Entries tagged with: CD

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ARC

NYC's ARChive of Contemporary Music will hold their annual Holiday Record & CD Sale from December 13 - 21:

We have lots of LPs that have never been in any of our sales before--huge section of jazz and lots of rock, pop, soul, hip-hop, you name it! Quite possibly we have the most vinyl we've ever had. Prices are generally much less than you will see in local stores or on-line, since we have only a week to move them out.

The ARC sale will also feature books and videos. This sale will have more than 700 books about jazz for sale. Plus books about every topic you can imagine. Videos? We will have VHS and DVDs of all kinds, lots of old movies, some classics and some crazy stuff.

PLUS: There's the ARC Mart, sort of a thrift store within the record sale, that will have kitchen items, clothing, and all sorts of stuff.

If you're an ARC member there's their also-annual cocktail party Thursday, December 11 where you get first dibs on this year's wares.

And as we're in the giving season, you can donate unwanted records and CDs to the ARC. It's tax-deductible and they even come to you.

ARC Sale

For nearly 30 years, NYC's ARChive of Contemporary Music has been collecting, preserving and cataloging "the popular music of all cultures and races throughout the world from 1950 to the present." Lovers of physical media, the ARC, David Bowie, Jerry Leiber, Youssou N'Dour, Keith Richards, Martin Scorsese and Paul Simon are among its board of advisors. The late Lou Reed was also on the board.

The ARC gets around 250,000 recordings every year. After sorting through them, they make sure they have two best copies on a record in their collection, and sell off third copies. Which leads us to its annual Holiday Record & CD sale which will happens at ARC's Tribeca HQ (54 White St.) from Saturday, Dec 7 - Sunday, Dec 15 from 11 am - 6 pm daily. Here's what they've got this year:

25,000+ recordings - all genres and formats - 45s, LPs, CDs, cassettes,
books, posters, DVDs, VHS, magazine and a vintage flea market + yard sale!

specials: This year there is an incredible collection of punk/new wave 45s + LPs, 3 big boxes of Christmas LPs, more CDs than ever before... 100s of modern art, experimental + modern Classical LPs - Glass/Varese/Crumb/Carter/Satie. All recordings never offered before - we start fresh every sale.

Additionally, this year's sale also has a special Lou Reed section. Members of the ARC can attend the pre-sale party on Decmeber 5 with food, drink and early shopping. You can become a member by filling out this form (and giving a minimum $50 donation).

You can also donate materials. Do you have an out-of-control CD collection threatening to take over your apartment? Clean out your pile and give it to the ARC. Your trash could be someone else's treasure. And contributions are tax deductible.

Lots of room in the ARC
ARC

Since 1985, not-for-profit organization The ARChive of Contemporary Music has been collecting, preserving and providing info on "the popular music of all cultures and races throughout the world from 1950 to the present." In a world that is hurdling towards the cloud, the ARC remains obsessively devoted to physical formats and counts David Bowie, Jerry Leiber, Youssou N'Dour, Lou Reed, Keith Richards, Martin Scorsese and Paul Simon among its board of advisors.

For those of us who have too many CDs and records and are looking to clear out some personal space, the ARC is a great place to donate. As loads of people -- and record companies do just that (BrooklynVegan included) -- the ARC has duplicates and surplus, and for one week every year during the holiday season it becomes the biggest record store in NYC. This year the ARC Holiday Record & CD sale happens Dec 8 - Sunday, Dec 16 from 11 AM - 6 PM at ARC HQ (54 White Street, NY, NY) and will feature over 20,000 items, including:

Good vinyl in good condition at great prices. Remember we clean out everything after each sale, so it may seem familiar, but it's fresh, CDs are NEW donations from record companies, NOT used, returns or defects! Mostly pop and rock recordings. Collectible LPs are priced below book value. Hundreds of CDs are priced at $1 to $5 each. Cassettes + Classical LPs - 2 for $1.00 Just released NEW & HOT CDs are $5 - $10.

PLUS - 7" singles. Old + new music books, books of all kinds actually - African, Reggae & world-music releases - videos.

More details are here. ARC Members will get first dibs at this year's sale at their Holiday Cocktail party which happens on December 6 from 6 - 9 PM. If you're not a member, you can join right now and there are a number of different price levels, starting at $50.

NY Mag

Grizzly Bear are on the cover of the new issue of NY Magazine, which makes two weeks in a row that Brooklyn was prominently featured.

Despite making it into Billboard's Top 10 with their new album, Shields, the band still aren't making a lot of money.

Check out pictures from the show they just played in Chicago with Lower Dens.

And speaking of Brooklyn, get ready for Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas.

"The Artwork of Robert Pollard & Tobin Sprout" is opening in Brooklyn soon. Meanwhile check out our recent Guided by Voices pictures from both Austin and the Deluna Fest in Florida.

Crystal Castles and HEALTH play Roseland on Wednesday (10/3). We're giving away tickets here and on our Facebook too.

Also on Wednesday, M83 plays Hammerstein Ballroom and we're giving away tickets to that on Facebook too. Tickets are also still on sale.

Another Facebook contest: win tickets to see Raveonettes and Melody's Echo Chamber at Webster Hall on Friday (10/5).

The Compact Disc turns 30 years old today. The first CD pressed in America was Bruce Springsteen's Born in the USA (though Billy Joe's 52nd Street came out in Japan before that). What was the first CD you bought?

Speaking of Bruce Springsteen, Kenny's Castaways, where he used to play is hosting their final show tonight.

Producer and TV On the Radio member Dave Sitek has launched Federal Prism, "a new record label where Sitek will personally record, mix, produce, and release a series of limited edition 12-inch vinyl picture discs with a uniquely curator-driven perspective. The vinyl will be limited to 500 numbered copies each with a jacket personally hand silkscreened by Sitek."

Federal Prism's first release is "Destroyer" by Telepathe. "The b-side of the vinyl will feature a remix by Nine Inch Nails' Trent Reznor with Alessandro Cortini and Atticus Ross. Sitek adds, "I told Trent I was starting my own label and would love to have him remix something on the first release. I sent him the session and before he actually said 'YES', he sent back this mighty dark space that he, Alessandro and Atticus had built for me! I was shocked and am certain I will have to keep ripping them off for years!"" It's on sale now.

Speaking of Trent Reznor, he says his his band How To Destroy Angels, have "formally partnered with Columbia Records for our next series of releases. The first of these will be available in November and it's called An Omen EP."

Scary: Ryan Adams revealed via Twitter: "Recording a track with my new pal @deadmau5 today. Sounds like BladeRunner starring Don Henley."

More scary: As if it wasn't bad enough that Bruno Mars has been announced as the host of the 10/20 episode of SNL, they're letting him be the musical performer for that episode too!

But here's some good news: Now That's What I Call Music 83 will reportedly be the last in the series.

more stuff below...

Continue reading "ALSO: Grizzly Bear on cover of New York; CDs turned 30; Dave Sitek's new label, Trent Reznor, Ryan Adams, Deadmau5, more"

Johnny Cash

Conventional wisdom has it that CDs are selling in ever-decreasing numbers, but there's one place where business is booming: prison. A Los Angeles company called Pack Central started selling music to The USA's incarcerated in 2003, and is now doing $1 million of business every year. [Music Radar]
Racy photos of Miley Cyrus are popular in prison too.

CD vs mp3

It's little surprise that today's digital consumers are obsessed with pixels. If we buy a new digital camera, we want to know how many megapixels it is. If we buy a new high-definition television, we obsess over its picture quality: is it 720p or 1080i? What's the refresh rate? How good will it look when I'm watching the football in high-definition, or playing a game on my PlayStation?

Curiously, however, we don't appear to have the same concerns about our music. Most people, in fact, are probably unaware that the music they download on to their MP3 player sounds different to the CD version, and bears almost no relation to the original studio recording. [Telegraph]