Posted in music | pictures on December 5, 2011

words by Christopher Paragraph, photos by Dana (distortion) Yavin

DOWNLOAD: Bird of Youth - Bombs Away, She Is Here to Stay (MP3)

Sondre Lerche looking sexy as usual @ MHOW Friday night
Sondre Lerche

The Friday night show at Music Hall of Williamsburg featured three very different songwriters who all happen to live within a few blocks of the venue. The same is true for me so, in terms of proximity, the night was a success before it even began.

Bird Of Youth opened with a couple songs from their self-released album "Defender," breezing through them with ease and on-stage confidence that one would usually expect from a more seasoned band. This helped to counteract the darker themes of the songs, perhaps the best example of which was a song that lead singer Beth Wawerna wrote for her father. The unforgettable closing lines, "you watched me as I watched you watch me cry," caught more than a few off-guard. The songs are unique in terms of Wawerna's vocal phrasing. Rather than writing melodies over single chords, the melodies seem to form themselves over the chord changes. It feels like she allows the phrases to emerge from the song, instead of constructing a song around a pre-conceived melody. As a songwriter, Wawerna is doing something special and distinct. Unlike many female-fronted bands of their ilk, the songs don't hide behind her voice; her voice seems to be dragged along by the force of each song. This may present a problem for a pop singer, but for a band like Bird Of Youth, it proves to be a perfect way to articulate emotional, expressive songs. The last song of their short set took a different turn, however, and was significantly more poppy and conventionally structured. Working in a Nada Surf-esque style, the song succeeds in a way that runs counter the aforementioned thoughts in this review. An interesting way to end the set, leaving the audience pleased but just unsure enough to want to hear more.

Next was Will Sheff, frontman for the successful Okkervil River, a solo set sandwiched between two bands. It was informative and interesting to see Sheff perform solo. Over the years, Okkervil River has come to be known for their energetic, literate folk pop anthems. But most hear them as simply "a rock band." Sheff's folk influences shined through in this set, making the DNA of Okkervil River more apparent. Hearing these songs strummed and picked on an acoustic guitar made clear the influences of British folk songwriters like Roy Harper and Bill Fay. For audience members not interested in the musical roots behind Okkervil River (which many Sondre Lerche fans probably are not) Sheff provided an honest and emphatic set of complex, lyric-driven songs. It was clear form the entranced crowd that Sheff won over a bunch of new fans. Or at least hooked their curiosity. Sheff's lyrics beg the listener to re-listen. As opposed to the chordally-led phrasing of Beth Wawerna, Sheff's songs are driven by lyrics and melodies that command the chords. It was interesting to see songwriting approached from such different angles back-to-back. It is worth noting at this point that there were many people in the far back of the room who seemed intent on talking louder than the music. One can only assume they were attending to "see" Sondre Lerche and felt completely justified in talking over any other artist performing. Sheff took a moment to point out these people (which of course went right over their heads). This resulted in supportive applause from the majority, who were clearly distracted and annoyed by the loud group in the back.

SIDE NOTE: this raises a question, or at least an interesting debate: Is it "OK" to talk loudly at a concert? If someone pays $15 to see a show, isn't it reasonable to expect them to listen to the songs? And even if they aren't interested in a certain artist, isn't it reasonable to expect the respect and courtesy of keeping one's voice quiet, both in regards to the artists themselves and the fans who might actually be trying to listen? In the event that this occurs, should the artist take the initiative to shush them, or should a fellow audience member? Both? Neither? Discuss.

Back to the show. When Sondre Lerche took the stage, a young cavalcade of girls had pushed their way to the front. As he stepped to the mic the screams were shrill and unexpectedly loud. Lerche introduced himself with a solo number before bringing out the band. Although the synth player and bassist had apparently just joined the band a couple weeks earlier, they played tight and confidently, each member brimming with excitement about the songs, not just following charts. The drummer's incredible precision almost stole the show - he brought the energy of the songs out in ways drummers rarely can, and was single-handedly responsible for many "jaw-drop" moments. The only real way to describe it is that it's fueled by real passion for the songs. It's that special intangible thing you can't fake, and this guy clearly has it. Lerche fired off short gems from throughout his career, never letting go of the stranglehold he had on the crowd from the moment he stepped out. On one level his songs are complex, melding jazz chords with pop melodies a la Steely Dan. On another, he's able to perform simple, quiet ballads, which he did at one point, stepping away and unplugging, treating the silent room to an acoustic rendition of "Dear Laughing Doubters."

Sondre Lerche

There were a handful of particularly special moments, including a performance of "When The River," a song about homesickness featuring a choir of the "people he misses most when he's away." This group included his wife, local songwriter JBM, and actor Christopher Abbott. Will Sheff and Beth Wawerna also joined Sondre on stage to trade verses on a cover of Steely Dan's "Dirty Work."

By the time the show was over, it truly felt like Lerche had turned the room into his own house full of friends. He stood atop a monitor wedge and performed the final encore, harmonizing to the 600+ people taking the lead vocal on "Modern Nature." Lerche has toured for years as a solo artist but seeing him with a band showed that he's not just a one-man show. His music is big and the full-band show proved him to be a full fledged rock n roll guy.

More pictures from the show, setlists included, and a video of Sondre and band on Letterman (from 11/22), below...

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Sondre Lerche - Private Caller - David Letterman 11-22-11


Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Birds of Youth

Will Sheff

Will Sheff

Will Sheff

Will Sheff

Will Sheff

Will Sheff

Will Sheff

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

Sondre Lerche

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Comments (15)

This show was incredible. I've long been an Okkervil River fan but seeing Will Sheff solo was refreshing (still prefer the entire band though).

Sondre Lerche truly came into his own here. He had the crowd from the first song and the support just got stronger. He's turned into an act i'll make it a point to never miss.

As for the people talking, it's incredibly rude. I get that you might not care about an opening act but other people do. All of the Bowery venues have bar areas where you can go, talk, and wait for your band to come on. Talking during a concert is akin to talking during a movie.

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 12:19 PM

Dude this was awesome! I had so much fun. Thanks for the pictures.

Posted by Britax | December 5, 2011 12:21 PM

KCMU > KEXP

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 12:28 PM

"It was informative and interesting to see Sheff perform solo."

Thanks, Reviewbot©!

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 12:41 PM

people can talk as much as they want, and will. no expectations for courtesy. if i want to talk and you don't like it, grow up, and ask me to be quiet. so yes, it's okay, it cant be stopped

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 1:53 PM

^^Self absorbed scumbag.

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 2:01 PM

people talk , it happens but loud talkers have something wrong with them..

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 2:22 PM

1:53, and if somebody asks you to be quiet, will you?

I was at a show once, I think American Analog Set at the Knitting Factory, and this couple behind me wouldn't stop talking. I told them I was trying to listen to the band, and that if they were just going to talk, they could go to the back of the room. The guy said "if I'm talking so loud, tell me what I was saying" I didn't know, and he felt he had proved me wrong. I don't know if they left after that, but they did quiet down.

Another time a girl got mad at me because I clapped after a song was over. Anytime you cram a lot of people into a little space, people are gonna get annoyed at each other.

Posted by Portable Pally | December 5, 2011 2:24 PM

i would make an effort to be quieter, yes

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 2:34 PM

No, it's not OK to talk at length at a show while there is a performance. A spare comment now and again is fine--you're there to have fun and part of that is communicating with your friends. But it is rude to those around you and disrespectful of the performers to have extended conversations. If you don't want to listen, fine, go elsewhere, but you absolutely do not have the right to ruin the performance for others.

Posted by Dear Abby | December 5, 2011 3:18 PM

YAY LOCAL NATIVES

Posted by G | December 5, 2011 3:54 PM

Fuck people that talk OVER a band that is performing live. It's one thing to say something in your friend's ear at a normal volume, but if you feel the need to amplify the sound of your voice ABOVE that of the music, then stay the fuck home or go to a bar where that sort of thing is appropriate.

Posted by Anonymous | December 5, 2011 5:45 PM

It depends on the concert. I will yell my ass off at the front row during a show at a serious loud rocking and rolling band, but will use my quiet voice for the hummus based shows.

Posted by Anonymous | December 6, 2011 12:03 AM

People talking during Will Sheff was ridiculous, and I was only there to see him. If you would rather talk than watch the band, go in the back room or to the downstairs bar. ESPECIALLY during an acoustic set. Goddamn.

Posted by Anonymous | December 6, 2011 11:03 AM

really amazing

Posted by jordon | August 10, 2013 7:53 PM

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