Like a large majority of people all around the world, most musicians are stuck at home due to the coronavirus outbreak, and they're coming up with new ways to reach and interact with fans due to basically all tours being cancelled. One way is sharing the music they've been listening to to get through all this, which is what Have A Nice Life and Consumer member Tim Macuga has done. He shared with us seven songs he's been listening to lately, as well as commentary on each pick. It's a very cool, eclectic list, and you can check out the whole thing below...

--

Santana - "Going Home" (1973)

Usher in the new reality with Alice Coltrane conducting a massive wall of chimes and organs. And we’ll live in that introduction longer than an introduction needs to introduce anything because, Jesus, what happens next?

--

Blood doing James Brown as a hazmat-suited scientist of love (???), Amin Ali and Calvin Weston demolish bad feelings with a piledriving groove. Blood’s gonna tell us how to structure all of this uncertain time we have and to quit hitting Refresh on shit we don’t need refreshed.

--

McCoy Tyner - "Enlightenment Suite pt. I, II, III" (1974)

Still mourning. The heart of this playlist is 25 minutes of burning, all of it, ferocious.

--

Mike Patton - "Senza Fine" (2010)

Patton played it 95% straight on this album [Mondo Cane], and it was joy. I’m excited for the bewilderment and yearning I’ll get out of this one in five or six more weeks of slow (or suddenly explosive?) crisis - when we’ll shake our heads at how fresh and young a disaster could be.

--

Van Halen - "Sunday Afternoon in the Park" / "One Foot Out the Door" (1981)

Speaking of bewilderment.

--

Henry Threadgill Very Very Circus - "Try Some Ammonia" (1993)

Threadgill has always appeared to have a terrific sense of humor - your grind band isn’t that committed to cheeky or bizarre song title musings if the meditations are only 20 seconds a pop. Boogie through the ransacked supermarket for this long, wondering if he wants you to disinfect the tub or your esophagus.

--

Iannis Xenakis - "S.709" (1994)

The violins and tubas and Van Halen synthesizer experiments could all be gone if this really goes to hell. But we can always listen for new semblances of rhythm and melody in whatever’s left, right?

--

Before you go, watch this full-set video of Have A Nice Life in Brooklyn last year: