Posted in music | venues on April 17, 2012

Lakeside Lounge

NYMD reports:

"Lakeside Lounge has been sold and will be closing at the end of April. After just over fifteen years in business, the bar that defined oldschool East Village cool will be replaced by a gentrifier whiskey joint, no doubt with $19 artisanal cocktails and hedge fund nebbishes trying to pick up on sorostitutes when their boyfriends are puking in the bathroom - or out of it."
EV Grieve points out that this news comes just eight months after the closing of East Village bar Banjo Jim's. (which reminds me, what's up with Kate's Joint?)

Meanwhile, stop by Lakeside Lounge, not to be confused with Parkside one more time. Check out their final two-week schedule below...

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Lakeside Lounge

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Comments (72)

That place defined old school East Village cool?

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:17 AM

How a place that opened in 1997 "defined old school East Village cool" is beyond me.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:24 AM

did anyone else hear that it got flooded? is that why it's closing?

Posted by canada | April 17, 2012 11:24 AM

wow this blows. the neighborhood is going to the sh*tter. we keep losing these really authentic places that get replaced with plastic yuppie crap.
when are they going to start creating some sort of protection for small business owners? hopefully before the neighborhood turns into one giant slurpee!!!

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:25 AM

Yeah the East Village sure has been gentrified since 1997.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:25 AM

i hope they replace it with a cupcake shop

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:25 AM

They had the best photobooth.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:25 AM

15 years means this place opened around 1997? How is that old school? The East Village already sucked by that point.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:26 AM

"wow this blows. the neighborhood is going to the sh*tter. we keep losing these really authentic places that get replaced with plastic yuppie crap."

Authentic is a funny word. It was a cookie cutter EV bar that opened at the tail end of the EV being relevant.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:28 AM

let's talk about those two buff dudes in the window

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:30 AM

IT'LL COME BACK AS A HOLOGRAM

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:36 AM

I hear it was flooded. Let's just meet up at Hi-fi.

Posted by tenni | April 17, 2012 11:41 AM

I for one am a believer in the philosophy, "Out with the old, in with the new!" Hopefully the new establishment serves robust hummus platters to accompany the $19 artisanal cocktails.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:48 AM

I hope they find another home for the photobooth - best one in nyc...

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:52 AM

whatever. At least B Side is still alive and going strong.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 11:52 AM

Hopefully another Quizno's

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:01 PM

has anyone else noticed that the east village is turning into murray hill? 2nd ave and 10th street on a saturday night may as well be 2nd and 33rd.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:02 PM

Murray Hill is a good comparison. Then again, Murray Hill turned into the UWS, first. It's becoming one homogenized island.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:05 PM

"...will be replaced by a gentrifier whiskey joint, no doubt with $19 artisanal cocktails and hedge fund nebbishes trying to pick up on sorostitutes when their boyfriends are puking in the bathroom - or out of it."

Something tells me that whoever worte this IS one of those hedge-fund nebbishes trying to pretend for a brief moment that he isn't.

Also, "gentrifier"? Is that even a word (or even used correctly for that matter?)?


And I think 11:48 is being serious too.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:12 PM

Ave B still has Mona's, B-Side, Boxcar, and Manitoba's, if you're in need of a good douche-free dive bar. I totally agree that 2nd ave has ventured into murray hill territory, but the "alphabet city" region of the EV is still going relatively strong

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:13 PM

I don't really care about a bar here or there, what I miss is the sheer seediness of the people and the neighborhood. Freaky shit used to happen all the time.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:24 PM

SO MANY VIPS!!!

Posted by VIP | April 17, 2012 12:37 PM

I am proud/ashamed to be one of the few Omar's to use the Omar the Fortune Teller machine

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:48 PM

1997?

ha ha ha ha

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 12:57 PM

@1213

Ave. A has been pretty lame for a while now.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 1:01 PM

Hopefully Sabra takes advantage of the real estate opportunity and finally opens that free standing store.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 1:22 PM

I knew this place was done when nobody showed up for last year's official Mia Mind Music CMJ Afterparty. Good riddance, you cocksuckers!

Posted by Stevie B | April 17, 2012 1:30 PM

East Village died in 2011

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 1:33 PM

hopefully a sbarro's! best pizza in NYC!

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 1:35 PM

The only bar that matters in the EV is Heathers. Not "old school", but it's the most consistently quality, non-douche bar. And that they have DJs who actually play good music is a HUGE plus.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 1:46 PM

The dream of the 90's is alive in Sophies.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 2:03 PM

Lakeside is not closing because someone else is taking over. They are closing because they can't get ahead. If all of the boo-hooers went out and supported local bars at least as much as they complain and blog, the place would still be open. Bar owners have to pay bills just like everyone else. They can't keep a place open based on the once a year visit that y'all make. If you really care so much about these places, start frequenting them again. The others will surely follow if they don't start making profits.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 2:47 PM

"15 years means this place opened around 1997? How is that old school? The East Village already sucked by that point."

That area of the EV was still good in 1997. It was probably around the peak (first term Giuliani) then.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 3:12 PM

wrong, 312, guiliani killed it by 1995 at the latest

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 3:25 PM

Giuliani forced all of the colorful and dirty losers to relocate to Brooklyn?

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 3:36 PM

Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani Giuliani

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 3:48 PM

not getting ahead and someone else taking over is the same thing moron.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 3:50 PM

247 wrong!

It's not that simple. Even if this and similar joints were very busy they would still be forced to close.

The problem is the landlords. They get really greedy once a neighborhood gentrifies. They hike up the rent to more than a dive bar could possibly pay even if they were doing amazing business. The reason for this is that the chain stores i.e banks, Starbucks, Subway, Dunkin Donuts, etc. can afford to pay these gigantic sums of money for rent. That is the problem. The landlords force the small businesses out and try to lure in the chains to make more money.

That is why there will be 125 Seven Elevens in Manhattan in 5 years.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 3:54 PM

^I'm so sure dude

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:00 PM

"wrong, 312, guiliani killed it by 1995 at the latest"

Giuliani took office in 1994.

1st Ave might have been gentrified slightly (by today's standards) by 1997, but Ave B was still mostly untouched. By the time Giuliani's second term started in 1998, most of unique places started closing name.

Sad to see NYC become what it is today. Even sadder is that rents are at an all-time high. High rents to live somewhere that is a shadow of its former self?

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:05 PM

It's gentry, or landed gentry, not gentrifiers.

Posted by Regular reader | April 17, 2012 4:05 PM

"The problem is the landlords. They get really greedy once a neighborhood gentrifies"

I hate to be the one to break this to you, but the neighborhood has been gentrified for ages. It was gentrified by filthy heroin addicts, but someone had to drive out all the old Ukrainian ladies.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:06 PM

3:50, it's not the same thing. And I'm speaking from inside knowledge, not from interweb knee-jerk cliched commentary. The Lakeside owners opted not to renew their lease. Because they were not making money as the neighborhood clientele stopped coming out. The landlord didn't raise the rent. In fact, that particular landlord is a very generous and honorable fellow. They just failed to be making the revenue to make ends meet. In fact, it still hasn't been decided what is going into that space (nice fact checking in the blogosphere, the place is still up for grabs). I love how much people speculate on reasons for closings and that it's always gentrification. I was born and raised in NYC. And I hate spoiled yuppie brats more than any of you since I depend upon them to make a living. But sometimes, sometimes, a place no longer works just because the clientele stopped coming out because they all got married, had babies, moved to the 'burbs themselve, went to rehab, or are just in a different chapter of life. Which is all fine, of course...we can't all remain 20-something booze hounds forever. But when it comes to bars, they rely on REGULAR patronage. Simple fact. IT'S CLOSING BECAUSE YOU ALL STOPPED COMING OUT! TAKE IT FROM A BARTENDER WHO WORKED NIGHTS IN THAT PLACE WHERE THE RING WAS ONLY $78. If you care so much about local bars, let's see you all flood the Lakeside bartenders with business and tips over the next two weeks for the many years of devotion that they put into that place! And let's see you give Manitobas, Mona's, Ottos, and all of the other great bars on Avenue B who are struggling some attention again. Or just wait until the next one closes and cry about how unfair it is. You have no one but yourselves to blame. If you live in NYC, appreciate it. And do it more than once a year on your birthday. The only places that will survive are tourist attractions.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:24 PM

^ Nah. It's a natural state for a neighborhood to be overwhelming composed of counter-culture establishments and people. To suggest that the East Village was taken over by such people at the expense of previous inhabitants is just a lie. A lie, I tell ya. A Lie!!!!!


The Man won't let us have anything of our own. :-(

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:25 PM

Oops. 4:25 was for 4:06.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:28 PM

4:25, well put! It's nothing new!

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:38 PM

who cares? There are approximately 3 million other places in the city to get watered down rail drinks. At 99% of them don't have shitty live bands annoying you.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:39 PM

Hahahahahahaha!

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:42 PM

The Lakeside had great bands, not shitty ones, fool. Don't forget Spanking Charlene will be playing the lakeside lounge this saturday at 11pm

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 4:49 PM

^pass. I'm sure I can find a soda & whiskey elsewhere.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 5:21 PM

'The only places that will survive are tourist attractions.'

There's a reason for this. Nobody cool actually lives around this area anymore. they've all been priced/forced out, so the only people around are tourists and bridge and tunnel idiots and the new crop of completely uncool residents.

It's not that the old regulars in the neighborhood stopped coming to the neighborhood dive, it's that those regulars aren't living in the nabe anymore. IF you price out all the customers of the establishment it stand to reason that the establishment goes next.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 5:30 PM

^or the establishment could try something totally crazy like adapting.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 5:36 PM

"Nobody cool actually lives around this area anymore"

Hahaha. I used to hang out in the EV all the time back in the day, and the people were decidedly NOT cool. More like social misfits. I've always had a soft spot for em', as evidenced by my similar taste in music, but don't be delusional like hipsters are.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 5:41 PM

By cool I meant social misfits. That's what made the area cool.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 5:54 PM

sure by 1997 the EV was already a shadow of what it once was in the 70's/80's and early 90's, but compare 1997 to today and it might as well have been part of the heyday.

Hell, as lame as NYC was in 97, there weren't anywhere near as many bank atm branches douchbags and chainstores around as there are today.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 5:58 PM

Benny got a new tattoo
Down at the St. Mark's Zoo

He walked down to the park
Drinkin 40's, till it's dark
Talkin to a grey haired man
In a tie-dyed shirt and ragged pants
He said,
That's where the hippies used to play
Down on Avenue A

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 6:01 PM

NYC sucks now

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 6:03 PM

I just hope Mamouns doesn't close.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 6:23 PM

"sure by 1997 the EV was already a shadow of what it once was in the 70's/80's and early 90's, but compare 1997 to today and it might as well have been part of the heyday.
Hell, as lame as NYC was in 97, there weren't anywhere near as many bank atm branches douchbags and chainstores around as there are today."

I consider first term Giuliani as the most recent heyday. I was born and raised here, and the '70s and '80s were no fun. I still remember the crunch of crack vials as you stepped on them since they were everywhere. In the '90s, city was cleaned up a bit, rents were still cheap, neighborhoods actually existed (newbies will never experience this) and fun was to be had. Loft parties were still everywhere, even with all the mega clubs.

Posted by Anonymous | April 17, 2012 8:10 PM

Good riddance. This place never had a hardcore punk or metal show.

Fuck Mona's. 'Place has sucked since 92-93 and was going downhill starting '90. Avenue B for Blows.

Alphabet City is going strong? Really? There isn't a single live music venue, record store, or maybe even book store on Avenue A, B, C, or D, or on the streets between them. The only live music venues in the so-called "East Village" are on the outer-edges of it: Otto's Shrunken Head on 14th Street, Bowery Electric at Bowery and 2nd Street, Mercury Lounge at East Houston off Essex Street, National Underground and The Local 269 further east on the south side of East Houston. These venues are shit compared to CBGB, Continental, and Coney Island High.

Posted by D | April 17, 2012 11:43 PM

^ Plenty of good record shops in alphabet city.
The area is still one of the best areas in manhattan in my opinion. I mean, avenue D is still irrelevant though.

Posted by Anonymous | April 18, 2012 12:29 AM

Ok name them 12:29pm.

Norman's Sound And Vision doesn't count cuz it's on Third Avenue. Neither do any of the remaining record stores on St.Mark's Place, Gimme Gimme, or Rainbow if it's still around.

Alphabet City: On or east of Avenue A between Houston and 14th Street.

Posted by D | April 18, 2012 12:52 AM

4:24, I hear ya. But I think the clientele stopped coming out because the old crowd moved away, got jobs, married/kids, died off, etc. The new crowd who would be there are now in North Brooklyn. The East Village has been replaced by condos, Starbucks, and banks.

Posted by Anonymous | April 18, 2012 8:58 AM

Oops, 4:24. I said the same exact thing at 8:58 that you did. My bad.

Posted by Anonymous | April 18, 2012 9:04 AM

Man, I miss the old days. I was in some bland sports-ish bar in the East Village a few years back, and while there I realized I was in the old Z Bar. I miss that place. I also miss browsing through used/promo CDs at Sounds on St. Marks. I barely recognize the East Village now.

Posted by Anonymous | April 18, 2012 9:09 AM

it's the douchification of the east village

Posted by Anonymous | April 18, 2012 6:07 PM

Douchebag City!

Posted by Anonymous | April 18, 2012 6:11 PM

Wow, I guess anyone who has lived or visited regularly here anytime from 1997 on has the false sense of entitlement that they are the cool ones that are the "real New York East Villagers". Get back to me once you all wake up and get a life.

Posted by Anonymous | April 19, 2012 10:57 AM

^True. Many of these commenters obviously don't even live in NYC ,let alone the EV. Neighborhoods in NYC are in constant flux. The artsy, rock & roll demographic that used to live in the EV and patronize the local bars all moved to Astoria, Kensington, Cobble Hill, and Greenpoint 6 years ago. There is a scene in those areas. And I bet 6 years from now, the current EV contingent will all move to Sunnyside and be replaced by Australians. The same way that Carroll Gardens Brooklyn is now a French colony. It happens. But when certain bars and businesses no longer flourish because of the change in demographics, it shouldn't be such a big surprise. Are we really that surprised that a rock & roll bar no longer works when the rock & rollers leave town?

Posted by Anonymous | April 19, 2012 1:19 PM

there was death in that bathroom. im glad it closed.

Posted by anna | July 8, 2012 6:54 PM

I agree

Posted by jordon | August 3, 2013 2:22 PM

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