, 2007 10:12 PM

I saw the show at Manchester last night, what a great show. I've been reading the comments here and it saddens me that many of you still DON'T GET IT!!

Roger is not criticising America, just the current administration. He's not defending Osama or Al Qaeda, what he is defending is peace.

The right to a fair trial is a fundamental building block of the US Constitution or Bill of Rights, yet this is completely overlooked by you Right Wingers! This is not about the rights of terrorists, because UNTIL these people have recieved a FAIR TRIAL they are guilty of NOTHING!! THAT IS THE WHOLE POINT.

Roger has ALWAYS been political, he has ALWAYS been against war and violence and particularly those people who create war where there was none before. Terrorism is not WAR, it is not carried out by countries but by organisations, so to go to war with a country over the actions of an organisation is insanity.

How many people have to die before you feel fully avenged for 9/11??? Do you really think that these people who died on that date want MORE death??? Do you think their relatives want MORE death?? Or Do you think there might be a possibility that we could learn something from what happened, I'm 100% sure that the most fitting tribute to those who lost their lives on 9/11 would be that this incident created peace, not war.

As for Roger, he is right on the mark as far as I'm concerned, he wants you to open your mind and your heart and see that the majority of Muslims and Arabs are NOT bad or evil, they are just like you or I, they want peace too.

As for the person who says they HATE muslims, you must surely have thought the song ITF was to be taken literally, because thats outright RACISM, and THAT is part of the problem with this entire situation. ITF is a parody, it's about stupid people like YOU who feel that it is perfectly acceptable to discriminate against others based on their ethnicity. You should hang your head in shame.

Pink Floyd IS Roger Waters, he wrote 95% of ALL the lyrics, so if you like PF you like Roger.

On a side note the Whitehouse refered to on Animals is in fact Mary Whitehouse a British campaigner for censorship, not the White House in America.

Open your minds and your hearts, truly try and understand what it is Roger is trying to say and THEN pass judgement, don't jump to conclusions before you've even bothered to THINK about it, and god forbid anyone should do any research, because all the information is readily available, if you stop believing that everything you see in the media is the truth, particularly if it comes from an organisation that has a lot to gain by lying to you.

Mother should I trust the Government??? Absolutely NOT!!

Posted by Hey You | May 8, 2007 10:48 AM

Have a listen to RUSH's recent release "Snakes and Arrows"...Neil lays it out (on the religion-side of things).....

Best to all,

Doyle

Posted by Doyle Sheppard | May 16, 2007 7:07 PM

Its a larger than life 4 me when Ihad made it to concert,MUMBAI. I have been listening pink floyd since 1982.Right from IN THE FLESH to COMFORTABLY NUMB Roger rocked mumbai 07'Thank you Roger and DNA.

Posted by sonam lama | May 19, 2007 5:04 AM

What really matters is that the God, who created all people and all things loves Islamic terrorists, loves right wing Christians, and loves Democrats & Republicans equally. He loves Roger and He actually loves you and I. That doesn't mean for one second that any of us have it exactly right on our own. We are all sinners and we are only saved because of grace. God hates sin, not the person.

Posted by Brian | June 23, 2007 3:00 PM

What really matters is that the God, who created all people and all things loves Islamic terrorists, loves right wing Christians, and loves Democrats & Republicans equally. He loves Roger and He actually loves you and I. That doesn't mean for one second that any of us have it exactly right on our own. We are all sinners and we are only saved because of grace. God hates sin, not the person.

Posted by Brian | June 23, 2007 3:01 PM

I can't believe how many people on here were offended by the show. When I saw him a week ago at the Roger's Centre in Toronto I didn't here one boo from the crowd. I distinctly remember seeing the U.S. flag on the screen during "bring the boys back home". I think the majority of Americans have been brainwashed by their patriotism and truly believe Bush is a great leader and doing the right thing. I guess you have to live in Canada and watch the U.S. news to see how screwed up your country really is. I feel sorry for you people and hope that the next election will give you a decent leader that isn't a brain-dead loser. It's pretty bad you needed someone to translate the show for you, you close-minded, bible-thumping, war mongers!

...and who denies what the fightings' all about.

Posted by Matt Wynette | July 22, 2007 11:30 PM

Please tell Roger that the fact that he has a mike and an audience doesn't make him qualified to inject his own personal political views into his concerts. He is a muscician and should stick to making music, not political speeches.
Capitalism is the best system ever created for improving the standard of living for all people. He is so typical of hypocritical, elitist, liberals. It's okay for him to achieve wealth in a capitalist system and then he begrudges others the wealth that they have created? What other system would enabnle thousands of people to plunk down $50-$100 for tickets to his shows? Why is he for Obama? What has Obama ever done? I wish he would just shut up and sing. He is abusing the privelege he has been given. I will not spend one more penny on anything related to him.

Posted by gerry donnelly | April 30, 2008 11:13 AM

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