Entries tagged with: laws

8 result(s) displayed (1 - 8 of 8):

Cats

This happened Monday:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today signed a bill to increase protections for pets across New York State. The bill prohibits the unnecessary piercing and tattooing of cats, dogs, and all other pets for purely cosmetic purposes for the pleasure of the owner, except under limited circumstances. Those who violate the law will be subject to criminal penalties.

"This is animal abuse, pure and simple," Governor Cuomo said. "I'm proud to sign this common sense legislation and end these cruel and unacceptable practices in New York once and for all."

The bill (A.739-D/S.6769-C) prohibits the piercing or tattooing of all pets, including cats and dogs, to protect the animals from unnecessary harm. The bill allows the use of piercing and tattooing in only limited circumstances, such as ear tags on rabbits, tattoos for identification purposes only, or where the piercing provides a medical benefit to the animal and is performed by or under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

A violation of the law is punishable by imprisonment for a period not to exceed 15 days and/or a fine not to exceed $250. The law will take effect in 120 days.

Senator Tom Libous, sponsor of the bill, said, "Subjecting animals to body piercing or tattooing is unconscionable and cruel. Animals can't speak out against undergoing a painful procedure like piercing or tattooing - I'm glad we're standing up for them and banning this heartless practice."

Assemblymember Linda B. Rosenthal, sponsor of the bill, said, "While people can decide whether they would like to undergo the pain associated with a tattoo or piercing, animals do not have that luxury. Subjecting animals to painful cosmetic procedures, such as tattooing and piercing, merely to satisfy an individual's misguided and selfish aesthetic predilections, is inhumane and should be considered cruelty by the law. I am pleased that the Governor signed my bill into law; doing so sends a strong message that this kind of behavior constitutes animal abuse and that it will not be tolerated."

It is still legal however, to have your cats tattooed on you.

Shamir's dance-friendly set at Muchmore's during Northside (@brooklynvegan)
CMJ Flyer

Enacted in 1926, ​the New York City's ​cabaret laws were originally to put the kibosh on illegal booze. After the repeal of prohibition, the law -- which requires clubs and bars to get an expensive permit for dancing -- went largely unenforced until the Giuliani administration and his efforts to clean up the city. Williamsburg club/coffee shop/venue Muchmore's is taking a stand against cabaret laws, suing the city:

Andrew Muchmore​, owner of ​Muchmore's Cafe ​in Williamsburg, filed suit in Brooklyn federal court to challenge New York's ​cabaret laws ​- which prohibit danci​​ng ​by more than three people at one time unless the venue has a cabaret license.

In the suit, he cites the first and 14th amendments and claims the tight restrictions against patrons shaking their money makers have forced him to play ​sedate if not ​dreary tunes at his nightspot​ and coffeehouse.

The real estate attorney argues the stricture prevents him from cranking beats that might actually tempt patrons to ​want to dance ​- and thus break the law, according to his s​​uit.

To avoid any potential skirmish with code enforcement officers, Muchmore avoids hosting acts that "involve dancing or would tend to elicit dancing," the suit states.

Instead, Muchmore plays ​safe ​wallflower genres including "folk music, rock music, experimental electronic music, jazz and other forms of music that are not conducive to dancing," the suit states. - [NY Post]

!!!'s 2003 dancepunk touchstone "Me and Giuliani Down by the School Yard (A True Story)" confronted cabaret laws and NYC powers-that-be in its own funky way. Stream it below...

Continue reading "Williamsburg venue Muchmore's suing New York City, saying cabaret laws are unconstitutional"

busted

4/20 was Sunday and now comes more good news for marijuana smokers in one of NYC's five boroughs: The NY Post reports that Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson issued a memo to the NYPD that his office will no long­er prosecute people caught with small amounts of pot, or caught smoking it in public:

In a move that directly bucks the Police Department's own policy and that of other DAs in the city, Brooklyn prosecutors will be directing cops to free the defendants, seal their cases and destroy their fingerprint file, according to a memo sent the NYPD and obtained by The Post.

"The goal of this new policy is to ensure that the resources of this office are allocated in a manner that most enhances public safety, and individuals, especially young people of color, do not become unfairly burdened and stigmatized by involvement in the criminal-justice system...

...Even when the defendant is issued a [desk-appearance ticket] (sparing him or her the daunting holding-cell experience), that defendant still must make sure that he or she appears in court on the DAT arraignment date -- a trip to the courthouse and a wait in the courtroom that may eat up most of a day,'' the memo says. - [NY Post]

This applies to defendants with clean (or mostly clean) criminal records and no outstanding warrants, and if the charge is a Class B misdemeanor pot possession (aka less than 25 grams of weed).

20-year-old Chance the Rapper will not be able to buy his cigarettes when he visits NYC
Chance

Heads up to the young smokers in NYC: buying cigarettes is about to get (theoretically) harder, at least until you're 21. The New York Times reports:

The legal age for buying tobacco, including cigarettes, electronic cigarettes, cigars and cigarillos will rise to 21, from 18, under a bill adopted by the City Council and which Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has said he would sign. The new minimum age will take effect six months after signing.

The proposal provoked some protest among people who pointed out that New Yorkers under 21 can drive, vote and fight in wars, and should be considered mature enough to decide whether to buy cigarettes. But the Bloomberg administration's argument -- that raising the age to buy cigarettes would discourage people from becoming addicted in the first place -- won the day.

"This is literally legislation that will save lives," Christine C. Quinn, the Council speaker, said shortly before the bill passed 35 to 10.

...

The new law is a capstone to more than a decade of efforts by Mr. Bloomberg, like banning smoking in most public places, that have given the city some of the toughest antismoking policies in the world.

In one concession to the cigarette industry, the administration dropped a proposal that would force retailers to keep cigarettes out of sight. City officials said they were doing it because they had not resolved how to deal with the new phenomenon of electronic cigarettes, but others worried that if the tobacco industry lodged a First Amendment challenge to the so-called display ban, it could have derailed the entire package.

The smoking age is 18 in most of the country, but some states have made it 19. Some counties have also adopted 19, including Nassau and Suffolk on Long Island. Needham, Mass., a suburb of Boston, raised the smoking age to 21 in 2005.

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Continue reading "NYC raising cigarette-purchasing age to 21"

Pandora
Pandora

This letter, signed by a ton of artists and pictured above, is set to appear in an ad in Billboard:

We are big fans of Pandora. That's why we helped give the company a discount on rates for the past decade.

Pandora is now enjoying phenomenal success as a Wall Street company. Skyrocketing growth in revenues and users. We celebrate that. At the same time, the music community is just now beginning to gain its footing in the new digital world.

Pandora's principal asset is the music.

Why is the company asking Congress once again to step in and gut the royalties that thousands of musicians rely upon? That's not fair, and that's not how partners work together.
Congress has many pressing issues to consider, but this is not one of them. Let's work this out as partners and continue to bring fans the great musical experience they rightly expect.

Pink Floyd, Down, Primus, Dead Kennedys (with our without Jello?), Nas, Alabama, Sheryl Crow and many more big major label names signed this (or someone signed it on their behalf). Check out the full list below, and head to fairpayforartists.com for more information on their point of view..

The issue is that Pandora is supporting the Internet Radio Fairness Act which they say will "help end the long-standing discrimination against internet radio". Artists are mad because that possibly means less money for them, but Pandora and other Internet radio providers argue they can't stay in business the way things are now.

Continue reading "A bunch of artists wrote an open letter to Pandora who support the Internet Radio Fairness Act"

decibels

The Seaside Concert Series is expected to get the green light as Mayor Michael Bloomberg is set to sign off on legislation today that will save the Coney Island concerts.

The shows were placed on hold after nearby synagogues complained that the noise would disrupt their congregations.

The Sea Breeze Jewish Center and Temple Beth Abraham filed a lawsuit citing a 1935 city code that prohibits sound permits to be issued within 500 feet of places of worship.

Since then, the City Council approved a pilot program where decibels, and not just distance, determine whether sound permits should be granted. That would allow the concert series to go forward.

The first show is scheduled for Thursday featuring Neil Sedaka.

Critics say the city is manipulating the law. [NY 1]

Brenda Lee opens for Neil Sedaka on July 15th. All Seaside Concerts start at 7:30pm and are free.

Continue reading "Mayor To Sign Sound Permit Bill For Outdoor Concerts"

ticket ladyticket ladyticket ladyticket lady

" Gov. Paterson is going nuclear in the political fight over New York's now-expired ticket scalping law. The state's 2007 scalping law, which removed price caps on the resale of tickets, expired Saturday.

As a result, Paterson is firing off a letter to 56 ticket brokers, including StubHub, reminding them a more restrictive law passed in the 1920s is back in effect. According to Paterson aides, that law prohibits the selling of tickets for more than $2 above face value.

And it prohibits primary sellers like Ticketmaster from tacking on service and delivery fees.

"Ticket resellers must act in accordance with the laws of New York State," the Paterson administration says in a copy of the letter, obtained by the Daily News." [Daily News]

School House Rock bill

"Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-8th Dist.) will announce federal legislation intended to overhaul the concert ticket industry and improve fans' chances of scoring tickets to their favorite acts.

The BOSS ACT (Better Oversight of Secondary Sales and Accountability in Concert Ticketing) [which is a clever acronym based on Bruce Springsteen's nickname] will require primary ticket sellers to disclose the number of tickets available for sale to the public and the number held back for fan clubs, presales and artist allocations, Pascrell told The Star-Ledger.

The bill would also prohibit brokers from purchasing tickets during the first 48 hours of the primary sale. It also makes it illegal for any primary ticket seller, promoter, artist or their employees to resell tickets to events they are involved in at more than their face value." [The Star Ledger]

Chuck Schumer is also introducing similar legislation, and the NY Times posted some thoughts on that.