Entries tagged with: RIP

25 result(s) displayed (176 - 200 of 450):

Hal David

Hal David, the Oscar- and Grammy-winning lyricist who in the 1960s and '70s gave pop music vernacular the questions "What's It All About?," "What's New, Pussycat?," "Do You Know the Way to San Jose?" and "What Do You Get When You Fall in Love?," died on Saturday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

The cause was a stroke, according to his wife, Eunice, who said he died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

Mr. David, whose lyrics could be anguished pleas, wistful yearnings, sexy mash notes or wry musings, and sometimes all four in the same song, was best known for the long strand of hits he and the composer Burt Bacharach wrote for Dionne Warwick.

He was something of a late bloomer: he did not have his first Top 10 hit -- "Magic Moments," recorded by Perry Como -- until 1958, when Mr. David was in his late 30s. He achieved his greatest successes well after he turned 40, at a time when many of the other successful songwriters were half his age and many young performers were writing their own songs.

Mr. David's words also found fertile ground on Broadway, in the hit musical "Promises, Promises"; in the movies, in the Oscar-winning song "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" from "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid"; and at weddings via the classic first-dance song "(They Long to Be) Close to You." -[NY Times]

Ninety-One is a good run. R.I.P., Hal. A few Hal David classics are below.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Hal David"

Nintendo Power

Gamers of a certain age likely remember the days when their main fix of information about new and upcoming video games came in the form of the monthly Nintendo Power magazine that was delivered directly to their mailbox. That experience is set to become yet another relic of a past era, as Ars Technica has learned that Future Publishing is planning to stop publishing the magazine....

....Nintendo Power senior editor Chris Hoffman seemed to confirm our source's information on Twitter, saying that he was "sad to see it go" and that the editorial team would "try to make the last issues memorable." Nintendo Power writer Phil Theobald, meanwhile, promised on Twitter that they had "something pretty sweet planned for the final issue." [Further update: It seems the tweets in question have been deleted after publication.] [Ars Technica]

Continue reading "Nintendo Power still exists (but not for long)"

Scott McKenzie

According to a note on Scott McKenzie's website, the singer behind 1967 hit, "San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair)," has passed away. Scott lost his battle with Guillain-Barre Syndrome, which has been ongoing for the last two years. He was 73.

"San Francisco," which was written by The Mamas and the Papas' John Phillips but given to Scott McKenzie to sing, was originally used as a promotional single for the Monterey Pop Festival, but eventually became an anthem for the Summer of Love, the hippie generation, and the entire culture associated with it. Scott, along with John Philips, also co-wrote The Beach Boys' 1988 comeback single, "Kokomo."

Almost half a century later, "San Francisco" song remains impacting for those who were there to experience the late '60s and those who weren't. Your fantastic voice and the powerful song behind it will never be forgotten. RIP Scott.

A video of Scott playing "San Francisco" at Monterey Pop Festival and a stream of the studio version are below.

Continue reading "Scott McKenzie, RIP"

by Fred Pessaro // BGG

Inter Arma
Inter Arma

Inter Arma have signed to Relapse Records. The band is planning a new LP for the label in the new year, and will head out on a string of tour dates that will kick off with their appearance supporting Pallbearer at Knitting Factory on September 11 (tickets). Full tour schedule is listed at the bottom of this post. Inter Arma played our 2010 CMJ showcase alongside another great young band, Royal Thunder (who will also play the Knitting Factory bill).

Barn Burner will head out on a string of dates supporting Gallows that will include a stop at The Studio at Webster Hall on November 3. Tickets are on sale and all other dates are listed at the bottom of this post. The band recently released the new NSFW video for "Scum of the Earth," which you can watch below.

And finally, Akimbo have called it quits. The band has "half of a record completed" but so far no plans to release that material... who will step up to the plate?

All suggested shows for the next two weeks are below along with other listed tour dates and videos. What did I miss?

Continue reading "Evillive (Inter Arma, Barn Burner, Akimbo RIP, more)"

Horshack

Actor Ron Palillo, who played Arnold Horshack on the 1970s television series "Welcome Back, Kotter," died Tuesday at his home in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He was 63.

Jacqueline Stander, an agent for Palillo, told NBC News that the actor had a heart attack and passed away in his sleep.

Palillo starred as Horshack, the goofball of the high school group known as the Sweathogs on the hit series. The show aired from 1975-79 and featured a young John Travolta as Vinny Barbarino. - [NBC]

Damn, that's the second Sweathog this year. ( Robert "Epstein" Hegyes died back in February.) Horshack was a classic Brooklyn character. Rest in peace, Ron.

A couple Horshack-related video clips are below.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Ron Palillo"

David Rakoff

When writer David Rakoff died Thursday at the age 47, he was barely the age he said he was always "meant" to be. In his 2010 memoir, Half Empty, he wrote, "Everyone has an internal age, a time in life when one is, if not one's best, then at very least one's most authentic self. I always felt that my internal clock was calibrated somewhere between 47 and 53 years old."

Rakoff died in New York City after a long struggle with cancer -- an ordeal that he wrote about with sobering honesty and biting wit.

"I can see a great beauty in acknowledging the fact that the world is dark," Rakoff said in a 2010 interview. It's healthy, he insisted, to employ "a certain kind of clear-eyed examination of the world as it is."

Rakoff was born in Montreal, studied East Asian literature and was diagnosed with lymphoma at 22. He recovered, and wrote a fan letter to humorist David Sedaris, which led to frequent contributions to This American Life. In his first essay on This American Life, Rakoff reflects on his role as -- oddly enough -- Sigmund Freud in the Christmas display of an upscale department store.

"In the window I fantasized about starting an entire Christmas Freud movement: Freuds everywhere, providing grown-ups and children with the greatest gift of all: Insight."

In May, Rakoff and some other This American Life contributors appeared onstage before a live audience in New York City. By then, a recent surgery to remove a tumor had severed nerves in his left arm, leaving him unable to feel or move that limb. He spoke wistfully about the pleasure he once took in the rigorous study of modern dance:

"You become this altered humming -- dare I say beautiful -- working instrument of placement and form and concentration," he said. "But like I said, that's a long time ago and a version of myself that has long since ceased to exist. Before I became such an observer ..." His voice trailed off and he was not able finish. He just stood there on the stage. But then, he did something wonderful: He danced. Gracefully, always gracefully. [NPR]

Rest in Peace David.

Some videos starring David are below.

Continue reading "David Rakoff, RIP"

Carl Davis (left) with The Chi-Lites
Carl Davis

The iconic music producer who shaped what became known as "the Chicago Sound" died Thursday at his home in Summerville, S.C. He was 77 years old. Mr. Davis had been suffering from lung disease. Mr. Davis and wife Dedra Davis relocated from Chicago to South Carolina in 2009.

Mr. Davis was one of the first African-American A&R directors and produced numerous hit songs for the Columbia Records subsidiary Okeh Records.

He was to Chicago soul music what the Chess brothers were to blues. - [Chicago Sun-Times]

Carl Davis left behind a legacy that included producing hits by Gene Chandler, Major Lance, Jackie Wilson, The Chi-Lites, Barbara Acklin and many more. RIP Carl Davis, but thanks for making the music happen.

Marvin Hamlisch

Marvin Hamlisch, the singularly productive and sensationally decorated composer of musicals like "A Chorus Line" and songs like "The Way We Were," has died, The Associated Press reported. A family spokesman told The A.P. that Mr. Hamlisch died in Los Angeles on Monday after a brief illness but did not provide additional details. Mr. Hamlisch was 68.

In a career that spanned film, television, theater and recorded music, Mr. Hamlisch won seemingly every award available in each medium. He was a 12-time Academy Award nominee, for his score and song contributions to films like "The Spy Who Loved Me" and "Sophie's Choice," and a three-time Oscar winner for the score of "The Sting" as well as its song "The Way We Were" (with lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman). He won four Emmy Awards and four Grammy Awards, as well as a Tony Award for his score to the musical "A Chorus Line." That musical, which blended bouncy, brassy songs like "One" and "Dance: Ten; Looks: Three" with melancholy numbers like "At the Ballet," also won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1976. - [NY Times]

RIP, Marv. Even though the kids thought you were square, your music helped define a decade. Some video clips are below.

Continue reading "Marvin Hamlisch R.I.P."

Jason Noble

I was not planning on blogging while on vacation here in Saratoga. But news arrived this weekend of the death of guitarist/bassist Jason Noble, and I felt he deserved at least a few words.

Jason was the founder of the post-rock band called Rachel's. In fact, initially, he WAS Rachel's. And back in the mid-90s, there was no such thing as "post-rock," but along with Tortoise (in Chicago), Rachel's was one of the trailblazers of an instrumental style that melded rock and classical sounds. If you're a fan of bands like Godspeed! You Black Emperor, or Mogwai, then you're hearing the long-lasting echoes of Jason's work. - [WNYC Soundcheck]

Rodan/Rachel's/Shipping News member Jason Noble lost his three-year battle with cancer on Saturday (8/4). He was 41. R.I.P. Jason.

You can stream select works from Jason's career below via Spotify.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Jason Noble (Rodan / Rachel's / Shipping News)"

Bill Doss in Austin (more by Tim Griffin)
Bill Doss

"Nuçi's Space is a non-profit health and music resource center in Athens, GA. The aim of the organization is to prevent suicide by providing obstacle free treatment for musicians suffering from depression and other such disorders as well as to assist in the emotional, physical and professional well-being of musicians."
The cause of Bill Doss's untimely death has not been revealed, but "In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you make donations to Nuci's Space, a local musician support & resource center." That said, Athens-Clarke County coroner Sonny Wilson told an Athens paper that "No evidence of foul play or suicide is evident and Doss had no history of medical problems, Wilson said."

The note, via the band's publicist, also reads: "We ask that you please respect the privacy of the Elephant 6 family at this time. Our hearts are with them, and we will release any further details and statements as it's fit in the days to come."

A memorial is set for this Saturday, August 4 (2PM-4PM) at The Fabulous 40 Watt Club in Athens, GA.

Continue reading "Bill Doss memorial set; Musician Support organization donations being accepted"

by Andrew Sacher

Tony Sly

it's been a while since I've dusted off my copy of No Use for a Name's ¡Leche con Carne!, but it was one of the more impressionable albums on me in my music taste forming days, which began with a whole lot of '90s pop punk. And when their video for "Soulmate" from that album (which you can watch below) appeared on Hopeless Records' video compilation Cinema Beer Goggles (along with NOFX, Vandals, Circle Jerks, Blink-182, etc) I must have watched it enough times to recite it's storyline.

We're now saddened to receive news from No Use for a Name's label Fat Wreck Chords, that the band's frontman Tony Sly, who also had a solo career and has recorded with Lagwagon frontman Joey Cape, has passed away. He was 41 years old. Fat's website reads:

It is with great sorrow that we must say goodbye to Tony Sly of No Use For A Name. We received a call earlier today of his passing, and are devastated. We have lost an incredible talent, friend, and father - one of the true greats. Fat Mike had this to say: "One of my dearest friends and favorite song writers has gone way too soon. Tony, you will be greatly missed."
RIP Tony. You'll be missed and always remembered through your music. The video for "Soulmate" is below.

Continue reading "Tony Sly, RIP"

Bill Doss (Olivia Tremor Control) @ P4K Fest 2012 (more by Fred Pessaro)
bill Doss
Bill Doss

We really hope this news, from Athens, Georgia's Flagpole Magazine music editor Gabe Vodicka turns out to be false. UPDATE: Chunklet and others confirm. UPDATE 2: Olivia Tremor Control writes, "We are devastated by the loss of our brother Bill Doss. We are at a loss for words." Rest in Peace Bill.

As Wikipedia points out, "Bill Doss (born September 12, 1971) is among the co-founders of The Elephant 6 Recording Company, based in Athens, Georgia, and one of the key creative forces behind The Olivia Tremor Control, one of the leaders of the collective, and later, following the band's break-up, The Sunshine Fix." Olivia Tremor Control played the Pitchfork Music Festival earlier this month. The reunited band played a show at Music Hall of Williamsburg in June.

Bob Babbitt

DETROIT (AP) -- Prominent Motown studio musician and Funk Brothers member Bob Babbitt, whose bass playing pounded through the Temptations hit "Ball of Confusion" and Marvin Gaye's "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)," has died. He was 74.

Babbitt died Monday of complications from brain cancer in Nashville, Tenn., where he had lived for many years, his manager David Spero said in a statement released by Universal Music, the label in which Babbitt contributed to numerous hit records.

Well-known for decades among musicians, Babbitt laid down bass lines on Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed, Delivered," along with "The Tears of a Clown" by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, "Inner City Blues" by Marvin Gaye, and Edwin Starr's "War."

"Bob was a teddy bear of a guy," former Motown engineer Ed Wolfrum told the Detroit Free Press. "And he was an extraordinary musician -- a player's player."

After leaving Motown, he recorded with Bette Midler, Jim Croce, Bonnie Raitt and Frank Sinatra.
In all, he played on more than 200 top 40 hits, including "Midnight Train to Georgia," by Gladys Knight and the Pips and "Ready to Take a Chance Again" by Barry Manilow.

Babbitt gained wider public recognition through the 2002 film about the Funk Brothers, "Standing in the Shadows of Motown."

"He was one of the last of the breed of journeymen bass players who were total pros, could go in and crank out a hit, go to the next session and crank out another one," Allan Slutsky, the film's writer and producer, told The Detroit News. [AP]

Dude was a legend and played on so many incredible records it's mind boggling (and hip-shaking). Rest in peace, Bob. A few videos are below.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Funk Brothers bassist Bob Babbitt"

Kitty Wells

Kitty Wells, the often proclaimed "Queen of Country Music" died Monday from complications after a stroke. She was 92.

Wells, born Ellen Muriel Deason, became the first female singer to reach No. 1 in the country music charts with her 1952 song It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels, and she spent much of the next two decades as one of the most well-known names in country.

In 1976, Wells was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, and her other accolades include the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, Governor's Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Recording Industry and induction into the Grammy Hall of Fame. [WSMV]

First Jon Lord, now Queen of Country Kitty Wells, whose many country hits included "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels," "Making Believe," "Searching (for Someone Like You)" and "Amigo's Guitar," all of which are streamable below. Rest in peace, Kitty.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Kitty Wells"

Jon Lord

Born in Leicester, Lord learned classical piano at an early age before being seduced by watching early rock 'n' roll star Jerry Lee Lewis and jazz organist Jimmy Smith.

He could have chosen a career as an actor after receiving a drama school scholarship, but started playing in pub bands including short-lived outfits with future Rolling Stones star Ronnie Wood and his brother Art.

He also worked as a session musician and is thought to have played piano on The Kinks' hit You Really Got Me.

After meeting guitarist Ritchie Blackmore through another project, the first incarnation of Deep Purple was born.

Lord's classical influence surfaced when Lord composed Concerto for Group and Orchestra, which the band performed with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall in 1969.

But the group refined their heavy rock sound and found mass success at the start of the 1970s with albums including Deep Purple in Rock and Machine Head.

In their classic years, the band also included Blackmore, singer Ian Gillan, drummer Ian Paice and bassist Roger Glover.

Lord continued to compose classical works alongside the group's output and, when they split in 1976, he joined other groups Whitesnake and Paice, Ashton and Lord. [BBC]

R.I.P. Deep Purple founding member and keyboardist Jon Lord, who lost his battle with pancreatic cancer today (7/16) at age 71. Lord's Hammond organ stylings were intrinsic to Deep Purple's sound, but were influential beyond the hard rock/heavy metal world (The Charlatans' hit "The Only One I Know" was almost a rewrite of Deep Purple's "Hush"). He also co wrote many of the band's best-known songs, including "Smoke on the Water," "Strange Kind of Woman," and "Black Night." Jon, here's hoping you have access to a perfectly maintained Leslie cabinet wherever you are now.

A few Deep Purple classics via YouTube are below.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Jon Lord"

The Frogs, Dennis on the left

WIND LAKE -- Rescue crews recovered the body of Dennis Flemion Tuesday, July 10th. Flemion did not resurface after jumping from a pontoon boat in Wind Lake on Saturday, July 7th.

Divers recovered Flemion's body in water about 42 feet deep.

Authorities say 57-year-old Flemion was at Wind Lake for a family gathering on July 7th when he jumped off a pontoon boat and into the lake without a life-jacket on.

Authorities say Flemion was a good swimmer and knew the lake well. [6NewsNow]

R.I.P. Dennis. The Frogs were one of the strangest bands of the late '80s and '90s and anyone who saw them live will never forget it. (Check out a clip of Andy Richter describing a Frogs' show on Conan O'Brien from 1997 below.) Gerard Cosloy of Matador Records, who released their 1996's My Daughter the Broad, posted some recollections on Matablog:
While I'd hate to put too much focus on just one part of the Frogs oeuvre, the initial 'Made Up Songs' cassettes (the first couple of which constituted the bulk of 'It's Only Right & Natural' as well as the subsequent Matador LP, 'My Daughter The Broad') were probably played in my home, car, head, as much as any music recorded before or since. There was certainly a stretch of my life in the late 1980′s in which you were not leaving my apartment if you hadn't heard "I've Done Drugs (Out Of The Mist)" at least once. I suspect there's others who have similar stories. There are few "what the fuck was that?" moments in music that quite compare to someone's reaction the first time you play them The Frogs.

Dennis was without question, one of the funniest persons I've ever encountered. Painfully so. It would not be an exaggeration to say there were several times in which his verbal evisceration chops were almost impossible to keep up with (those who've attended Frogs shows over the years know exactly what I'm talking about).

There's a couple of new Frogs albums that came out last week on iTunes ; 'Squirrel Bunny Juniper Deluxe' and 'Count Yer Blessingz'. The Dennis that we saw onstage would've recognized this tragic event as a huge opportunity to plug some new recordings. Sans wig, drum sticks, etc. he might've preferred I'd not even mention it. The fantastic output and fleeting moments of near-fame aside, I hope he's remembered as a really sweet guy first, and a hugely talented artist second. Our thoughts go out to Jimmy, the rest of the Flemion family, their friends and everyone who was lucky enough to know Dennis. Simply saying, "he'll be missed" doesn't come close to covering it.

You can stream the 'Made Up Songs' cassettes via Spotify widgets below.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Dennis Flemion of The Frogs"

Any Griffith
Any GriffithAny Griffith
Any Griffith

Griffith died this morning.

Former UNC President Bill Friday says The Andy Griffith Show and Matlock actor died at his home in Dare County, North Carolina around 7 a.m.

Friday, who is a close friend of the actor, confirmed the news to WITN News.

Emergency medical crews responded to Griffith's home this morning, Dare County Sheriff J.D. Doughtie told WAVY.com.

Griffith, who was born in Mt. Airy, N.C., was launched to fame as Sheriff Andy Taylor in The Andy Griffith Show for the CBS from 1960-1968. On the show, Ron Howard played his son, Opie. He starred on other shows and in films, but found his greatest success again with legal drama Matlock, from 1986 to 1995. He played the title character, Ben Matlock.

In 2000, Griffith underwent quadruple heart-bypass surgery and in 2007 had hip surgery after a fall. [USA Today]

Rest in Peace Andy.

Continue reading "Andy Griffith, RIP"

Bird's eye view of the scene
Stage Collapse in Toronto

Rest in peace to Drum Tech Scott Johnson of South Yorkshire in the UK, who passed away at the age of 33 due to injuries sutained at the recent stage collapse in Toronto.

A relative confirmed the death of Mr Johnson, from Doncaster, who worked for other British bands, including Keane.

Police in Toronto said the stage was being set up on Saturday when the top part of it collapsed on top of him.

The Foreign Office confirmed that Mr Johnson's family had been notified.

Three other people were injured, one seriously, in the incident at Downsview Park, medical officials said.

The band, from Oxfordshire, south-east England, were not on stage at the time and the sell-out concert was cancelled. A message on the band's website said the gig had been cancelled due to "unforeseen circumstances". -[BBC]

Our hearts go out to Johnson's family.

Tim Mooney

I knew Tim Mooney for over 20 years. As many Red House Painters' fans may know, American Music Club was very helpful in giving us our start. Later on, Tim played drums on my first solo album, Rock'n' Roll Singer, and then on Sun Kil Moon's Ghosts Of The Great Highway. We shared many long days and hours together. Tim was a peaceful, patient, and incredibly talented person. The last time I saw Tim was in 2009, in Petaluma, he was having ice cream with his daughter. He was as happy and content as ever... I've been overwhelmed with memories of Tim since learning of the news yesterday [June 14th]. My heart goes out to his family, his many friends, and to the members of AMC. -[Mark Kozelek]
Rest in Peace to Tim Mooney, member of Sun Kil Moon, Sleepers, American Music Club, Negative Trend and others. If you'd like to donate to the Tim Mooney fund, you can do so via Paypal or you can mail a check directly. Details on the address to send a check, as well as some videos are below. Tim Mooney, you will be missed.

Continue reading "Tim Mooney (American Music Club, Sun Kil Moon), R.I.P."

Bob Welch

Nashville police are reporting that Bob Welch, former Fleetwood Mac guitarist and solo artist, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was 65. Welch was in Fleetwood Mac from 1971 to 1974 and his exit made way for Lindsey Buckingham, shepherding in the band's hitmaking era.

But Welch went on to be a successful solo artist, scoring big hits with soft rock staples "Sentimental Lady" and "Ebony Eyes" in 1978. RIP, Bob.

Videos for both those hits are below.

Continue reading "Bob Welch R.I.P."

George Marino

George Marino, an engineer who mastered such classic albums as Stevie Wonder's Innervisions, John Lennon & Yoko Ono's Double Fantasy and Guns N' Roses' Appetite for Destruction, died Monday after a yearlong bout with lung cancer. His age was not immediately available.

A three-time Grammy winner, Marino joined Sterling Sound in 1973 and worked at the New York mastering facility ever since.

"Sterling Sound and the music industry as a whole has suffered a tremendous loss," the company said in a statement. "Words cannot express the sorrow we feel. George was family to us all, and we will miss him dearly."

Marino mastered an untold number of albums - AC/DC's Highway to Hell, Bon Jovi's Slippery When Wet, Metallica's 1991 eponymous release, Coldplay's A Rush of Blood to the Head, Whitney Houston's Whitney and Arcade Fire's The Suburbs, which won the 2011 Grammy for album of the year, were among the highlights. He also mastered some of the annual Grammy nominee CDs for the Recording Academy. [Billboard]

RIP George Marino. Check out some videos of tracks from those albums he mastered below...

Continue reading "George Marino, RIP"

Pete Cosey

This morning, according to the private Facebook page of fellow guitarist and collaborator Vernon Reid, Chicago's own Pete Cosey died at 68... [Pete Cosey] was a classic musician's musician; he's not especially well-known, though he played on tons of classic records... Cosey was a key session musician at Chess Records in the 60s, appearing on sides by Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, the Rotary Connection, and Etta James, and he worked with the great Phil Cohran in the latter's Artistic Heritage Ensemble. He's probably most famous, though (to the extent that he's famous at all), for his mind-melting work with Miles Davis in the early 70s: he played on the trumpeter's heaviest, most electric albums, including Agharta, Pangaea, and Get Up With It. After Davis broke up the band in 1975 and went into semi-retirement, Cosey was never able to build the solo career he so richly deserved. He used his guitar like an abstract expressionist painter, creating thick, richly textured solos with fierce rhythmic power, dazzling colors, and nonchalant violence. He continued to appear on records here and there, including Herbie Hancock's Future Shock and an album with Japanese saxophonist Akira Sakata, but he always seemed to be planning his own next project, which never quite materialized. -[Chicago Reader]
R.I.P. to guitarist Pete Cosey. Check out a few videos of him playing live with the great Miles Davis below.

Continue reading "R.I.P. Pete Cosey"

docwatson

Doc Watson, the guitarist and folk singer whose flat-picking style elevated the acoustic guitar to solo status in bluegrass and country music, and whose interpretations of traditional American music profoundly influenced generations of folk and rock guitarists, died on Tuesday in Winston-Salem, N.C. He was 89.

Mr. Watson, who had been blind since he was a baby, died in a hospital after recently undergoing abdominal surgery, The Associated Press quoted a hospital spokesman as saying. On Thursday his daughter, Nancy Ellen Watson, said he had been hospitalized after falling at his home in Deep Gap, N.C., adding that he did not break any bones but was very ill. [NY Times]

Folk legend Doc Watson, influential guitarist and a figurehead of the 1960s folk revival, passed away yesterday (5/29) at the age of 89. RIP Doc, your influence and legacy will always be remembered.

Check out some videos of Doc Watson below...

Continue reading "Doc Watson, RIP"

The Bee-Gees (Robin Gibb left)
Robin Gibb

Robin Gibb, one of three brothers who made up the disco group the Bee Gees behind "Saturday Night Fever" and other now-iconic sounds from the 1970s, died on Sunday, according to a statement on his website.

He was 62.

Gibb "passed away today following his long battle with cancer and intestinal surgery," said the statement, which was attributed to his family. He died in England at 10:47 a.m. (5:47 a.m. ET), according to a post on his official Twitter feed. [CNN]

Robin Gibb and Donna Summer days apart. It's a sad week and a sad week for disco. Fuck cancer. RIP Robin. Check out some videos below...

Continue reading "Robin Gibb, RIP "

Donna Summer

Donna Summer (born LaDonna Adrian Gaines) was an American singer/songwriter who gained prominence during the disco era of the 1970s. She has a mezzo-soprano vocal range, and is a five-time Grammy Award winner. Summer was the first artist to have three consecutive double albums reach number one on the US Billboard chart, and she also charted four number-one singles in the United States within a thirteen-month period. -[Wiki]
Donna Summer lost her long battle with cancer this morning, according to TMZ. She was 63 years old and is survived by her husband, three daughters, and four grandchildren.

Donna Summer's megahits included songs like "Love to Love You Baby," "Bad Girls,","Hot Stuff," "She Works Hard For The Money," and "Last Dance," many of which she recorded with legendary Italian producer Giorgio Moroder. Her singles still get tons of play today whether on dancefloors or at weddings around the world. Its a true testament to the timelessness of her work.

Donna Summers's last US tour was in 2008 to celebrate Crayons, her first set of new and original material since 1991.

RIP to an icon of disco and soul music. It's been a rough couple weeks for music. A few videos of Donna Summer's classic songs are below.

Continue reading "Donna Summer, RIP"