Recent Posts in venues

April 16, 2014

Williamsburg Park last year (more by Dylan Johnson)
Williamsburg Park

As touched on in the Northside Festival lineup additions we just posted, the annual Northside Festival (June 12-19) will be hosting concerts at what-used-to-be Williamsburg Park at North 12th and Kent in North Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The name of the venue has changed to 50 Kent which much like 285 Kent is named after its actual address. June 13 and 14 shows with The War on Drugs ($20 adv, $25 day of) and Beirut ($35 adv and day of), which are happening during the actual Northside Festival, will kick off " a summer-long Northside Summer Concert Series at 50 Kent", though no other shows as part of that series have been announced yet.

April 10, 2014

digital rendering of Pier 97...
Pier 97

As we mentioned in the Robyn / Roykskopp tour announcement post, NYC is getting a new summer venue this year, Pier 97, a 5,000+ capacity venue which will be booked by Live Nation and part of Hudson River Park. It's located on the Hudson River at 57th St. That's a digital version of what it will look like, above.

In addition to the Robyn/Royksopp show on August 20, there's also a Thievery Corporation show on August 15, and others which are listed below, plus more TBA. Tickets for all Pier 97 shows go on sale Friday (4/11) at noon, except the Thievery Corporation show which goes on sale Friday, April 18 at 10 AM.

Hopefully they have more luck than Bowery Presents did with Pier 26 which won't be returning this year due to noise complaints.

Initial list of Pier 97 shows below...

Continue reading "new NYC summer venue Pier 97 initial schedule & tix info"

April 8, 2014

by Bill Pearis

confetti rains at Lada Gaga's Roseland farewell, 4/7/2014 (photo by @talithaanne)
Roseland

Roseland this morning (photo via @sayitaintsosis)
Roseland

Roseland opened in New York in 1919 and hosted icons like Count Basie in the Thirties. It relocated to its 52nd Street home (a former skating rink called Gay Blades) in the late Fifties, where a display inside touted the number of couples who'd met there and married. In the Seventies and Eighties, the spot was a disco haven; in the Nineties its 3,500-capacity crowds moshed to Nirvana and Red Hot Chili Peppers. Its next occupants will be a 59-story apartment building, according to the New Yorker.

As a Manhattan native, chances are Gaga has many connections to the club, but she didn't regale the crowd with any personal stories about transformative nights on Roseland's famously springy dance floor (she earlier told a reporter about a Franz Ferdinand show there during her senior year of high school where she broke her nose in the pit). Instead, she stuck to her usual self-empowerment lectures ("Do you love you? Then scream!") and spent an outsized amount of time bidding farewell to the female dancer who slithered across the stage with her for Artpop's squelchy bisexual romp "Sexx Dreams." - [Rolling Stone]

Lada Gaga's seven-show run at Roseland came to a close last night (4/7) and with it the end of one of New York City's most famous clubs which had been in its present location since 1958.

Roseland was also home to the annual, over-the-top gay dancefest The Black Party and The Village Voice has a cover story on it, the venue and the changing face (and location) of club culture in NYC:

Pevner scouted other venues, but the Black Party not only needs a dance floor large enough to accommodate thousands of people, but also an entire weekend to install its own soundsystem and light rigs. The Saint at Large, which has held the party at Roseland for a quarter century, had a two-year option extending through 2015. "I told my lawyer to write a letter to address that we employ a staff full-time to work on this," Pevner says, "and if you're going to renege, here's the settlement." Pevner insisted that Ginsberg keep the club open at least through the third weekend in March, the one nearest the vernal equinox, which the party celebrates. According to Pevner, "They didn't want to end with the Black Party." So Ginsberg ended up with a win-win: Gaga gets reams of publicity and the club goes out in a blaze of glory.

Still, serious dance enthusiasts will always remember the club more for its unobstructed quarter-acre dance floor than as a midsize concert venue. Everything about Roseland was outsize, right down to its 14 coat-check windows.

More than anything, Roseland's closing marks the most painful sign to date that New York City's big rooms have become an endangered species. That a luxury residential space will likely replace it confirms the main culprit: an insatiable appetite for upscale housing that has transformed Manhattan, from the financial district to Harlem and beyond -- what Fordham professor Mark Caldwell, author of New York Night: The Mystique and Its History, has called "galloping gentrification."

I saw a lot of shows at Roseland, though mostly in the '90s -- Blur, and Oasis come to mind and I got to go to the Rolling Stones show there in 2002. My last visit there was for Big Audio Dynamite in 2011. I was never crazy about seeing shows there, but I always dug the classic vibe. What shows did you see there?

Roseland, you'll be missed.

---

Portishead famously played their in the late 90s. I say famous because not only was it an exciting show at the time, the show was recorded for a live album and DVD. Watch the whole thing (via someone uploading it to YouTube), below...

Continue reading "Roseland, RIP"

April 7, 2014

Robyn

Swedish pop singer Robyn and her Norwegian collaborators Royksopp are working on new material and they've now announced dates for their upcoming international tour. The tour brings them to NYC for a show at new summer venue Pier 97 on August 20. No details on the new venue have been released yet, but Pier 97 (located around W. 55th) is part of Hudson River Park (which has already done summer concerts on other piers). Stay tuned for more about NYC shows happening in this location this summer.

UPDATE: NYC ticket info and "BrooklynVegan presale" password info, HERE.

All dates are listed, with the tour trailer, below...

Continue reading "Robyn & Royksopp touring, playing new NYC summer venue Pier 97 (dates)"

April 1, 2014

Deafheaven at one of 285 Kent's last shows (more by PSquared)
Deafheaven

As you probably know by now, Brooklyn DIY venue 285 Kent is closed for good. As the venue was hosting its final shows, Pitchfork filmed a documentary about the venue called "RIP 285 Kent." The description reads:

The film features interviews with the personalities that pushed 285 forward, including founder Todd P., booker/manager Ric Leichtung, and managers Kaitlin Browne and Siobhan McDonald, among others. It also includes discussion with local bookers Edan Wilbur, John Jacobson, John Barclay, and Pitchfork photographer Erez Avissar, plus interview and performance footage from Deafheaven, Fucked Up, DIIV, Dan Deacon, Pictureplane, Lodro, Wolf Eyes, DUST, and more.
Check it out below...

Continue reading "VIDEO: Pitchfork made a documentary on 285 Kent (watch)"

March 21, 2014

The Sonar compound during Maryland Deathfest 2012 (more by Fred Pessaro)
Sonar

Baltimore club Sonar (a previous home of Maryland Deathfest) has been closed for almost two years now after owner Dan McIntosh was named in a federal indictment for participating in drug distribution. Now, Baltimore Sun reports that McIntosh will be facing 10 years in prison for the crime:

The owner of Baltimore's Sonar nightclub was sentenced Thursday to 10 years in prison for his role in supervising a drug dealing and money laundering operation, federal prosecutors announced.

Daniel Gerard McIntosh, 38, of Sparks, was part of a large drug operation busted by the Drug Enforcement Agency when it seized more than 80 pounds of marijuana and $30,000 in cash from the group's headquarters in the 3500 block of Hickory Ave., in Hampden. The agency also found 30 cell phones, documentation of a plane purchased for $450,000, books showing more than $14.5 million in marijuana sales, money counters and fake IDs in the sting.

That evidence was presented at a seven-week trial, during which prosecutors said McIntosh orchestrated and received large shipments of marijuana from California to distribute to local dealers in the Baltimore area since 2006.

Read more at the Baltimore Sun.

March 20, 2014

Webster Hall marquee, June 2012 (more by Dominick Mastrangelo)
Bowery Presents

Webster Hall's 1400 capacity Grand Ballroom has long been a place that Bowery Presents books concerts. It's there they can put artists that are theoretically too big for Bowery Ballroom and too small for Terminal 5.

A powerful force in the music industry, Bowery Presents can hold on to a band's NYC concert history for the length of its career by placing the band in rooms of various sizes. They have options: tiny Mercury Lounge to the new Rough Trade to the giant Terminal 5 to the even bigger Barclays Center, not to mention Central Park Summerstage and Celebrate Brooklyn at the Prospect Park Bandshell, Radio City, Beacon Theater, Town Hall, and possibly a new space in Bushwick that will be Webster Hall's successor, and even MSG. But now they'll have one less.

As of September 1 (not counting shows which are already booked), Webster Hall's recently-enlarged team of five talent buyers will be doing it all themselves. They already booked the smaller rooms, but now that team will collectively book all of Webster Hall's rooms which include the Grand Ballroom, The Studio, Marlin Room, and the new Slake (formerly The Wall).

Webster Hall now counts Ric Leichtung of 285 Kent fame as one of their own. The rest of the booking team is Heath Miller, Kenny Schachter, Alex Rossiter and Laura Bo Sherman.

Is Webster Hall crazy thinking they can compete with their 1400 person room on their own? Time will tell, though maybe it doesn't matter that much since Webster Hall's regular club nights seem to do just fine for them.

An email Webster Hall sent out to booking agents reads:

We will now be better suited to maximize the artist experience and fan enjoyment by focusing on every detail for each show that Webster Hall hosts, which already includes The Studio at Webster Hall, Marlin Room at Webster Hall, and our new venue Slake (around the corner from Penn Station).

After 130 years, Webster Hall retains its local focus and has strategic alliances in place to ensure that New York City is an artist's most important experience. We welcome you to pay us a visit or to let us know when we can visit you.

Good luck Webster!

Upcoming Bowery Presents-booked shows at Webster Hall include Warpaint, Gary Numan, Sam Smith, Real Estate, Dillinger Escape Plan, Mac DeMarco, Black Lips, Tycho, Future Islands, Wye Oak, Tokyo Police Club, Elbow, The Menzingers, Old 97's, The Notwist, First Aid Kit, Kaiser Chiefs, Jagwar Ma, Tune-Yards, and more.

Slake

I didn't even fully realize this but NYC club Rebel (formerly Downtime) closed and then reopened as The Wall before changing its name to Slake. DNAinfo explains:

The club [changed its name] due to copyright concerns, [Webster Hall owner] Ballinger and his son, Tom, said at a meeting of Community Board 5's Public Safety & Quality of Life Committee [over the summer]. The decided on the switch to avoid any conflicts with a nightspot in Miami with the same name.

"They approached us, and we figured we were really early into the process with everything, that it would be a bigger issue for us to push forward with same name than for us to change it," Tom Ballinger told DNAinfo New York. "Slake, the definition means to quench your thirst or fulfill your desire, which I thought was pretty appropriate for a nightclub."

Slake, located at 251 West 31st Street in Manhattan, is part of the Webster Hall family.

March 14, 2014

verboten-williamsburg-dance-club

Itinerant dance party Verboten opens its permanent Williamsburg home tonight at N 11th St between Kent Ave and Wythe Ave. The space joins an already buzzy area of the neighborhood, around the corner from Output and Brooklyn Bowl. The space opens up with Rebel Rave: Damian Lazarus, Francesca Lombardo, Fur Coat, Ida Engberg and Pattern Drama. Check out their full schedule here.

February 26, 2014

Lit's EV location
Lit

Just last week (2/19), EV haunt Lit Lounge celebrated 12 years of good times, live music and occasional debauchery with a birthday blowout featuring DJs Jonathan Toubin, Paul Sevigny and others. Now comes word that Lit is opening a second lounge, this one in Bushwick's McKibbin Lofts. Bedford & Bowery got the scoop:

The bi-level venue, about half the size of Lit but boasting 17-foot-tall ceilings, will consist of a small upstairs restaurant, open daily and run by artist Tessa Hughes-Freeland.
The upstairs restaurant, Currant Cafe, is scheduled to open Saturday, March 16 and the downtairs bar which will be called Lit is aiming for September. As for whether the new space will book bands, co-owner Erik Foss told B&B, "As of now we have no plan for live music. But that's what we said about Lit, haha."

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