Posted in industry | music on January 8, 2008

Ticketexchange

Iif you buy tickets on ticketmaster, you can sell them back to someone else using Ticketexchange.

TicketExchange is Ticketmaster's new online service that enables premium and fan-to-fan transactions. Buyers simply select the ticket(s) they want based on price and seat location, without having to bid against other buyers, without having to coordinate delivery from anonymous sellers, and without the gamble that the tickets are legitimate. Sellers are guaranteed payment for tickets sold, without having to collect payment or deliver the tickets to the buyer.
Have you tried it?

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Comments (39)

This is not a new service...Ticketmaster still blows

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 2:56 PM

I hate Ticketmaster.

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:03 PM

I hate Ticketmaster.

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:03 PM

I still prefer furtive exchanges in alleyways.

Posted by drewo | January 8, 2008 3:03 PM

this could actually be a good idea and could avoid scalping, no?

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:04 PM

yes, makes perfect sense. You basically get to return your tickets on the condition that someone else wants them.

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:18 PM

just another way for ticketmaster to make ridiculous amounts of money off too-high fees.

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:25 PM

The circle is complete. Now not only do they get them to the scalpers, they buy them back from the scalpers to sell to the scalpers.

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:31 PM

wrong.. this is ticketmasters version of ebay. you can buy the tickets and sell them for higher if it sells out. and they dont care cause theyre making even more money from fees. they triple their service fees.. one from initial buyer, then another from when they sell, and yet another from the new buyer.

http://www.ticketmaster.com/h/te/about.html#Q3

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:32 PM

they could have just bought out stubhub, that is, unless they already own it???

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 3:47 PM

Ebay owns Stubhub.

Posted by edwyn the bear | January 8, 2008 3:56 PM

why don't they just allow refunds for resell (at original price)? this just encourages people to BE scalpers!

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 4:02 PM

Free enterprise. Ticket scalping is legal in NY now. Why would pay Ticketmaster's fees when they could just sell the tickets on Craigslist you may ask? Stupidity.

Posted by Ron | January 8, 2008 4:13 PM

I tried it. It's a joke.

(Sorry in advance for the long comment. I'm pretty pissed.)

I bought 4 tickets in May for Daft Punk at Red Rocks in July, thinking I'd have a chance to get out there. Unfortunately, work intervened and I could not go.

At that point, I had four tickets to a show I could not attend. I had paid Ticketmaster $44 in fees, on top of the actual ticket price (which was something along the lines of $42 a ticket).

In the old days, I'd just eat the tickets. But then I discovered TicketExchange. It had just been added to the site. I figured what the hell, I have nothing to lose.

I set up two offers of two tickets each. Both offers were accepted within days (it was about a week before the show). The tickets were resold (by Ticketmaster) at the original price -- the website does not allow you to alter the asking price to allow the seller to profit on the resale.

Ticketmaster then made me go through a bunch of hoops to get access to my bank account (so they could pay me the proceeds from the sale directly), and once that whole thing was verified I waited for my money (less $13 per ticket in ADDITIONAL fees for the resale service, mind you) to be deposited.

The proceeds were never deposited. Nor (and I realize this should be obvious) did I attend the show.

So, about two weeks after the show, I called Ticketmaster for the first of several times. It was only then I learned I needed to submit a form by mail to them, WITH THE ORIGINAL TICKETS ATTACHED, to get my money. Unless I submitted a form and the original tickets -- even though the show had taken place and a check of their records should indicate the original tickets were not used -- I would not be reimbursed for a minimum of 120 days.

Except when the sale was made, I threw the tickets away. The email response I received upon their resale seemed to indicate they were useless to me, so I chucked them.

As a (insert sarcasm here) very helpful phone rep pointed out later, the website makes it clear the policy requires me to send the tickets back to them in order to get my reimbursement. And she was right. It DOES say that. Along with a bunch of other fine print well AFTER it says the original tickets are invalidated (implying they are useless, and thus can be tossed). I did not read that far.

So, my penalty for using the TicketExchange service incorrectly:

-- $44 in fees for the original sale
-- $48 in fees for the TicketExchange resale
-- Still no reimbursement for the original sale(s)

It's just like the old days, except in the old days I didn't have to go to the aggravation of dealing with this horrible, horrible company -- twice.

Ticketmaster explained to me the policy is to prevent the tickets from being -- essentially, to protect THEIR ass from fraud. But isn't that why they invalidate the hard ticket in the first place?

It's been longer than 120 days, by the way (closer to 160 since the sale was made), and I still don't have my money.

Ticketmaster's business model is great. They took nearly $100 in fees from me and provided me nothing in return. And they collected revenue for my tickets twice!

Please, music lovers and readers of this awesome blog -- do NOT use TicketExchange. You'll wish you hadn't.

Posted by wjpurdy | January 8, 2008 4:37 PM

Fuck capitalism! Before capitalism fucks you!

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 4:39 PM

Wow. "...and without the gamble that the tickets are legitimate." Yup. Illegitimate tickets. That's what I want.

Fools.

Posted by Eggs1234 | January 8, 2008 4:58 PM

Ticketexchange is stupid. You have to bump your own ticket price up to more than face value so you can get back what you paid for. I had to sell Morrissey tickets that were originally $80 something and because of all the fees Ticketbastard adds, I had to sell them for over a $100. I wish Ticketmaster offered refunds (even though they do as a one-time gesture depending on the situation if you call them directly) I'd gladly take some kinda "Ticketmaster store credit" if I couldn't get a refund back to my credit card.

Posted by Renee | January 8, 2008 6:03 PM

what a bunch of fuckers. It's sort of like when the law uses some bullshit winning lottery tickets to draw fugitives in.
*Congratulation! You've won a chance to be fucked by us TWICE!!!*

Gotta be impressed and a little awed at the size of ticketmasters nuts.
The owner of that compnay probably has to put his balls in a wheelbarrow just to walk around. (thanks Bill Hicks for that mental picture)

Posted by wow | January 8, 2008 6:21 PM

@wjpurdy: You're one of those people that doesn't follow directions.

I hate ticketmaster, too. But read the rules for fuck's sake. Not that tough.

Posted by dude | January 8, 2008 6:46 PM

"wjpurdy: You're one of those people that doesn't follow directions."

My second grade teacher - is that you?!

Posted by scott | January 8, 2008 7:19 PM

Wjpurdy, just like everyone, didn't read the fine print. Like I'm assuming someone called the 'dude' wouldn't either.

If your meant to keep the tickets something like 'KEEP THE TICKETS' as opposed to 'the tickets are useless' might be helpful... unless of course ticketmaster does not want to refund the money... but they wouldn't want that would they...

Posted by DiscGoIsUm | January 8, 2008 7:59 PM

Hey, "dude," do you really have to be such a dick?

I freely admitted I did not read the TicketExchange instructions. Yet, from a company that is highly annoying but with which I do hundreds of dollars of business in a year, you'd think processes like TicketExchange would be highly enough evolved that I'd pretty much get away with not having to read instructions. You'd think they'd be willing to reach out to me as a loyal (and profitable) customer, admit their (new, possibly not quite market-ready) process might be unclear, and make an effort to convince me to remain a customer. Or, at the very least, live up to their end of the deal. But no such effort was made.

Ticketmaster took my tickets and resold them, but has not, to date, compensated me for the sale. All because of an administrative requirement that was not made explicitly clear prior to the transaction. In the quoted press release above, "Sellers are guaranteed payment for tickets sold, without having to collect payment or deliver the tickets to the buyer." Maybe other sellers. Certainly not this one.

I put myself in the position for this to happen, and I have learned from my mistake. Posting here is an effort to help people like you learn from my mistake: TicketExchange is (or was, back in July) a flawed service. Use it at your own risk.

PS: DiscGoIsUm... nice blog. I added it to my RSS aggregator.

Posted by wjpurdy | January 8, 2008 9:16 PM

wjpurdy, try telling ticketmaster that you never received the tickets, they must have gotten lost in the mail (assuming you did not buy them in person at a ticketmaster outlet).

Posted by don | January 8, 2008 10:39 PM

Good idea, don. Except by offering to sell your tickets through TicketExchange in the first place, you are implying they have been received by you.

TicketExchange treats the hard tickets (which they have a record of having sold and mailed to you) as virtual tickets as soon as you express your intent to sell them. They tell you the hard tickets are invalidated (meaning, they no longer have value, which in my case, I naturally assumed meant they could be thrown away) the instant they are sold.

I have spoken to Ticketmaster reps on four occasions. I have spoken to "managers" and "supervisors" the last three times I called. As hard line as they were on TicketExchange policy, I doubt they could be fooled into believing I never received the tickets in the first place. They're way too tough on their customers for that.

Maybe I should buy IACI. As a shareholder, I could really get behind this "steal from the customer and call it their mistake" for the huge, guilt-free profits that ensue.

Posted by wjpurdy | January 8, 2008 11:04 PM

So now it's Ticketmaster's fault that you're an idiot who didn't read the rules??? HAHAHAHAHA.

Posted by Anonymous | January 8, 2008 11:27 PM

wjpurdy, you probably already realize this but the reason they wanted the tickets back was to try to make sure you didn't sell the invalidated hard tickets to some unsuspecting person who would then get on ticketmaster's ass about allowing invalidated tickets to circulate after they realized they'd been scammed.

Posted by don | January 8, 2008 11:36 PM

@wjpurdy: You're right, maybe I didn't need to be such a dick. But your whole situation really exasperates me. One the one hand, you're too lazy to read instructions when there's a transaction where money is at stake. Your follow-up post indicates that you carry a sense of entitlement in that it's Ticketmaster's responsibility to _know_ that you're too lazy to read their rules and they should instead "reach out to you." For what?

But the part that irks me most about your predicament is the fact that you're willing to devote all this time to write up this long, eloquent argument about how you were "screwed by the man," if you will. Clearly you're smart enough to form sentences into a coherent (though flawed) argument. So why aren't you smart enough to know to read the rules and to follow them?

You fucked up. Is it so hard to take responsibility?

Posted by dude | January 9, 2008 1:58 AM

Well, "dude," I kinda did take responsibility in my original comment. That part where I wrote "And she was right. It DOES say that"? Yep, that pretty much implicates me.

It may be my fault for throwing away the tickets that were explicitly described to me as "invalidated," but at least some of the Ticketmaster skeeviness has got to bother you. I entered into an agreement with Ticketmaster to resell tickets I bought from them. They resold the tickets and pocketed a sizable fee for both transactions. They have, to this day, not reimbursed me for the tickets, effectively collecting revenue for those seats twice. Isn't that a bit of a harsh penalty for not reading the rules? I'm willing to suck it up, I guess, but the whole transaction (naturally) left a sour note in my mouth.

And, should I decide to never do business with Ticketmaster again, I wouldn't be able to attend the four or five Ticketmaster-exclusive shows I go to every year. That'd kinda suck.

If that's not more exasperating to you than my situation, then you are either a diehard capitalist or an unsympathetic (if articulate, refreshingly) asshole. Either way...

Posted by wjpurdy | January 9, 2008 7:32 AM

"TicketExchange is Ticketmaster's new online service that enables PREMIUM and fan-to-fan transactions."

Promoters/artist also use the exchange to sell off tickets. They're the true scalpers...hiding behind close doors.

When promoters/artist can't sell those PREMIUM tickets on the exchange it is than release back to the public onsale.

Die hard fans who goes for tickets during the initial public onsale will most likely get shit ass seats! While casual fans who buys tickets LAST MINUTE will most likely get the opportunity to get premium seats at face alue when those promoters/artist can't sell them on the exchange.

The ones that are getting screwed are the die hard hard fans!

Posted by Anonymous | January 9, 2008 10:30 AM

"TicketExchange is Ticketmaster's new online service that enables PREMIUM and fan-to-fan transactions."

Promoters/artist also use the exchange to sell off tickets. They're the true scalpers...hiding behind close doors.

When promoters/artist can't sell those PREMIUM tickets on the exchange it is than release back to the public onsale.

Die hard fans who goes for tickets during the initial public onsale will most likely get shit ass seats! While casual fans who buys tickets LAST MINUTE will most likely get the opportunity to get premium seats at face alue when those promoters/artist can't sell them on the exchange.

The ones that are getting screwed are the die hard hard fans!

Posted by Anonymous | January 9, 2008 10:30 AM

Yep, we all know TicketMaster or TicketExchange is not the way to go - so why not work with friends and fans of the bands to exchange tickets? I’m a user on www.freeticketexchange.com – it’s a way for fans and friends to connect. The site’s in Beta – I think it’s releaunching in a few weeks – but the best thing is you can buy tickets directly from our trusted network of fans and avoid The MAN."

Posted by Dave | January 9, 2008 11:41 AM

Yep, we all know TicketMaster or TicketExchange is not the way to go - so why not work with friends and fans of the bands to exchange tickets? I’m a user on www.freeticketexchange.com – it’s a way for fans and friends to connect. The site’s in Beta – I think it’s releaunching in a few weeks – but the best thing is you can buy tickets directly from our trusted network of fans and avoid The MAN."

Posted by Dave | January 9, 2008 11:44 AM

aww...isn't Dave the good lil intern?

Posted by Anonymous | January 9, 2008 3:44 PM

How much is brooklyn vegan getting paid for this post?

Posted by Anonymous | January 9, 2008 4:35 PM

I like Ticket Exchange better than Stub Hub myself. The prices usually seem to be a lot more fair whereas Stub Hub people charge way too much.

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