Posted in music on November 10, 2008

by Ryan Barkan

Gogol Bordello @ Irving Plaza (more by Jefferson)
Gogol Bordello

The second edition of this controversial new feature is back. "It's Not Selling Out Anymore" (or is it?)...

Pacific RiftAggressive racing game, Motorstorm, was one of the most successful titles for the Playstation 3 in 2007 (selling over three million copies world wide). It was only natural then, that Sony Computer Entertainment would get a sequel out in 2008. Enter Motorstorm: Pacific Rift. The game recently hit shelves in the US at end of October and in the UK this past week. The TV spot announcing the new game brilliantly matched Motorstorm's crazy, edgy style of racing on tracks in exotic locations with the "authentic energy" of Gogol Bordello's "Wonderlust King." Watch the video of the commercial below. Gogol Bordello tour dates are HERE.

While Gogol did not make the in-game soundrack, David Bowie, Clutch, Megadeth, The Hives, Simian Mobile Disco, Death From Above 1979, and more all made the cut. Eight of the forty-five songs are exclusive to the game including a remix by Diplo of Nirvana's "Swap Meet" *.

Thurston MooreSpeaking of exclusives, The Ramones' classic jam "Sheena Is A Punk Rocker" was covered by Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore and singer Jemina Pearl (from the now defunct Be Your Own Pet). Their version exclusively premiered in this past week's episode of Gossip Girl. Love & Rockets made the episode too...though not as an exclusive.

Other Notable Licensing News:

On the tube, One Tree Hill had songs by Ra Ra Riot and Margot & the Nuclear So-So's; 90210 had Florence & The Machine, The Raconteurs, and The Bravery; Grey's Anatomy had The Bird And The Bee, Whitest Boy Alive, and Brett Dennon.

M83's "You, Appearing" provides a solemn background to a French commercial for Douleurs' "Pain Without Borders" commercial. Watch the video below. M83 is currently on a tour of the US (and in NYC this week).

Cadbury's new "Favourites" commercial features the song "Stars and Sons" by Canadian supergroup Broken Social Scene. Watch the video below. Pics from the band's recent show at the Brooklyn Masonic Temple can be seen HERE.

Bad Brains

Supreme continues its love for musical collaborations with the announcement of a Bad Brains x Supreme collection. The line consists of a couple hoodies, a t-shirt, and two different styles of Vans shoes. Bad Brains have been busy lately playing shows in Austin, NYC and elsewhere.

Iron MaidenVans recently released its fourth Iron Maiden tribute shoe, this time featuring the artwork from the Powerslave album. The Sk8-Hi and slip on models are available at the vans online store as well as local distributors.

Videos below...

Motorstorm: Pacific Rift Commercial with Gogol Bordello:

Douleurs Sans Frontières 2008 with M83

Cadbury Favourites w/ Broken Social Scene

---

* full disclosure: we'll use this asterisk week after week to note if the company Ryan works with during the day represents any of the artists mentioned in the post. Nirvana is one of them.

PREVIOUSLY: Last week's post

---

      

Comments (48)

while a bit informative, the point of these posts is obviously to create a long "bands we'll shit on for selling out to the man" thread. not liking this feature at all.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 5:46 PM

Can this.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 5:53 PM

"the point of these posts is obviously to create a long bands we'll shit on for selling out."

I was not aware of that.

Posted by brooklynvegan | November 10, 2008 5:53 PM

Why is this controversial? I'm confused on what the big deal here is. I'm reading news about artists I like. And this is so horrible because???

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 5:57 PM

"I was not aware of that."

you will be once you watch how the thread develops.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:01 PM

People can come to their own conclusions. Obviously nobody is going to mind if Bad Brains puts out a new line of sweatshirts or M83 lends one of their songs to what looks to be a charity, but some may find it slightly revolting that their favorite Broken Social Scene song is now being used in a Cadbury commercial.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:05 PM

I think these posts encourage healthy discussion about an aspect of the industry people are still conflicted about. Keep it up.

... Cadbury's?

Jesus.

Posted by Nesstah | November 10, 2008 6:12 PM

those Maiden shoes are dope

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:13 PM

Forgot about Gears of War 2 using Devotchka's very haunting "How It Ends".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iam4EKIpY5A

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:13 PM

I think selling out is writing about bands that pay to advertise on your site...

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:15 PM

I wonder if Thurston is drinking a complimentary latte from his sponsor Starbucks while hearing his cover song on Gossip Girl.

Joey.Spinning.Grave.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:27 PM

"I think selling out is writing about bands that pay to advertise on your site..."

I assume you meant writing about bands "because" they pay to advertise on your site.

And assuming you were making an accusation, it is unfounded and shitty. If not, then ok - didn't mean to get defensive.

Posted by brooklynvegan | November 10, 2008 6:32 PM

Hey, ease up on BV. What's a little log-rolling and back-scratching among music industry insiders. BV is a STAR, just like Perez Hilton!

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:37 PM

WHO.
FUCKING.
CARES.

If you don't like it, don't read it. Jesus... seriously guys?

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:40 PM

Also, hating on BV? It's free and not compulsory for you to read.
Start your own goddamned music blog, jerk!

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:44 PM

Isn't there a chance that features like this could start to signal the end of BV as a site for almost purely objective music news? It's a great resource for bulk press releases, tour dates and ticket sales, and a growing library of photos, but cluttering the site with features could make it difficult to discover the most newsworthy posts already pushed to the bottom and beyond the first page. Something separating the news from the features would make a post like this less problematic.

I'm not suggesting this to sound like a jerk. I love this site, but it'd be awful to see it loaded with features that move to block basic news.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:48 PM

When Sonic Youth decided to let Starbucks sell their CDs I honestly didn't care that much. But working with Jemina Pearl? Now I'm put off.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 6:54 PM

Woa! This is post-post modern. The ads are the features and the features are the ads!

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 7:00 PM

only Thurston worked with Jemina. he's an old man and a sucker for anything Ramones.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 7:00 PM

i think bv should stick to copying and pasting press releases and not try to get creative

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 7:39 PM

i like this feature. but think we're beyond bands having anything to "sell out" in the first place.

Posted by matt | November 10, 2008 7:39 PM

You guys have it all wrong, Cadbury is the one who sold out.
BSS for a commercial, how cliche. I thought you were better than that Cadbury.

Next time let your chocolate do the talking, and leave stupid canadian indie rock to M&Ms

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 8:01 PM

i heard a dan deacon song during a crayola commercial today & after a little googling found out crayola also used an animal collective song in a commercial a little while back as well.

Posted by joey jo-jo junior. | November 10, 2008 8:20 PM

how about Cat Power again??great cover of Space Odditity though

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 8:26 PM

a sanitary pad commercial wanted to use Nick Cave's "Red Right Hand" once. if i were him I would have totallllly sold out to them.

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 8:45 PM

I am pretty sure he can (and does) run his site any way he wants and feature whatever content he wants. Don't like a feature? Don't read it. What a difficult concept, huh?

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 9:33 PM

people who are into supreme are insufferable

Posted by Anonymous | November 10, 2008 10:32 PM

i don't mind selling out that much, but the yahoo ads i all the cabs with "start wearing purple" make me wanna punch eugene hutz's agent in the balls

Posted by aukenbals | November 10, 2008 11:02 PM

I came in here to mention the Yahoo ads in cabs. Shit makes me angry. If I was a Gogol fan, I would REALLY be pissed.

Posted by feedbacker | November 10, 2008 11:08 PM

can someone edit this crap? thnx

Posted by wtf | November 11, 2008 12:38 AM

"It's not selling out anymore" LMAO

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 8:51 AM

supreme is the worst. skateboarding is not a fashion.

wanna hear that thurston/jemina cover. BYOP wasn't terrible, just a little bratty...youtube video has been removed due to a copyright claim....

i guess i'll just use my internet scouring skills.

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 8:57 AM

Blech.

Posted by SeeYouInTea | November 11, 2008 11:16 AM

I think this feature is absolutely fascinating. Please do not listen to other comments and cancel this feature!! For those who think this is selling out - please. These artists created this music independently. Long after its creation, the artists are seeking to try and recoup extra profits from their music. In many cases, these artists are not creating music specifically for its commercial value. They are recouping additional value from companies, who obviously sell their items to consumers who are fans of this music in the first place. Further, how else do you expect a lot of these artists to continue making enough money to continue producing music that you enjoy if they are not compensated enough to continue in the music business? More than any others, this feature exposes how music and the larger consumer culture we live in are becoming more integrated. The death of the album and the recording business as we knew it preceded this. This is the consequence. I think most of the fans on this site would rather think of their favorite artists as living and creating in some sort of artistic utopia devoid of material considerations and not consider the larger issue of the music business as it exists today. Thank you Ryan for this fascinating new feature on BV.

Posted by Scott P | November 11, 2008 11:20 AM

I really don't understand all the mental gymnastics being performed to say that licensing your art to sell a product is not selling out. Obviously it is an individual choice whether to sell out, but defending that choice seems weird. It is what it is.

Posted by SeeYouInTea | November 11, 2008 11:29 AM

I dislike this feature. Seems to be very little "content" and instead is just more ads except instead of at the top of page or in sidebars it is given same typeface and positioning as the tour announcements, live photos, etc.

Sites need ads to stay alive, but this just rubs me the wrong way
Easy to skip over though, don't plan to ever click this feature again and that doesn't bother me.

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 11:51 AM

the increased amount of licensing and promotional money being thrown at indie rockers is burning out bands faster. An average indie band success story now lasts about an album and a half or two years, tops.

This is partially due to the pressures from all the ad money being funneled to successful indie rockers. Promotional and licensing money has the effect of turning bands into caricatures, ie, here comes Dan Deacon doing his Dan Deacon thing for Converse or Nike or whatever. Of course he's going to be as standard-issue Dan Deacon, the nightclub act version, as he can be. That's what they're buying.

Promotional money has the effect of pushing bands to become static, two-dimensional acts because to change and evolve artistically would threaten their value in that market. The same thing can happen when bands get successful in the traditional sense also, but it's a helluva a lot more pronounced when the "success" is about advertisers thinking you're the right voice for their marketing campaigns. Ad people obviously aren't the savviest, most open-minded music consumers out there. Like all non-artistic business, ad people as abhorrent to risk. Taking risky artistic chances is not encouraged.

Indie music has thrived and has managed to unseat the major label system because it was willing to take artistic risks and break from the monotony of most popular music. The glut of licensing and promotional money is threatening that spirit.

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 11:56 AM

"i guess i'll just use my internet scouring skills."

Or you can click on the link provided in the post.

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 12:09 PM

I've written a few of the posts here critical of licensing, but I want to come out and say that I'm personally really psyched that this weekly feature now exists.

it draws attention to the licensing and product promotion game, which is something most casual music fans don't really grasp yet.

That game is so tacky and creatively corrosive, I honestly don't think it will withstand the scrutiny. So bring on the scrutiny!

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 1:02 PM

that cadbury ad is about a straight up an example you could find of advertisers using a song to co-opt not just the band, but the underground community it represents.

the ad's message is simple: play some broken social scene, eat some cadbury chocolates, and sexy indie rocker picnic erupts from the ground. The message: cadbury is part of the fabric of your indie rocker scene.

this is tacky because broken social scene is in effect not just selling their song, they're enabling the selling out of the scene as a whole.

This matters because indie subculture is one of the few grassroots cultures left for middle class people in the Western world. Everything else is commodified from getgo; movies, tv, radio all come down from big media to us. Indie culture arguably produces the only fashion, music, and trends that come from the bottom up, from people hanging out with each other and bouncing ideas off each other. That is a precious thing, and it isn't broken social scene's to sell.

[ btw, this is obviously a Canadian ad. Cadbury is to Canada what Hershey's chocolate is to the States ]

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 1:20 PM

great new feature, keep it up!

hopefully this will help foster a civilized debate on the nature and merits of music licensing and how it both hurts and helps artists.

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 5:59 PM

"hopefully this will help foster a civilized debate on the nature and merits of music licensing and how it both hurts and helps artists."

which will likely devolve into the same boring debate every single week.

Posted by Anonymous | November 11, 2008 6:08 PM

I don't think BV should have comments :)

Posted by Eric L | November 11, 2008 10:28 PM

You can hear Jim Noir "My Patch" on "little big planet" ... I love that game.

Posted by Anonymous | November 12, 2008 1:51 PM

Above posts have brilliant stuff. do same job in future as well.

Posted by Bedroon Furniture | May 14, 2009 7:05 AM

If you don't like it, don't read it. Jesus... seriously guys?

Posted by louis vuitton | September 9, 2009 11:47 AM

thanks for sharing

Posted by gagner argent | October 2, 2009 8:41 PM

The OST to Motorstorm game is cool. I've downloaded it already and am listening to it right now.

Posted by Andrea C. Taylor | December 15, 2010 4:40 AM

Leave a Comment