Posted in music | pictures | tour dates on January 23, 2014

photos by Amanda Hatfield

Los Campesinos! / Speedy Ortiz @ Irving Plaza - 1/22/14
Los Campesinos!
Speedy Ortiz

Cardiff indie rockers Los Campesinos! are over in the US for a short tour supporting their newest LP, No Blues, which hit NYC's Irving Plaza last night (1/22). The band were characteristically enthusiastic and gave us a good mix of the old and the new. Speedy Ortiz opened, and pictures of both bands (including one of Los Campesinos' setlist, though it may not be 100% accurate) are in this post.

Speedy Ortiz have a ton of other dates coming up, and now that last night's show is in the past, they've added another in NYC. They'll be the previously-unannounced guests at the Golden Ratio/Shea Stadium/My Social List-presented Brooklyn Night Bazaar on February 7 with Krill, Odonis Odonis, Heeney, Infinity Girl and Blessed State (update: though Blessed State are listed on BK Bazaar's site, they're not actually playing). Like all Night Bazaar shows, that one is FREE, but if you want to skip the line, you can RSVP.

Speedy will also be doing an 8 PM in-store at Other Music on February 10, the day before their Real Hair EP comes out.

Updated Speedy Ortiz dates are listed, along with more pics, below...

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Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

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Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Los Campesinos!

Speedy Ortiz -- 2014 Tour Dates
01/22 - New York, NY at Irving Plaza w/ Los Campesinos!
02/07 - Brooklyn, NY at Brooklyn Night Bazaar **
02/08 - Cambridge, MA at Tasty Burger
02/10 - New York, NY at Other Music (8pm in-store)
02/13 - Birmingham, UK at Hare and Hounds*
02/14 - Leeds, UK at Brudenell Social Club*
02/15 - Glasgow, UK at Broadcast*
02/16 - Manchester, UK at Deaf Institute*
02/19 - London, UK at Lexington, presented by ATP Festival*
02/20 - Brighton, UK at Green Door Store*
02/21 - Paris, FR at Fireworks Festival at Trabendo
02/22 - Lille, FR at La Peniche
02/24 - Antwerp, BE at Trix^
02/25 - Amsterdam, NL at Paradiso (Upstairs)^
02/26 - Hamburg, DE at Turmzimmer in Uebel & Gefaehrlich%
02/27 - Copenhagen, DK at BETA
02/28 - Berlin, DE at Magnet Club%
03/01 - Vienna, AT at Flex (Halle)
03/06 - Washington, DC at Black Cat
03/07 - Savannah, GA at Savannah Stopover
03/08 - New Orleans, LA at Saturn Bar
03/10 - McAllen, TX at GALAX Z FAIR III
03/11-16 - Austin, TX at you know
03/27 San Francisco, CA at Slim's #
03/28 Los Angeles, CA at El Rey Theatre #
03/29 San Diego, CA at Casbah #
03/30 Pioneertown, CA at Pappy & Harriet's Pioneertown #
04/01 Phoenix, AZ at The Crescent Ballroom #
04/02 Las Vegas, NV at Beauty Bar #
04/03 Salt Lake City, UT at Urban Lounge #
04/05 Missoula, MT at Top Hat #
04/07 Calgary, Alberta at Republik #
04/08 Edmonton, Alberta at Starlite Room #
04/10 Vancouver, British Columbia at Rickshaw Theatre #
04/11 Victoria, British Columbia at Lucky Bar #
04/12 Seattle, WA at Neptune Theatre #

** - w/ Krill, Odonis Odonis, Heeney, Infinity Girl, Blessed State
* - w/ Joanna Gruesome
^ - w/ Eagulls
% - w/ Jealously Mountain Duo
# - w/ Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks

---

      

Comments (19)

Looks like this Amanda Hatfield chick had a serious intercourse from behind the lens with Speedy's bassist. 00% of the pics are of him or involve him. Hope she got his number...

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:18 AM

^90%

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:19 AM

Lc killed it

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:27 AM

setlist is accurate, the encore had to be cut short due to a broken kick drum pedal but they played Heart Swells/Pacific Daylight Time followed by In Medias Res

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:34 AM

So Speedy Ortiz chick wears a wool knit hat when it's normal out, but when it's below zero with a wind chill she's all hatless? Just smh ...

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:48 AM

10:18 maybe it's because he isn't wearing that stupid flatbrim wook hat for once.

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:49 AM

<333 lc, decent crowd too.

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 10:51 AM

any moshing for LC?

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 11:45 AM

There was some mild moshing for LC.

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 12:30 PM

@10:18. It's only 9 out of 12. That's only 75%!
But if fairness, the bass player WAS dead center on the stage. So kind hard to avoid him.

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 12:34 PM

freedom trail? more like "small dong trail" jahhahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 12:45 PM

10:48 she wears that hat in the summer because her whole act involves pretending that her band is on the 1994 Lollapalooza tour (second stage, between Cell and St.Johnny).

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 1:04 PM

It's soooo hot in here. Man, Irving Plaza has the worst HVAC system.

Better wear my woo...wait! Where is my hat?!

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 1:05 PM

Didnt half of los campesinos leave the band?I loved the first two albums then they just nose-dived into forgettable emo shit. A waste.

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 1:45 PM

The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Hare" can be interpreted as either the vocative of Hari, another name of Vishnu meaning "he who removes illusion", or as the vocative of Harā,[3] a name of Rādhā,[4] Krishna's eternal consort or Shakti. According to A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, Harā refers to "the energy of God" while Krishna and Rama refer to God himself, meaning "He who is All-Attractive" and "He who is the Source of All Pleasure".[5] Rama refers to Ramachandra Lord Ram which is one of the incarnations of Krishna.[6] In the hymn Vishnu Sahasranama spoken by Bhishma in praise of Krishna after the Kurukshetra War, Krishna is also called Rama.[7] Rama can also be a shortened form of Balarama, Krishna's first expansion.[8]

The mantra is repeated, either out loud (kirtan), softly to oneself (japa), or internally within the mind. A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami describes the process of chanting the Maha Mantra as follows:

Krishna consciousness is not an artificial imposition on the mind; this consciousness is the original energy of the living entity. When we hear the transcendental vibration, this consciousness is revived ...[]... This chanting of 'Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna, Hare Hare / Hare Rama, Hare Rama, Rama Rama, Hare Hare' is directly enacted from the spiritual platform, and thus this sound vibration surpasses all lower strata of consciousness - namely sensual, mental, and intellectual ...[]... As such anyone can take part in the chanting without any previous qualification.

—[9]
History[edit]

An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg
Hindu History
Philosophy[show]
Deities[show]
Scriptures[show]
Practices[show]
Philosophers and saints[show]
Other topics[show]
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
Part of a series on
Vaishnavism
Vishnu.jpg
Supreme Deity
Vishnu Krishna Rama
Important deities
Dashavatara
Matsya Kurma Varaha Narasimha Vamana Parasurama Rama Krishna Balarama OR Buddha Kalki
Other Avatars
Mohini Nara-Narayana Hayagriva
Related
Lakshmi Sita Hanuman Shesha
Texts
Vedas Upanishads Bhagavad Gita Divya Prabandha Ramcharitmanas
Puranas
Vishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Agni
Sampradayas
Sri (Vishishtadvaita) Brahma (Dvaita, Acintyabhedabheda) Rudra (Shuddhadvaita) Nimbarka (Dvaitadvaita)
Philosopher-Acharyas
Nammalvar Yamunacharya Ramanuja Madhva Chaitanya Vallabha Sankardev Madhavdev Nimbarka Pillai Lokacharya Prabhupada Vedanta Desika Manavala Mamunigal
Related traditions
Pushtimarg Bhagavatism ISKCON Swaminarayan Ekasarana Pranami Ramanandi Vaikhanasas
Portal icon Hinduism portal
v t e
The mantra is first attested in the kalisaṇṭāraṇopaniṣad (Kali Santarana Upanishad), a Vaishnava Upanishad associated with the Krishna Yajurveda. In this Upanishad, Narada is instructed by Brahma (in the translation of K. N. Aiyar):

Hearken to that which all Shrutis (the Vedas) keep secret and hidden, through which one may cross the Samsara (mundane existence) of Kali. He shakes off (the evil effects of) Kali through the mere uttering of the name of Lord Narayana, who is the primeval Purusha.

Narada asks to be told this name of Narayana, and Brahma replies[citation needed]:

Hare Rama Hare Rama, Rama Rama Hare Hare, Hare Krishna Hare Krishna, Krishna Krishna Hare Hare; These sixteen names are destructive of the evil effects of Kali. No better means than this is to be seen in all the Vedas.

The mantra was popularized by Chaitanya Mahaprabhu roughly around 1500 CE when he began his mission to spread this mantra publicly to "every town and village" in the world, travelling throughout India, and especially within the areas of Bengal and Odisha.[10] Some versions of the Kali Santarana Upanishad give the mantra with Hare Rama preceding Hare Krishna(as quoted above), and others with Hare Krishna preceding Hare Rama. as in Navadvipa version of the manuscript. The latter format is by far the more common within the Vaishnava traditions.[11] It is a common belief that the mantra is equally potent when spoken in either order.[12]

A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a devotee of Krishna in disciplic succession, on the order of his guru, Srila Bhaktisiddhanta Sarasvati Thakura, brought the teachings of Sri Chaitanya from Bharat (India) and single-handedly took the responsibility of spreading them around the Western world. Beginning in New York 1965, he encircled the globe fourteen times in the final eleven years of his life, thus making 'Hare Krishna' a well-known phrase in many parts of the world.[13]The Hare Krishna mantra is composed of Sanskrit names in the singular vocative case: Hare, Krishna, and Rama (in Anglicized spelling). The (IAST) transliteration from the Devanagari (devanāgarī) script of the three vocatives is hare, kṛṣṇa and rāma, pronounced [ˈɦɐreː], [ˈkr̩ʂɳɐ] and [ˈraːmɐ]. It is a poetic stanza in anuṣṭubh meter (A quatrain of four lines (pāda) of eight syllables).

hare kṛṣṇa hare kṛṣṇa

kṛṣṇa kṛṣṇa hare hare

hare rāma hare rāma

rāma rāma hare hare

"Ha

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 2:44 PM

tl;dr 2:44

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 7:27 PM

The girl on keys doesn't seem that into it.

Posted by Anonymous | January 23, 2014 9:00 PM

dude got fattt

Posted by Anonymous | January 24, 2014 10:54 AM

I love this band

Posted by Sharkey | February 26, 2014 5:14 AM

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