Entries tagged with: Terry Gilliam

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Flying Lotus at LPR in October (more by Amanda Hatfield)
Flying Lotus

Flying Lotus, whose great Until the Quiet Comes has been getting the credit it deserves on year-end lists by NME, Uncut, NPR, and Pitchfork, just made a list of his top ten films that have Criterion Collection editions. The whole list with commentary is on Criterion's website but you can see his picks below.

In related news, Flying Lotus' rap alter-ego Captain Murphy recently tweeted that he'll be in Austin this March for SXSW 2013. This announcement comes after SXSW's own recent announcement of artists which included Rhye, Savages, Flatbush Zombies, Deap Vally, Angel Haze, and more.

Flying Lotus' list below...

Continue reading "Flying Lotus lists his top 10 Criterion Collection DVDs; Captain Murphy playing SXSW 2013"

words by Andrew Frisicano, some photos by Jonathan Bayer & Yvonne Rodriguez

"Once you've reached Madison Square Garden, you've reached the peak. You're the success story of the day, so one relaxes. There's no where to go, there's no higher, there's only the abyss waiting. So live free, for one night only." -Terry Gilliam on the Unstaged Pre-show video q

a win Win situation (by Jonathan Bayer)
Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire looked perfectly at home on the stage of Madison Square Garden Thursday night, the second show in their two-night run. At this one, the audience exceeded the nearly-full stadium, with an at-home crowd watching a live stream directed by Terry Gilliam broadcast over YouTube (the live channel has something like 600,000 views currently, though not sure that number means anything).

That bodes well for the band, who are still waiting on the first-week sales numbers for their possible #1, The Suburbs, which came out on Tuesday (and has been on sale digitally for $3.99 at Amazon). At the show, the new record's songs weren't totally unfamiliar. One, "The Sprawl II," even made the encore, and spurred a roar of recognition from the girls in front of me, who informed our cozy section of the song's title (with a peace sign for the two) and described its arc (slow at first, but then really awesome) as it started up. A faulty drum machine forced the band to restart the tune a minute in, allowing a reflective pause for the victory lap in progress.

The band was clearly reveling in the moments of the show. Win Butler sailed into the crowd multiple times, occasionally with his guitar still attached. In one impressive maneuver, the frontman walked along the seated section's railing like a balance beam, before jumping into the general admission pit, tangles of mic cord trailing behind him (a play from the Matt Berninger handbook). The band frequently rotated instruments, with pianos, keys, two drums kits, violins and an array of percussion all playing a part.

The second night's songs were close but not identical to night one's (and both differed from their Boston show a few nights ago). As before, their debut LP, Funeral, provided ripe stadium-level material for the set, filling a little less than half of it. The order changed, but only one new song was swapped outright: "Empty Room" replacing "Half Light II."

For me, the stadium aspect of MSG was kind of a strange novelty. From the distant seats, the experience of watching a band while reclining, huge soda and personal pizza/popcorn/whatever in hand, is in some ways closer to a YouTube stream than a crowded, sweaty live concert. Still, the in-person event had its rewards for those that weren't up front - the band's backdrop for the evening depicted an abandoned bridge overpass, with an rectangular block of lights similar to a football stadium. In front of that was a video screen, mostly likely meant to be a billboard, which projected forms and images for each song. Antiquated ghosts lit up "No Cars Go" and what I can only hope is the video for "The Suburbs" depicted a gang of kids riding bikes in Reservoir Dogs-style slo-mo through an eerie neighborhood development.

And the people: a view-obstructing beer vendor trolling the aisles, a group of teens trying to find someone to buy them beer, an energetic (chemically-enhanced?) man pirouetting around the stadium's perimeter, and thousands of fists raised in unison for the group rite of "Wake Up" (the latter being inspiring or frightening, depending).

and there was confetti...
Arcade Fire

Owen Pallett started out the night to a minimally filled stadium. "I'm so happy to be playing here for the 200 of you," he joked. Then responding to a heckler, "No, I'm not taking it off, I just got this. Sorry." The empty hall added a nice element of reverb for the people who were there, amplifying the work of Owen's orchestra-in-a-box loop pedal.

Similarly, Spoon sounded great, with help from a horn section and drums borrowed from Phil Collins (both on only a few songs). The band jammed through a taut set with favorites like "Jonathan Fisk" and "I Summon You" taking their place along the new Transference batch. For "No One Gets Me But You," the Roots' Owen Biddle joined to make a two-piece bass section (as he did on Fallon).

Some videos from the show's "Unstaged" live stream are already online. Fan videos too (including a nice close-up of Win in the crowd). The set list, some more picturs from night two (night one are HERE), and those videos are below...

Continue reading "Arcade Fire played MSG again (night 2 setlist, videos, pics) "

Imaginarium

NY TIMES: Are you a big indie-rock guy?

TERRY: No! I mean, most of it's [bad]. I just happen to like Arcade Fire. The world of indie is such a funny thing now. I think everybody's in it. Otherwise you're just the dependent rock world. I think half the indie bands are owned by some big company. So it's a complete lie. I don't know why Canada produces some rather interesting work. Arcade Fire, Sunset Rubdown, Wolf Parade -- these are my favorites....

...NY TIMES: How do you film something like [an Arcade Fire show at Madison Square Garden], that's so elaborate, and has all these potential interpretations?

TERRY: These shows, there's a machine, in a sense, that runs them. I've never done multicamera work, so I'm just advising people: Look at the video work they've got up on the screen; it's raw and it's overexposed, and almost the antithesis of what I do when I make a film. So let's use that, and basically throw away the slick stuff that's normally done at, say, a Britney Spears concert. Let's just be true to what the band wants to do.

Stream tonight's show at YouTube ("Global live streaming on YouTube/VEVO of Arcade Fire's Madison Square Garden show in New York - Aug 5th, 2010 @ 10PM ET / 7PM PT").

In related news, Spike Jonze's Arcade Fire Collaboration is a Sci-Fi B-Movie Short Film.

one of eight covers...
Arcade Fire

"Last year's war of words between the Flaming Lips' Wayne Coyne and Arcade Fire front man Win Butler was, at the time, an enjoyable diversion. Although Coyne's comments (about what he perceived as arrogance in Butler's crew) seemed somewhat impolite and petty, the flare-up between the two acts injected some energy and fun into a modern rock scene that is too often stuffy and image-conscious. Butler responded, Coyne apologized then retracted his apology, and finally the whole affair died down. Both bands continued to sell records and make money.

Recently, I received Arcade Fire's latest album The Suburbs and listened closely and repeatedly to its hour of malaise. Suddenly, the conflict between Coyne and Butler didn't seem so inconsequential, but rather relevant and perfectly understandable. Coyne is an eternally youthful figure fronting a band that, decades into its career, all but demands participation, energy and joy from listeners and fans. Butler is an intense, brooding 30-year-old who received unparalleled acclaim right out of the gate, but for some reason seems increasingly remote and filled with angst. If Coyne experienced first-hand even a small dose of the dissatisfaction that permeates The Suburbs, then it stands to reason that he found the attitude off-putting. The two worldviews have very little in common." [PopMatters]

NPR is streaming "The Suburbs" in full.

Arcade Fire's current tour had them at the Osheaga Festival in Montreal on Saturday and at Bank of America Pavillion in Boston last night. Tonight (8/2) they play the Mann Center in Philly. Then August 4th and 5th are the two giant shows at Madison Square Garden, both with Owen Pallett and Spoon, the second of which will be streamed on YouTube...

Terry Gilliam will direct the live webcast of Arcade Fire's concert at New York City's Madison Square Garden.

The Arcade Fire show kicks off Unstaged, a new online concert series being launched by American Express and streamed on YouTube. The Montreal-based band will live stream their Aug. 5 concert at 10 p.m. ET, the second of two shows at MSG.

Gilliam, whose films include Brazil and 12 Monkeys, last released The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus in December.

The concert will stream on the Google Inc.-owned YouTube via Vevo, the music video site owned by Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment and Abu Dhabi Media Co.

It's the first in a planned series of five live streamed concerts, with John Legend and the Roots to follow. Others will be announced later. [USA Today]

American Express also sponsored the National show that was streamed online and directed by D. A. Pennebaker. AmEx also sponsored the 5-SPIN25 shows that were streamed online too.

The Arcade Fire stream happens HERE. But why watch the stream when you can experience it live for free? I have two pairs of tickets to giveaway to that 8/5 show (you can also still buy them). Contest details, with the stream trailer, below...

Continue reading "Arcade Fire's new album streaming @ NPR, MSG shows this week - win tickets or watch the Terry Gilliam-directed stream"

by Klaus Kinski

Monty PythonHow do you get some of the Tri-State area's biggest nerds to yell "Holy shit!", drop their Xbox 360 controllers and head for the door at record speeds? Tell them that IFC and BAFTA are reuniting the entire MONTY PYTHON troupe for one night only in NYC in celebration of their outstanding contributions to television and film. On October 15th, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin, and even the late Graham Chapman will be at the Ziegfeld Theater in NYC to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the creation of comedy troupe Monty Python. The reunion event includes a screening of the theatrical version of the new IFC original documentary Monty Python: Almost the Truth (The Lawyer's Cut), a Q&A with the cast, as well as a special BAFTA Award presentation.

Right now ticket info for this event is scarce but word on the street is that SOME tickets will be available at www.ifc.com in mid-September.

The version of Monty Python: Almost the Truth (The Lawyer's Cut) that will be shown at this preposterously awesome event is actually a condensed version of the larger 6-hour Monty Python documentary of the same name that will be shown in 1-hour installments on IFC from October 18 - October 23 at 9:00pm ET. It is part of IFC's Python-a-thon, a week long Monty Python celebration that also includes showings of Python film classics Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Monty Python's Life of Brian, and Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl. The episode guide for this 6-part series is below.

Continue reading "Monty Python troupe reuniting in NYC (@ Ziegfeld, on IFC) "