As you may have heard, Thrice's classic sophomore album The Illusion of Safety turned 20 earlier this year. It's not just one of Thrice's best albums, it's also one of the most crucial documents of the early 2000s emo/post-hardcore boom, and it holds up incredibly well today. The band have been celebrating by performing the album in full at a very select amount of shows -- they first did it at Furnace Fest last weekend, which marked the first time most of these songs had been played in 10-15 years, and the live debut of one of them -- and they'll do it again across four Anaheim shows in December. It's also getting an anniversary reissue, which includes the bonus track "That Hideous Strength" (which they also played at Furnace Fest), and we're thrilled to be teaming with them to offer an exclusive "coke bottle with black blob and white splatter" vinyl variant, limited to just 500 copies! Grab yours while they last.

We recently looked back on the album for the anniversary, and here's an excerpt:

On The Illusion of Safety, Thrice presented themselves as the full package. Not only were they at the right place at the right time, with an onslaught of instantly-satisfying songs that would endure for the next 20 years and counting, they were (and still are) one of the strongest, most tight-knit, most efficient bands this scene ever produced. Save for a three-year hiatus in the early 2010s, Thrice have been at it for over two decades with the exact same four-piece lineup, and each member is crucial. At the forefront is Dustin Kensrue, a commanding vocalist who can really sing and really scream, and whose lyrics and melodies have helped foster a connection between this band and their diehard fanbase for years. Next to him is Teppei Teranishi, a lead guitarist who gives any technical metal band a run for their money, but who never gets too showy and always puts melody above anything else. Holding down the rhythm section are brothers Eddie (bass) and Riley (drums) Breckenridge. Not only does Eddie give the band their thunderous low end, he can also get as tech-y and melodic as Teppei when the song calls for it. And if Dustin is Thrice's heart and soul, then Riley is its spine, a hard hitter who can dish out busy, complex fills but also knows when less is more. Thrice may not have had as many big hits as other bands during the emo boom, but of all the major bands in that scene, they remain the most forceful live band. That power and chemistry was as evident on The Illusion of Safety as it is today.

Read our full retrospective here and pick up our exclusive vinyl variant of the album here.

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