Entries tagged with: MTA

8 result(s) displayed (1 - 8 of 8):

James Murphy Subway Symphony

While he's been busy with his Four Horseman wine bar/restaurant, James Murphy hasn't given up on his dream to change the sounds subway turnstiles make into something more symphonic. He's even got backing for it now: Heineken, who are producing videos about the "Subway Symphony" project, and they are apparently developing prototype turnstiles.

But what they don't have, is any support whatsoever from the MTA. The Transit Authority's spokesman Adam Lisberg told Gothamist, "I am familiar with James Murphy's proposal, and while I would never refer to him as 'just a musician,' I can say confidently that it is as creative as it is unworkable" and said that when the MTA gave Murphy permission to film one of his promotional videos in the Subway, the agreement included the following language:

Licensee and Agent hereby acknowledge that the MTA has informed the individual depicted in the advertisement that the concept presented in the advertisement involving the turnstiles of the New York City subway system cannot be implemented.
Murhpy, however, told Gothamist that Lisberg is "not a policy maker, he's the press guy, so I wouldn't expect him to know what our project is." Lisberg responded, saying the contract's language "seems pretty black and white."

Even if Heineken or some other benefactor was willing to pay for "Subway Symphony" to be fully implemented, the tones actually serve a specific purpose beyond annoying straphangers like Murphy:

"The tones are an ADA element for the visually impaired, and we won't mess with them--much less take turnstiles out of service and risk disabling them for an art project. (It would be a very cool project, don't get me wrong, but we can't mess with turnstiles that handle 6 million customers a day for it.)"
Murphy remains politely tenacious, with a new promotional video being released this week which you can watch below.

Continue reading "James Murphy still working on 'Subway Symphony,' has backing from Heineken but MTA still says it'll never happen"

Jeffrey Lewis

As New Yorkers who ever need to commute between Williamsburg and Manhattan surely know, the L train hasn't been running between those two boroughs on nights and weekends since late March. Luckily, it finally ends this Friday (5/22), but the struggle has been real for almost two months and Jeffrey Lewis feels it too. He's recorded a new song called "Train Song" which isn't a Vashti Bunyan cover, but an ode to the pain inflicted on us by the MTA with a chorus of "No L, no L, no L, no L, the MTA fucked us and made our lives hell." Nod along in agreement below...

Continue reading "Jeffrey Lewis writes ode to the L train being fucked (listen)"

James Murphy getting on the Bedford L (clearly at an off hour)

Remember James Murphy's idea to make the NYC subway system more musical? He's still talking about it, and was recently interviewed by the Wall Street Journal in a short video feature:

The subway sounds quite brutal, and there's a missing opportunity at the turnstile. At the moment there's this kind of unpleasant beep. Given that there's already this information in the turnstile, why don't we make it a nice sound, just make it pleasant.
The idea really came to spark when Murphy heard that the MTA were planning to switch to a tap-and-ride from the old swiping system, he saw his chance with new turnstiles. "There's already going to be a thing that makes a sound, why can't it make the nice sound?"

Unfortunately it's probably not going to happen. WSJ points out that Murphy is not the first to have this idea and, more importantly, the MTA is just not that into it. MTA spokesman Andy Lisberg told the Journal, among other things, "we don't really care." Still, Murphy is not giving up on the idea and has set up a website and an online petition for the project. You can read Murphy's plea and can hear what his "nice sounds" might sound like in that video, below....

Continue reading "listen to James Murphy's idea for a "Subway Symphony" & sign his petition to make it happen (though it probably won't)"

The L train earlier this week...(via MTA's Flickr)
The L Train

The long nightmare is over: The L Train is back. Says the MTA, "service between Broadway Junction and Manhattan resumed this afternoon, following repair work to components inside the Canarsie Tube, which connects the line between Manhattan's East Side and Brooklyn's Greenpoint and Williamsburg neighborhoods."

Woohoo! Glad to have you back. Expect delays today, though.


P.S. Manhattan, this means you can come to our free screening of the Comedy at Knitting Factory on Sunday.

photo via shaka_lulu
G Train

The MTA reports that "After working around the clock for days and testing systems all night, the first G trains for passengers started rolling at 8:55 am." Still no L though.

The Holland Tunnel is now also open to all traffic again.

Pumping out the L Train tunnels, 11/5/2012 (via MTA's Flickr)
Flooded L Train

While Irene had brought the water within a foot or two of flooding the subway entrances and ventilation gratings, Sandy's fourteen-foot surges brought the water gushing in. Half of the subway system's fourteen under-river tubes flooded. A few filled up end to end, much like the MTA's Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel. They couldn't even send workers out to assess them until after the second surge at the next high tide Tuesday morning.

Pumping began soon after -- or "dewatering," as the pumping industry calls it. Other city agencies had to rely on outside contractors to pump their tunnels. But it happens that the subway system already had its own toys. Each of the system's under-river tunnels has a sump to deal with everyday seepage, and each also has a tube fixed to the side called a discharge line. Starting Tuesday, the system sent in its "pump trains" -- diesel powered trains with five or six cars, run by just five or six workers. Underneath the trains are pumps, moving hundreds of gallons of water back into the river every minute. "You take the pump train and you bury the first car up to the floor level so it's underwater," Prendergast says, "and you hook it up to the discharge line and you start pumping the tunnel dry." -[NY Mag]

While service to most MTA subway lines, miraculously, has been restored following Hurricane Sandy, there is still no L train service to or in Manhattan which involves a whole lot of commuters (like NY1's Pat Kiernan and at a couple BV staff members). If you're wondering why it hasn't been restored yet, pictures from the MTA's very active Flickr account tell the story: they're still pumping flood waters out of the East River tunnel. Says the MTA:
MTA employees using a pump train are working around the clock to pump seawater out of the L train's tunnel under the East River. The tunnel was flooded during the unprecedented 13-foot storm surge of Hurricane Sandy. This photo shows activity on the afternoon of Monday, November 5.
After the tunnel is pumped dry of water, work will begin to inspect tracks, signals, switches, electrical components, and third rail. If any repairs are needed, employees will make them as quickly as possible to get service restored.

Meanwhile, there is still no G service at all. The tunnels are dry, however, and signal fixes are on their way, says the MTA. In the interim, the MTA is running more B62 buses (which have been crazy packed). More pictures of the work on the L train East River tunnel are below.

Continue reading "Still no L train service (or G for that matter), but MTA is working around the clock (pics)"

(via @yesidid70)

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that the MTA's subway, bus and commuter rail services will be free for today and tomorrow, to encourage the use of mass transit as the region slowly recovers from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy.

The free service began just after midnight Thursday and will last until 11:59 p.m. on Friday, and will allow for free rides on the NYC Subway and Bus network, Long Island Rail Road, and Metro-North Railroad. Free travel will also be available on Access-a-Ride.

"The gridlock we experienced yesterday shows that the New York metropolitan region is in a transportation emergency," Governor Cuomo said. "To get people out of their cars and onto mass transit, I immediately authorized the MTA to suspend transit fares through the end of the work week."

So buses and subways are today (11/1) and Friday (11/2), and all reports on TV show this system currently running smoothly.

Of course, it doesn't do you much good if you live (or need to get to) below 34th St in Manhattan as power is still out. But ConEd has just announced that they hope power in NYC will be restored everywhere by Friday or Saturday.

Some subway lines, like the G and the Q, aren't running at all. Buses, however, are up and running on a mostly regular schedule. A map of the current Subway situation is here and NY1 has details on the myriad MTA service changes.

And LaGuardia airport reopened (the last of the NYC airports to do so after Sandy hit) this morning after being closed since 10/29. Flights began arriving at 7 AM this morning.

Meanwhile a lot of events are still being cancelled. Check out our list of things not happening tonight (11/1).


...there will be a whole slew of musicians singing the same tune in the Big Apple on Friday, as the performers will be covering nothing but new Oasis songs in various locations as a special promotion around the band's not-so-secret NYC show the same night at Terminal 5.

The band's label tells Spinner that one of the Gallagher brothers may even be making a surprise appearance with one of the acts, who are volunteers from MTA's Music Under New York Program... [Spinner]

The non-injured one maybe?