Recent Posts in interviews

August 17, 2015

by Andrew Sacher

photo: Lucero at Riot Fest Chicago 2014 (more by James Richards IV)
Lucero

Lucero will release their new album All A Man Should Do on September 18 via ATO. After two of the band's biggest-sounding horn-filled records, much of the new one sees them returning to a softer sound. It's actually the first album in their 15+ year career where frontman Ben Nichols played only acoustic guitar. We already posted first single "Went Looking For Warren Zevon's Los Angeles," which is a great example of that softer/acoustic sound, though new single "Can't You Hear Them Howl" brings the horns back and more closely recalls the last two records. Listen to that one below.

I recently spoke with Ben about the new record, their upcoming Sailor Jerry-presented tour, looking back on lyrics he wrote 15 years ago, True Detective, the unlikely Lucero sample A$AP Rocky used on his new album, and more. You can read that interview below.

The band's tour hits NYC on October 8 at Webster Hall. Tickets for that show are still available. All dates are listed below.

Continue reading "Lucero talk new LP, upcoming Sailor Jerry tour, A$AP Rocky sampling them, True Detective & more +++ new song stream"

April 16, 2015

by Milos Markicevic

shlohmo

LA producer Shlohmo is currently out on a headlining tour in support of his new album Dark Red. The album was a split release with the Matador Records-owned True Panther and Shlohmo's own label WEDIDIT. That tour, with WEDIDIT labelmates Purple and Nick Melons, hit Irving Plaza in NYC on Saturday (4/11). FACT was there and wrote, "Shlohmo and his live band hit the stage bringing a longing gothic romance punctuated by chunky rhythms and melancholy guitar, exhibiting the same energy we heard on his brand new album". We caught up with Shlohmo ahead of his Friday Chicago show, to discuss life on the road, running a label, hip hop, metal, Flying Lotus, future and past collaborations and more.

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BV: Congrats on the release of the new album, how's the tour so far? Any stories?

Shlohmo: Oh man, a few things! The first show we did was at SXSW. We played two shows there, the first was at Fader Fort and then the second one-- we did a WEDIDIT showcase (our label). This blacked out girl just jumped up on stage and fell onto a stack of DI inputs. *laughs* Her hands just went only on the DI inputs and pushed them all over and I almost had to throw her off stage. but I composed myself and said "excuse me, can you please leave?" So that was like our second show. That almost got ruined by a drunk girl. Besides that, most of the shows have been pretty good. Nothing too crazy! We've had like three or four tour managers so far on this tour. That's probably the funniest part.

BV: Why so many?

Shlohmo: [laughs] problems, we'll just leave it at that.

BV: You started your label/collective WEDIDIT when you were still in high school, can you tell us a little about that?

Shlohmo: Basically it was me and group of friends. We went to high school together. LA is kind of funny, there's five to ten high schools from which everyone knows each other from. We had a group of friends from all these different schools and everyone we were friends with was kind of a creative person, making music, rapping, or making art. We would hang out and fucking make beats, freestyle. We were kind of the in-house production crew for all our older friends who rapped and stuff. At some point we were just kind of "fuck it, we gotta call the crew something" so it came about organically. It wasn't anything when we started it, we were like 17, and then I guess by the time we started college a bunch of us had started MySpaces (when the music MySpace thing was going). So it was just a big community of people sharing music and stuff. So around that point we started a website that was just a really bad blogspot that was just kind of our own stuff, promoting our own releases. It was a way for us to share with each other more so than other people while we were in colleges and different schools in the country.

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Continue reading "an interview with Shlohmo (on running a label, dealing with others, Flying Lotus, Burzum, Yung Gud, Tidal & more)"

March 6, 2015

interview by Jonathan Dick

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After a decade of providing an alternate and award-winning perspective on the late night show's formula of acerbic wit, topical humor, and the blessedly obligatory absurdist tendencies, Craig Ferguson stepped down last year as the host of The Late Late Show. An immediate anomaly amongst his contemporaries, Ferguson's role as host was defined by a narrative that was as unabashedly honest as it was hilarious. The Scotland native took a different approach to what's often a pessimistic, self-loathing MO for the late night context, choosing instead to disarm otherwise gut wrenching realities by telling stories both from his own personal life as well as those from multiple lives ranging from the famous to the infamous to the wonderfully normal. Since leaving The Late Late Show, Ferguson has signed on to star as an agoraphobe who leaves his apartment for the first time in 11 years in a pilot for ABC, The King of 7B.

In the meantime, the quick-witted and incredibly charming comedian who made his start in standup is currently on the road with his Hot and Grumpy Tour: Walking the Earth tour, which includes three shows at Town Hall, starting tonight (3/6). He was originally supposed to play last night (Thursday, 3/5) but that show was moved to Saturday (3/7) at 10 PM. There's a 7 PM show on Saturday, too, and tickets to all three are still avaialable. Some other dates on his tour have been rescheduled due to The King of 7B, and all are listed below.

Ahead of these shows, we talked to Ferguson about the tour, the new pilot, his time working as a bouncer at legendary East Village club Save the Robots, and more.

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I wanted to ask you about the new show you've got lined up, The King of 7B. Going from something that's seemingly a bit looser like The Late Late Show to something that's a bit more scripted and focused like a television series, was there a bit of a challenge for you with that transition or was the change fairly natural?

Strangely enough, going into the idea of a pilot - should this show be picked up because you never know with these things - but if it gets picked up and then it goes on a journey into who knows where the hell it ends up, I mean, it's scripted but then an open-ended story, whereas late night for all its freedom is not an open-ended story. You're doing a monologue, you're doing some sketches, you've got a couple of guests, and then this and that. No matter how much freedom you can create for yourself within that with your Robot Skeleton or your fake horse, it's very constricted, whereas going into a story which begins with a man who's facing a crisis and should that story be opened up and goes to series and the series goes on for a length of time, you don't know where it's gonna go. So I feel like it's more open-ended. In the construction of it, it's more scripted absolutely, but that's fine because the people who are writing it are very, very close to that script. (Laughs)

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Continue reading "an interview with Craig Ferguson on his standup tour (3 NYC shows this weekend), new ABC comedy pilot and more"

February 12, 2015

interview by Jonathan Dick, photos by Michael Wilhoite

Buster Poindexter

David Johansen wears enough hats that discerning between the art and the artist can prove to be a difficult task. It's an aesthetic that speaks both to his influence as a founding member/vocalist of seminal protopunk innovators The New York Dolls and what's been an uninhibited pursuit of his own artistic vision in a number of ways from various musical side projects to film roles. Johansen's Buster Poindexter persona that while primarily known for the late 80s hit "Hot Hot Hot," a song he's admitted to loathing, but nonetheless helped to propel the persona itself as well as establish his own versatility as an artist. This month sees the return of Buster Poindexter with a series of performances at the Café Carlyle from February 10-21 (tickets). We spoke to Johansen about the performances as well as his own history growing up surrounded by music and when listeners can expect to see The New York Dolls again.

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BV: You're revisiting the Buster Poindexter persona again with the series of shows at the Café Carlyle. What was the motivation to do this now?

DJ: The Buster thing, the way it's gone down, I've been doing the New York Dolls for like eight years. We started out wanting to do one show, and then we played for eight years and making pretty records. I just decided to give that a break for a while and be home. Instead of New York being a place where you just keep your stuff, I decided to live here awhile, and to make a living. I decided to do a show that could only be played in New York.

Speaking of which you actually had a performance with the Arcade Fire there in Brooklyn. How did that come about?

Oh, they just called and asked if we'd come out there and do a number with them.

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Continue reading "an interview w/ David Johansen aka Buster Poindexter (on the Cafe Carlye residency, NY Dolls status, Mitch Ryder & more)"

January 17, 2015

by Jonathan Dick

Marky Ramone

Marky Ramone will take the stage at the Gramercy Theater on 1/17 to celebrate the upcoming publication of his memoirs, Punk Rock Blitzkrieg: My Life as a Ramone. Sitting behind the drums for one of the greatest bands in rock history for fifteen years provided more than enough perspective for the Brooklyn native who will turn 59 later this year. The timing is especially poignant given that last July saw the death of Tommy Ramone who'd been the last surviving member of the original lineup. It was Tommy who would recommend Marky to replace himself when he left the band in 1978, setting in motion another chapter for a band that had already established itself as one of punk rock's most iconic groups. I recently spoke with Mark to discuss the book release show (featuring Andrew W K), his earliest days with another genre-defining band, and why punk rock is still the best form of exercise.

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BV: Let's talk about the book for a second, Mark. What made you feel this was the right time for an autobiography?

Marky: Well, it took five years in the making, and the process of writing it was a year and a half. I read all the Ramones books, and there were a lot of exaggerations, and I just wanted to clear them, so in my book I did. I just don't like when people try to change history for their own reasons. I'm not gonna mention names. I'm just saying that I believe what happened happened and that's what happened. To change history for one's idea of sensationalism I think is wrong. On the Internet, especially these days, a blog or a writer can say anything and then everybody believes that, y'know what I'm saying? I'm sure you've experienced that. That's where a lot of people unfortunately get their news. In my book it's my whole life story beginning with the music scene plus growing up in Brooklyn, New York, and then later on after me, Johnny, and Joey decided to retire in '94 and then our last show was in '96. It's a lot more informative. Obviously it has a lot to do with time being in the band for fifteen years and doing 1700 shows. I absorbed everything and what you read, that's the result.

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Continue reading "an interview w/ Marky Ramone (whose autobiography is out now) --- catch him on tour"

December 5, 2014

by Bill Pearis

Hookworms' MB @ BV CMJ 2013 (more by Chris La Putt)
MB of Hookworms

Hookworms just released their terrific new album The Hum which further's the band's motorik psych, taking last year's adrenalized "Radio Tokyo" single (which they re-recorded for this LP) and further stepping on the gas. It is, as they say, a blast. While the band are signed to Domino's Weird World label, they do almost everything in-house. Frontman MJ produces the records in his Suburban Home studios (he produces lots of other UK bands too, like Joanna Gruesome and Eagulls), and the sleeves are all designed by guitarist JW. Hookworms' members, who stick to initials, all have day jobs and have no plans of giving them up for rock n' roll stardom.

That said, they'll be taking leaves of absence when they tour North America this Spring, including two NYC shows in April. Tickets to Palisades on 4/18 are already on sale, and tickets for their Rough Trade show on 4/17 go on sale today (12/5) at noon. Hookworms' shows are loud and intense and not to be missed.

The band's bassist, MB, talked with BV about The Hum, balancing their DIY spirit with growing acclaim, in-jokes, recollections of playing Death by Audio, his Top 10 albums of 2014, and more:


The Hum is a more upbeat record than Pearl Mystic. Was that intentional?

100%. We realised after we'd finished the last record that a lot of it was very slow numbers. We only ever played Away/Towards, Form & Function and Preservation live from that album, which is only a third of the record. We wanted the new album to be more representative of our live show, so we started writing some faster songs that would work well in the set. Radio Tokyo was actually written before Pearl Mystic was even released, and that became the starting point for the album; we enjoyed how people reacted to that song live. Our band definitely has a funny thing where when we're playing, you look up and see a crowd of people stood perfectly still with their arms crossed, then the second the set finishes they all rush up to tell you how amazing it was. I'm not saying we want people fighting and head-walking while we play, but we realised that was perhaps our fault for not being particularly upbeat.

More below...

Continue reading "Hookworms talk 'The Hum,' DIY, DbA, Top 10 of 2014 and more in BV interview"

November 17, 2014

by Bill Pearis

Meemaw visits 'Wake Up, White People' host David Cross on 'The Heart, She Holler' S3
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John Lee and Vernon Chatman have been weirding out late night television viewers for 10 years as the primary creative forces behind PFFR: first with not-for-kids kids show Wonder Showzen, then with the hallucinogenic, hard-to-look-at Xavier: Renegade Angel and, most recently, on the Southern Gothic soap opera The Heart, She Holler. (They were also writers and producers on Jon Glazer's awesome Delocated.) The thread running through them all: Lee and Chatman's gleeful dismantling of American culture, labyrinthine and pun-filled dialogue, and a desire to see viewers' jaws drop.

Season three of The Heart She, Holler debuts on December 1 on Adult Swim, starring folks like Patton Oswalt, David Cross, Amy Sedaris, Scott Adsit (30 Rock), Steve Little (East Bound and Down) and other familiar comedy faces. You can watch the trailer below. There's a Season Three preview screening on Tuesday (11/18) at BAM at 7:30 with a Q&A with Q&A with Adsit (who just joined the cast) and John Lee. It's free and you can RSVP to attend, though entry is based on capacity. We're also giving away a pair of guaranteed passes as well, and details on that are below.

PFFR's John Lee
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In addition to working on his own shows, John Lee has directed episodes of Broad City and a few music videos, and he used to be in a couple bands: jokey late-'90s indie rockers Muckafurgason, and a pre-TV PFFR who put out records in the early '00s. Full disclosure: I've known John for almost 20 years, and he took a few minutes away from scarring Middle America's eyeballs to talk about The Heart She Holler, food courts, unprecedented sexual positions, Morrissey, David Lynch and the difficulties of wrangling an ex-President for a cameo. PFFR are infamous for their non-interview interviews, but there's at least a little directness here.

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BrooklynVegan: So what are you working on now? Season 3 of The Heart She Holler is in the can, right?

John Lee: Yeah, it's in the trash can as we say. The trash can of America. Any of your local mall food courts, that's what we call the trash can. We call the South "Food Court America" up here in the North.

BV: How much time have you and Vernon spent in the South?

JL: (Laughs) Together or separately? Well, together it was all in sin. It felt like forever but it was only six minutes. Um, separately? Through touring... it would add up to a handful of peanuts. A bag of boiled peanuts, that's how long I've spent in the South. But the thing is you don't even need to spend time in the South to understand American culture, like American hillbilly ideals. All you have to do is go 40 minutes outside of any city and you're there. America, it's all that. It's everywhere you go. The South is just the place everyone says "Oh, it's that." But it's not, it's everywhere.

Did you think you'd be doing a third season of The Heart, She Holler when you guys came up with the idea?

We, as in PFFR, all our shows that are self-created have never gotten past a second season. This is the first time we've broken the curse. Wonder Showzen was only two seasons, Xavier was only two seasons. Delocated made it longer, but that wasn't just our show. It was a thrill, but we were also scared because when you break a curse you never know what sort of demon's going to show up. The undead will rise? Your nightmares will become reality? We'll see.


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Continue reading "Adult Swim's 'The Heart, She Holler' returns for S3 (screening at BAM); creator John Lee discusses Broad City, his old bands, casting an ex-president, weirdness & more in BV interview"

November 4, 2014

by Rahill Jamalifard

Fat White Family @ BV CMJ 2014 (more by Chris La Putt)
FWF

It's been a week since Fat White Family's first stint at CMJ and still, the feverish feeling remains. Their music is raunchy, fiery, and disturbing. Envision a filthy romp outside your parents' house in the backseat of your unapproved boyfriend's car. It leaves one feeling aroused, soiled and liberated. The band, who recently relocated to NYC, just saw their album Champagne Holocaust reissued by Fat Possum. Folks in Los Angeles, can see them tonight at the Echo, and FWF will return in Austin for Fun Fun Fun Fest this weekend. They're also planning to reactivate their monthly "Slide-In" parties in NYC as well. Stay tuned.

At Fat White Family's savage apex is frontman Lias Saoudi, a man whose stage antics are a seductive mess of freakish behavior and cunning dexterity. He was born to perform and his transcendental journeys sear a lasting impression. Saudi has no inhibitions. More accurately: He doesn't give a flying fuck. He prowls the stage like a lunatic, flaccid penis protruding and available for public onanism. In fact, the furthest thing from Saoudi's mind during his performance seems to be any sort of rational thought. I sat with Saoudi at a restaurant in the East Village and listened as he enlightened on his band, their wild stage show, provocative lyrics, drugs, art, and how to stay dark and miserable in a fucked up world.

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BV: Lets start by giving some insight on the birth of the band, how did it happen, when and where.

Lias: It happened kind of in stages over a period of about three or four years, with different members. Originally we were a band called the Saoudi's, which was really crappy ill-thought punk rock. We use to just do a lot of cocaine and listen to Bruce Springsteen, there wasn't much thought in it. That was kind of the genesis of this band. Obviously we didn't get very far with that and the money for coke ran out, so times got tough and we had to figure out how to make decent music. So we started listening to good records, in an attempt at broadening our horizons.

Well, that sort of answers my next question, but was there a vision in the beginning or did the vision manifest as the band developed?

There was a kind of a vision, it was a very unclear, vague, bitter vision. It became more intricate and more personal as it went on, and it continues to do so. There was a general ethos that was kind of like, well, we're not gunna go to East London and try to be a successful band, we're not even gunna do any gigs. So we just sat in this house for a year and a half trying to write songs, and driving each other up the fucking wall. Then, when we finally did start gigging it didn't take very long to be signed to a very small independent label, so this became our proper thing, our grown up effort.

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Continue reading "Fat White Family relocated to NYC, monthly residency soon; frontman Lias talks sex, drugs & rock n' roll in BV interview"

October 16, 2014

by Jessica Pilot

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Ariel Pink @ Baby's All Right 10/2/2014 (via @deeaannaaa)
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Ariel Pink may have dropped the "Haunted Graffiti" from his name but remains resolutely idiosyncratic on his new double album opus, pom pom. At times chaotic, somehow Ariel pulls it all together in a manner only he would. Fusing what feels like multiple songs together into one coherent thing seems like a huge pain in the ass but here we have Ariel referencing everything from Devo-like lunacy to the drama of King Diamond to the earworm madness of commercial jingles. Some brains just work that way.

Ariel was in NYC earlier this month for a beyond-packed, scene-of-all-scenes, post-midnight show at Baby's All Right. Though Madonna was nowhere to be found, the audience was a crazy who's who of Brooklyn music, best represented by the trio of DJs for the night: Pitchfork's Ryan Schreiber, 285 Kent/Palisades/Webster Hall booker Ric Leichtung and Baby's' own Billy Jones (who was also celebrating a birthday that night). Sky Ferreira, Mac DeMarco, members of Real Estate, John Norris and Marnie the Dog were just a few of the familiar faces who came out to see Mr. Pink and drink Pink Babies at the intimate Williamsburg show. Featuring mostly songs off the new album, the late late late set showed off the breadth of his vision, from the totally out-there "Dinosaur Carebears" to album-closing highlight "Dayzed Inn Daydreams."

Ariel was still or back in NYC because apparently he just visited the kids of PS 22 in Staten Island to play some songs with them (they famously covered him a few years ago). Stay tuned for the video of that to surface.

One day before the Baby's show, BrooklynVegan interviewer Jessica Pilot visited Ariel Pink at his hotel. Here is their conversation...

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Jessica: Are there any stories behind any of the new tracks that you might want to share that might be interesting to tell?

Ariel: You're making me think way too hard already. [laughs] I mean they all have their own stories.

Jessica: Is there one in particular that you think would make a cool story?

Ariel: Let me think about it for a second.

What's your favorite color?

Okay, easy: none. I don't have any favorite colors whatsoever. I've got a really long-winded explanation for it too. I'm colorblind, but that's not the reason. I'm one of the least artistically minded people you've ever met. I have no aesthetical preferences for anything.

Is that true?

It's the truth! Despite my wonderful wardrobe and attire, I actually have zero--it's only because people leave good clothes at my house that are very stylish themselves. I actually don't have a favorite color. I don't think in color.


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Continue reading "an interview with Ariel Pink (who isn't working with Madonna, played Baby's All Right & with the PS 22 Chorus)"

September 24, 2014

by Jonathan Dick

'I grabbed hold of it, and the rhetoric of change was rock and roll, the platform for change was rock and roll, the desirability, the inevitability of change was rock and roll.'

Bob Geldof and The Boomtown Rats
Boomtown Rats
Boomtown Rats

Bob Geldof's legacy is a given. Whether with the humanitarian efforts of projects like Live Aid, Band Aid, and Live 8, or the musical endeavors of The Boomtown Rats and his own solo work, the honorary Knight of the British Empire has done more than offer a service to the entertainment industry. The 1980s saw Geldof's name become synonymous with philanthropic empathy that went far beyond the well-timed rhetoric of rock and roll's cause promotion. Geldof backed the attitude with something tangible and inspiring, bringing together events that raised awareness for those often ignored issues of worldwide poverty and famine. Talking to Geldof reveals a kind of casual dismissal of the work he's done as being anything more than a product of rock and roll's power or at least the power it once wielded. With upcoming Boomtown Rats shows this weekend in NYC and Boston, announced just months ago and months after the tragic death of his daughter Peaches (most likely not coincidental timing), Bob spoke with BrooklynVegan about the endearing simplicity and therapy that music still affords him and why he thinks music isn't the force it once was for change and progression.

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BV: You've got these two Boomtown Rats shows coming up in New York and Boston. Obviously in the context of everything you've done both in the musical and in the humanitarian realm, reunion gigs seem almost like a no-brainer. What is it that continues to drive you now after all these years?

BG: Time is short. Curiosity. The road less traveled. I think those things. I mean, you know, in the course of this conversation you might say something that sort of piques my interest or I sort of ask you about it, and we go way off piece on the interview. Some people come out of that or something. That tends to be what happens, but the spine of it all - and I'm not trying to drag the conversation this way - but the spine of it all is music, because practically everything that happens spins off of that. I need to come back to the music thing, and I know this sounds completely ridiculous and cliché, but it's completely true. Last night we were playing in Cornwall at a festival there, tomorrow I'm going over to Missouri, and then coming back here to do another gig, and then going back to New York and Boston for those shows. Really you don't need to do that, not at this stage in the game, but I absolutely love it. Just beyond love it. It's a pure function - a necessary function for me. That function itself is incredibly cathartic if you've got a load of stuff going on in your head and in your life, and it works itself out whether in songs or on stage. There's two sort of parts of that. One's the solo stuff I do, and that's sort of internalized. I play the guitar, and I talk. The gigs kick off. And then the Rats, which is a different character like a sort of Bobby Boomtown comes out in a snakeskin suit and something else goes off. I know it's something a million rock and roll guys say, but it's absolutely true. I'd give up everything else, but I wouldn't give up that.

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Continue reading "an interview w/ Bob Geldof (on the Boomtown Rats shows, U2, the importance (or non-importance) of Rock n Roll & more)"

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