NYC record store Turntable Lab, which opened in 2001 on E. 7th St and moved to E. 10th St in 2017, has closed its doors for good. It never reopened after coronavirus lockdown in March.

The store made the tough announcement on their Instagram, with co-owner Peter Hahn writing, "When the 2007 financial crisis hit, I vividly remember a conversation I had with my cousin who is the most successful business person I know. He gave me a list of 5 things we should do to prepare. I was so green at the time, I just didn’t have the mental tools to make those kind of swift, decisive actions. We ended up grinding our way through with storefronts on both coasts. It’s still one of the hardest things I’ve done in my life, and it was painful. When COVID hit, I felt like it was second chance at the game. We reached out to the landlord early, gave him exactly what we needed to stay in the space. When it was clear that he wouldn’t budge, we acted." You can read their full announcement below.

Turntable Lab specialized in rap, dance music and DJ culture -- it was a also great place to pick up a turntable -- but they carried a wide variety of music, with an incredibly knowledgable staff. They'll be missed.

On the good news side, Turntable Lab's online store remains open and they note they will have Record Store Day titles for Saturday's "Drop" (8/28) at 1 PM ET.

via Turntable Lab

Turntable Lab's Statement:

Yes, we’re not reopening the 10th Street storefront. The online store is not going anywhere.

Since COVID hit, Anthony and I haven’t had a second to reflect. Crucial decisions stacked on top of each other, working late, dealing with supply chains, trying to keep our employees and families safe. I haven’t really processed that we’re closing our 10th street location. I was hoping for some time in September, but online voices carry. There’s so many people, records and years in that place, it might take a while to unpack.

I will however, let you in how we made the decision to close the storefront. When the 2007 financial crisis hit, I vividly remember a conversation I had with my cousin who is the most successful business person I know. He gave me a list of 5 things we should do to prepare. I was so green at the time, I just didn’t have the mental tools to make those kind of swift, decisive actions. We ended up grinding our way through with storefronts on both coasts. It’s still one of the hardest things I’ve done in my life, and it was painful. When COVID hit, I felt like it was second chance at the game. We reached out to the landlord early, gave him exactly what we needed to stay in the space. When it was clear that he wouldn’t budge, we acted. I realize not all businesses have a plan b like we do; but I believe small business owners should always be empowered, in good or in bad.

Not to say, we’re never not going to open another store in the future. Anthony and I have talked about finding a space like the original 7th Street location. Or maybe weed will be legal by then, and we’ll open up a hybrid Amsterdam cafe / record shop (always been a dream of ours). We’ll definitely keep the DJ booth to bring if we ever do.

Shout out to @davidazzoni who anchored the storefront for so many years, all the employees that made it magical, and of course, our storefront customers.